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Showing content with the highest reputation since 29/06/21 in Posts

  1. This showed up at home today - pretty happy with how tidy it is, certainly not mint, but I would have been shocked if it was. Flat battery, no engine coolant and a little exhaust leak will be the first little jobs to do, along with oil change and filters too. Chatted to a local compliance place that will do a pre compliance check over and point out any likely repairs needed, before doing a full on compliance inspection so will try get it to them in the next week or two
    53 points
  2. So it's been roughly 6 months and 5000kms, I thought I would do a situation report; It's fucking amazeballs. It's not stupidly big so I can use it as a daily no problem, although I do need to choose my parking spots a bit carefully. It's still big enough and industrial enough to make sure that merging like a zip is a given. It's actually really comfortable to drive, plus it's rock solid on the road. It will happily sit at 100 or so no problem. I'm getting on average 12.5l/100km, not amazing but not bad either. It is pretty lively off the mark so a reasonable balance. It takes a shitload of stuff. I put 45 sheets of 12mm ply on it the other day, 750 or 800kg, no problem. The deck is also big enough to take sizable items, it's way better than the townace for that. It's still quite noisy, I must find some vinyl and redo the floor with some deadening. I put some extra speakers on the dash that I got from the dump shop for $6, this helps me hear my audiobooks a bit better. Last night I installed a wee powered sub, now music is pretty listenable too. The wiring situation under the dash is getting stupid, I actually bought some distribution blocks today so I can remove the splice upon splice of power wires that power the stereo/sub/egt/cb/etc etc. It's got to the point even I don't know what's powering what. The engine rattle is still there but seems not to be an issue, I'll run it till it blows up I guess. But overall I am super happy with it, it is so incredibly practical. Its probably the best thing I have ever built. PFT, here it tonight loaded up with shite;
    48 points
  3. Far out! November last year was the last time I had tinkered away on this project. Time flies!!! Well both Hannah and I have been pretty busy with various things like having to get the housetruck finished off and road legal for sale and with that gone we had to build a place to live. The mezzanine build took a fair whack of time. That's all pretty much done, well at least to a point that we can happily live up there. I started losing a feel for time over summer with all that going on. Then a Micra/March turned up. A simple, cheap run about while the Imp is off the road eh. Then another Micra... and another. Oh - so now these are projects are they? FFS. Oh hey...what's that? Is that a Bedford TK truck in the yard. But hang on.. you've already got 4 other vehicles to play with, not to mention the old 4wd Hiace van that's getting bit rusty around the edges. Well screw all them. I just needed to get my 'flat six fix' so I dug out all the bits that had been hibernating under the bench and had some fun piecing them together in a sort of organised fashion on the table... Now where does this bit go?.... After having some fun taking photos I stashed some of the parts like the heads, cam gear, pistons etc that I wont need for a while back under the bench until needed. I had to confront a mini stumbling block I had with the oil pump drive sprockets. There is one small sprocket that slides onto the hub of a larger one and needed to be fixed in place. My initial thoughts were to weld it but I was worried that it would warp and cup. I sized it up for possibly bolting it in place using small cap screws but there just wasn't enough room between the chain and the hub, even for small 4mm screws. Welding it was going to have to be. I would get some advice though beforehand. But first I wanted to add a very slight taper to the teeth so there would be no sharp square edges that could potentially catch and rub against the inside of the chain plates. 3 of the sprockets were easy enough to pop in the lathe and give them a tickle with a flap disc. But the smallest I had to whip up a little hub to clamp it on... Trying to take a photo with one hand while holding an angle grinder in the other... Then sitting in front of the fire and cleaning off any sharp edges... Now I had sprockets I was happy with I had to confront my welding issue. I popped over the hill and chatted to another engineer I know who has a lot more experience with welding of such things than me. He pretty much told me what I had already guessed and I decided to just go for it. But just to be sure I thought it prudent to machine up a fake sprocket and hub to see how they faired when welded. There was no cupping evident so I went ahead with the sprocket. First thing though was to heat both parts up gently. Not too hot. Just hot enough that I could touch them but not get burnt... This way the welding could be quick and light without a mass of steel sucking the heat. But not so hot that shrinkage could be an issue either. I used the little tig welding table I had built ages ago for more comfort when doing such jobs... I'm certainly not a super neat tig welder like some artists out there (and never will be with only having decent sight out of one eye so judging the distance can be an issue) so I was very happy with the result and super happy that nothing pulled.. With this part finished I could concentrate on the chain tensioner design. I had a few ideas and had amassed a few bits to tinker with.... Being that the chains are under constant load and only turning a pump the tensioners are really only needed to stop excessive slap. Nothing to do with timing changes like a cam chain. I had two Datsun A12 tensioners to try out but no matter how I arranged them they conflicted with each other and there was no room for mounting bolts where I needed them.. So I tried out some Mazda/ford 2.0 duratec tensioners and they show great promise... I will make mounting blocks to suit and knock this part of the build on the head! Then onto finishing the bellhousing Hopefully some more updates soon although we have also started pulling one of the Micras down for the big swapsie game but that is mainly Hannah's project so I can keep working on this as I can.
    41 points
  4. Once upon a time, @Slacker_Sam. purchased yet another car, in an unfinished state as per this photo taken 20 years ago: Image © Sams Mum circa 2016? All Rights Reserved . "Little Sam and his new white sneakers and motorcar" Click photo for more The car - a 1972 Triumph 2.5 PI Estate in White(?) with manwell 4 speed + O/D, PI spec interior, injection system missing and replaced with carby@sentradave SUs, went into storage in 2016 after sitting for 16 years in an unfinished state at Woodburn Air Base. Cue 2020. Sam found another similar car needing less work and decided to offload this one. Sam lives at the top of the South Island and I live in the busy sh*thole of Auckland, so logistics were going to be fun. Buying cars unseen knowing full well they haven't been on the road since 2000 is what makes an adventure so a deal was done. What was needed however was some work to make a journey under its own steam. Enter THE HERO. A mythological and legendary figure of divine descent endowed with great strength and ability, an illustrious warrior, a person admired for achievements and noble qualities. Enter @yoeddynz and trusty sidekick @Hannah The car was delivered to the Hero's bat-cave and an assessment was done revealing the following treasures: Pre-cut inspection holes Factree weight reduction Speed holes Grot Further weight reduction was also found, the motor didn't run, the tyres were mush, the interior was in 1000 pieces and god knows what else. Needless to say I was optimistic.... Stay tuned for the next time I have half an hour to bring you the next exiting episode of Triumphant Estate Restoration!
    39 points
  5. A few things have happened since the above post, like reassembling and putting the engine and box back in the car. That happened maybe 3 weeks ago, and this weekend we tuned it. Long story short, it made 148hp at the hubs, it peaks then holds flat until limiter at just over 8k. Feels great in car. Here's some videos. This is on the local test track A quick 3rd gear motorway pulll from about 90km/h. Huge huge thanks must go to @Lithfor making the trip up to fastidiously tune the car, it drives really nicely, behaves well at all loads/conditions encountered so far and is just generally a pleasure to hoon around in.
    38 points
  6. right so, its all back together. but first, new clutch. its a niteparts designed unit which holds heaps of torque but drives like a normal car. this thing is huge. check out the friction plate on top of the Giken twin plate unit! 20210713_184945 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_184938 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-44-05 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_183646 by sheepers, on Flickr right so then i put the motor back in the car. had to mod the turbo dump pipe. also had to mod the intercooler piping by the throttle body to include a new larger blow off valve. other things done include all new pipe work to and from the turbo and all new hoses for the wastegate. im waiting on a new intercooler which should be here in a couple of weeks too. and tonight i took it for a drive round the block, so far so good. noo doortz though as it needs to be tuned with the new turbo. its booked on the dyno on the 6th of August. 2021-07-21_08-32-36 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-14 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-24 by sheepers, on Flickr
    37 points
  7. I cut the hardboard to size splitting it in two to allow me to tuck it into the roof gap. The cross brace could then be used to cover the seam between the two pieces. I used some ados ultra strength spray adhesive to glue the felt onto the hardwood and tucked it around the sides before sliding it back into place. Really pleased with the result, big improvement over what I had and only cost $70 in materials.
    33 points
  8. Had to collect the 125 from gc@nzstato offsite storage facility so he can put his own stuff in it. First time these have been together. Dropped the super heavy (C beam, 0.25" plate and angle iron) rear bumper/towbar that some PO had added (no rear bumper from factory!) and sanded the paint on the valance/ rear quarters behind it. Aaaand went over a few other patches again and so thats the last* of the maroon paint and its primer. Gave the cab a wipe down . Then gave the side i see the most a wizz with the polisher Not bad!
    32 points
  9. It's been a long while since the last post and I don't feel like I've done enough for a full post yet, but I do want to put something up to show what I've been working on and to say that neither me nor the project is dead yet. I had typed out a nice post but then the browser crashed and I lost all of it so this might be a bit less polished than usual as I try to rush it out. I carried on from the driver's side guard lip by doing the same to the passenger's side. It didn't take long to get the lip cut out and the new one tacked in. You've seen this all before so I shan't write too much about it. No sooner had I tacked it in, that half the bloody car fell off in my lap! I let myself be convinced by those less directly invested that this would be the best way to tackle the whole thing. To be clear, I agree with them, but damn is it not confronting to see it on the floor like that. This way I can get good access to properly panel beat all the welds, as well and ensure all the inaccessible cavities are properly sealed up and corrosion protected before I put it all back together. For example, see here the bare metal and (house) paint flaking off the inside of the lower window panel. I can paint this up properly and have total piece of mind when I weld the quarter panel back on. You can see also how much better access I have to cleaning up the weld on the wheel tub as well. With the quarter off, I had a nice easy down hand weld to get the arch final welded, then I stripped the panel inside and out. I then spend the next 50 hours panel beating the lower rear corner to clean up the patch welds and sharpen up the body lines that run back from the rear of the wheel arch. It's sitting with a guide coat at the moment so it looks far more wavy than it is. The welds themselves are pretty hard to spot at this stage if you didn't know they're there. I'm not very good at it but I'm enjoying the process. I still have the whole of wheel arch weld itself to handle as well, hence not feeling like enough progress to warrant a full post. Hopefully by the next post I'll have it welded back on the car and looking straight as an arrow. Here's wishing everyone a happy new year since it will likely be after that at this stage. Cheers.
    31 points
  10. We left our story with the discovery of a few tiny little rust holes. Our Hero @yoeddynz had his work cut out for him (a bit like the rust he found) I don't actually know what he did TBH, but he did send me some photos so I'll make my own story which is all 100% correct at time of publication*: 1. ROOF Holes previously found enbiggened, Alex played with a brass pencil and inserted lots of old rust filings into the hole he found from a Hillman Imp. Then he and added some black stuff and steel. Also tinted windows with plastic. Pleased with himself, he repeated the exercise on the other side also, while making some wooden boxes for his quad. A professional jigsaw enthusiast, he had no problems finding a piece of metal that fitted the exact hole he had cut out earlier. Metal glue applied to ensure it won't fall out. Note the colour -matched black & decker suspension adjustment tool. He then found two more pieces of steel and repeated the process on the co-pilot side, adding curtains to the passenger compartment also. The pencil now balanced on the roof. Happy with his efforts, he made more holes above the boot to be able to have another go Suck/blow/suck/blow repeat until tender and golden. All shiny and water-tight A spray of some black stuff for protection and that'll do for now. Gosh what a magic fixer guy! Also the observant of you will note that @Slacker_Sam. had found some brand new tyres and generously fitted them to make moving the car somewhat easier and safer. Tune in next time for more rust discovery, broken stuff and much excite. *could be?
    29 points
  11. Fire in the hole four bolts half wound in from bellhousing side and rest onto mounts. you can just see in photo sump is fouling on the removable stone guard which is holding engine up. Test fit of drivers half of bonnet shows its fouling by hopefully the same amount it needs to drop down. the untrained eye says the carbs will fit. fingers crossed
    29 points
  12. My son has wanted a cubby house / tiny house for ages. According to him it needed a Mezzanine, to look old fashioned, and be good for hiding out in. This is as close to the design brief as I could manage.
    28 points
  13. Steering column shortened, painted everything, got a clamp type u joint. now have steering again which I find useful
    28 points
  14. I've been printing some proper trumpets from HIPS material but they take about a day each. Currently two done, two to go. So no more glow in the dark PLA... Since I'm definitely not ever going to use the standard ECU anymore I've also been tidying up the loom a bit on both sides of the firewall. Chopped out a whole bunch of crap that doesnt need to be there anymore. Also put in my EarthX battery so thats about 8kg lighter from memory. On the whole I think I'm gonna try make the engine bay look tidy as best I can, and hopefully the lessons from this will flow on to future projects. I bought some Rays Engineering GR-N wheels which look beaten up to shit. But should come up alright and were a good price. Theyre still cast wheels but even so, are a little over half the weight of the ROH wheels haha. Currently in Carterton so if anyone's down that way and coming up to Waikato, let me know if you are keen on some $$$ to deliver some wheels! I've decided that even if I try do a fancy loom it's still going to look very busy with shit draped everywhere. Because there's just a lot going on. So a much easier solution that suits my lack of wiring skills is to make some cable trays that hid everything. This way it's easy to modify later if I want to add extra wiring, and still gives some good mechanical protection etc. So starting on the injector area and will run the VVTI solenoid wires through here too. It will have a top cover piece. But you get the idea. Will do the same for the other main wiring paths along the engine. I want it to hug the contours of the head as best possible, and be as slim/short as possible so it's still a few iterations from finished. Also at some point I will print another manifold that flips the throttles the other way up, so it hides the throttle cable arrangement a bit better.
    28 points
  15. I designed a device for you that bolts on to your pulley to stop it falling off and also supplied a scientific graph as I know how much you love them
    28 points
  16. Been looking at buying a jeep j20 ute for a few years , now that I've started a family I thought its time to get a sensible family wagon.. she's a jap import un-complied wagon with a blown up dinosaur emissions strangled 360 amc v8. first thing is an engine conversion, please give me your thoughts on what would be a good swap *I have a 15b toyota diesel 4.1L turbo 4 cylinder that I have priced up a 12mm 200cc pump for $2200 and a g-turbo red wheel for $2800 which should give good torque. *LS? *hemi? can buy late model with 4wd auto tranny. *duramax? don't want to spend more than 10K on parts for the swap if possible.
    27 points
  17. BACKSTORY Once upon a time - 1983 in fact, Auckland was the host of the New Zealand Motor show. All the manufacturers displayed their new offerings, including BMW with their new E30 3 Series BMW. Germany new the show as happening and sent out a top of the range 323i coupe, in hellrot red, with M-Sport interior, M stickers and a slightly breathed upon M20B23 motor with 5 speed transmission, just to give the press something a little more spicy than the average 323i, but not enough to raise alarm bells. The car went through a couple of owners until it ended up in a friends ownership in the early 90s. The car served the owner @Mr Burns's senior for a number of years. He was a spirited driver and enjoyed using the car to its full potential, including every trip to the shops for milk, or 4 up on family holidays around the country. By the early 2000s, as with most early e30s, there was more rust holding the car together than steel, so a running gear transplant was arranged into a 1984 4 door sedan and the old body was sent away. The blue sedan in better days. The 'new' sedan was daylied for a few years, until the same fate bestowed it's chassis. It was then parked up under a hedge for 15 years and forgotten about. Neglected The rusted car came into my possession at the sad passing of Mr Burns's senior, as reg had sadly lapsed, it hadn't run in an age. It was trailered and parked in my storage shed as a 'one day' project.
    27 points
  18. So Stu, what have you done in the last 6 months or so? Well, short answer is fuck all really... In non car related issues a rat somehow got in and ate through the water feed to the dishwasher, the house flooded meaning the brand new kitchen, the brand new t&g floor, and the garage ceiling below all needed to be replaced - yay. Insurance somehow managed to take 6 weeks longer to do the job than they said it would, and in that time the car and everything else for that matter had to be put in storage at the in-laws. They didn't seem to mind too much but its stole pride of place in their garage somehow - better than outside where it would fizzle away to a rusty pile. Anyway, its back where it belongs in the garage and I've been sneaking in the odd hour or two and chipping away at it. Last year I made up some new fuel lines from bundy tube, i was never 100% happy with it so ripped it out in favour of running new -6 teflon line through instead as I had a roll left over from my car building days. At work I butchered some brackets together on the cnc router using 10mm plate ali. They hold the breather, feed and return, and brake line up under the car. Here's the first test one I made. So I made a hole bunch, tidied them up and then ran them all through. It came out reasonably well. I didn't take any pics but these run through to a billet filter mounted low on the drivers chassis just under the fire wall, then up to the rail. The fuel reg is mounted low in front of the brake prop valve so its all pretty stealth which is what I was going for. So that's the fuel system done finally. Moving back to the engine I dummy fitted the coil plate which will work - just need to pickup some redtop cam covers that have the bolt provisions to hold the thing down. Richie might have a set for me so hopefully will try those up with some new breathers at some stage. The top cover then hides everything. I have finished wiring the hall effect sensors and put all the timing gear together and buttoned up the front of the engine. Just need to find the top cam belt cover which is currently awol. Still need to make a dizzy blanking plug. I got thinking about the factory spark plug cover and that it has the spark lead provision at the front that I don't need, so decided to make a new version without the up step. For now I've made a timber one but will run this from some 16mm plate at some stage and matty b it for a simple look. Here's the timber one anyway. Its pretty funny being timber - might just varnish it and leave it till it catches on fire Other than that, ive been working on the brake lines and have rebuilt the steering rack along with new boots, new rack inner and outer arms etc. Need to get a few hard lines made then check the system for leaks. Then its onto wiring then skids! See you in another 6 months...
    27 points
  19. Rebuilt the old cnc router. Runs heaps more reliably now. Brought some 50x50x3 aluminium extrusion at put it to work on some brackets. Finished and painted. With the Valves and sensor fitted. Mounted into the trunk.
    26 points
  20. Made up a door template from the good car. Fits 'OK' in the project for a start. I added the upper parts too to check the vertical positioning. I sent some pics to the wood man and he said it's not the worst he's seen so I suppose that's good? Also took the new one out for a breakfast run and tour of some of Rod Clifton's tractor patch.
    26 points
  21. Two nites in a row I went and looked at it and just didn’t know where to start. There’s plenty of pretty complex shapes and curves to tackle. Today I bit my lip and sunk the grinder into it! None of this really needs to be finished too flash unless it’s an edge or close to the skin. The grey side isn’t seen at all. Can’t imagine the car will have the bonnet attached at repair cert time either. Then mint.16 came and got my Honda monkey bike going after over a year so that slowed progression a bit, but yay!
    26 points
  22. i cleaned the things. then i put the motor back together. the cam gears have a slot in them for the dowel that is too big. the slot in the cam gear is 5.4 whilst the pin is 5mm. doesn't sound like much but its a good 5 degrees of play when you set up the cam timing. so to fix it i made some stepped dowels out of a 5.4mm drill bit. once id done that i re-dialed the cams to get them right. 2021-07-04_04-14-42 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-04_04-14-49 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-04_04-14-56 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-04_04-15-02 by sheepers, on Flickr
    26 points
  23. strip disc exposed the soft spots.. I need more dremel cutting wheels before attempting this one, as used last one the other day and forget to order during the day I lied, it wasn’t just the nose that rusted. for fox skates! Hate precision bonnet jobs. She’s had a wire wheel back and 2 coats of Brunox. I thought a round hole would be less likely to distort so used the step drill to open them up to fresh steel and zapped one weld at a time with a long cool down period in between. it worked, the important side is pretty flush and won’t need much aftercare. The brunox was a test, has a good name but haven’t used it before now. It’s all good, but doesn’t seem to go far and isn’t cheap. I’ve ordered some Fertan brand stuff to have a hoon on this time round, the inner of frame will be a great test for it. I got some front wheel bearings and 2L of 3M underbody Schutz for later on too. Stay tuned homos
    26 points
  24. Last few weeks have been productive..... Floor in, panels straightened and fitted, car dropped to painter to be rubbed back and fully primed and undersealed. It's now sitting at home, rust free and ready for seam sealing and getting it on it's wheels to mock up the engine.......
    25 points
  25. 24 points
  26. Today was the warmest day we’ve had in a while so I rushed home and got a few coats of etch on
    24 points
  27. Built this for an old workmate who absolutely is the epitome of "everything is a hammer" so much so all torque wrenches got referred to as torque hammers on site. It still functions and will dampen shock if you adjust it down , pretty cool kind of dont want to give it to him.
    24 points
  28. I didn't want an Aux cord floating about so I went and grabbed a bluetooth adapter. This one from Logitech had good reviews and required 5V power so I hacked up an old 12V usb converter. I needed to access the pairing button on the top when it was installed so I drilled a hole to suit and tucked the adapter underneath the head unit. I then tidied up all the wiring, replaced the 4 inch speakers and installed everything in the car. Really pleased with the result. You can switch between bluetooth and AM radio with the tape insert button and the bluetooth unit automatically pairs with my phone when I turn the ignition on. Sound quality is not bad considering the setup, goes hard for what it is etc.
    23 points
  29. Been fucking with the router down in the cold cold shed of an evening making various things, one of which is this; I'll buy some ACM to cover it and see how that goes...
    23 points
  30. One part I neglected to address in my previous post about the driveshaft was the sliding yoke. It was seized, and no amount of pretending it wasn't was freeing it up. The sliding yoke sits at either end of the diff half of the drive shaft. Sometimes it's on the diff end of the shaft, or in my case, it's in the middle near the center bearing, depending on where BL felt like assembling it. Either way, it's a crucial part of the driveshaft. As the rear axle travels up and down in normal driving, the rear section of the driveshaft has to raise and lower with it. The problem is that the axle travels in an arc, which means the distance from the axle to the center hanger bearing increases and decreases slightly as it moves through its travel. To account for this change in distance, the driveshaft needs to be able to change length. This is done with the sliding yoke. Inside the yoke is a series of strong splines, which mate with another set of splines attached to the end of the driveshaft. This allows the shaft to transfer power through it via the splines, but also slide in and out to account for the movement. A cap, spring and seal stop the spline from coming all the way out. My yoke didn't slide at all. It was completely compressed at its shortest length and would not budge. I tried many things to free it up, including filling it with penetrating oil and hitting it with various hammers. Nothing. I even tried hanging it and seeing if gravity would free it up (it didn't). I tried a few other things with no luck, but the one thing I was lacking was tension on the spline. Hitting it to shock it was fine, but if there was no tension pulling the two halves apart then I was only going to get so far. So I had a brainwave (it hurt). Two ratchet straps and a very sturdy workbench later, I had this contraption I ratchet strapped each end of the shaft to a leg of the bench and put tension on the shaft. With one hand I grabbed the yoke and leaned back, putting even more tension on the shaft. With my other hand, I hit the flat of the driveshaft with a hammer. Sure enough, after a few hits, I saw movement and then with a POP it fully extended. I unscrewed the cap at this point, which reveals the cork seal and washer. The cork seal is known for being pretty chewed up and is unobtainable new now. Thankfully mine was in mint condition. And for the first time I could see the splines. The old grease was black and disgusting, and the splines had obvious signs of surface corrosion. One thing to make sure of is that both halves are clearly marked so it is reassembled in the same location. I scribed lines into the yoke and driveshaft and then marked it with a white paint pen. The spline isn't keyed, so can fit many different ways. The main thing to take care of is that the UJs are in phase, which means they both have to be in line with each other. With the spline removed it was time to get cleaning. All the old grease was cleaned off with brake cleaner and a toothbrush. Which revealed why it was seized together. All the teeth had surface rust to some degree. This was binding with the internal splines in the yoke. A good wiring brushing quickly got rid of most of it, showing the splines to be in good shape otherwise. The splines were then slathered in grease ready for reassembly. The internal splines in the yoke also got a good clean Once I was satisfied with the condition of the splines I packed the yoke with grease and slid the driveshaft back in. And wound the cap back down over the seal. A quick wipe to remove the grease ejected out the breather, and we're done. The joint slides freely so should do the job nicely. With that done, the driveshaft had been completely overhauled now and is finally 100% ready to go back in the car.
    23 points
  31. More scrappy part-finished hood frame shiz.
    22 points
  32. Some filling/blocking priming underway, coming out way better than I imagined
    22 points
  33. It’s still progress even if it’s to cold to do physical work on it right? Ah shit, wet mangled box phew not rooted! Some damage to the tulip/deck filler/Dutchman panel but easy fix. even included a bonus fancy Honda trans mount with an electrical sensor some poor sap will be waiting for on a 2day service! This only took a week to arrive!
    21 points
  34. It's still not 100% but I'm not gonna lie I'm stoked with how this is going to end up looking (Wont be white for final version)
    21 points
  35. Unboxed the lower quarter piece to test fit. Not too bad but I think the B-pillar needs some persuasion. I'm going to make a pattern off the good car for a comparison (although I don't know for sue if that is exactly right either). This wood stuff seems easier than making steel skins up though
    21 points
  36. 21 points
  37. Steel work pretty much finished! Chopper has done a killer job on it, no filler in it yet, looking pretty straight in epoxy, repair certifier has had a look and is happy too!
    21 points
  38. With the driveshaft all fresh and clean, all I needed to do was crawl under the car and refit it. While under there though, I thought it prudent to replace the last remaining fluids. Refitting the driveshaft was easy enough. I reused the old bolts but invested in some new locknuts to secure them. It turned out that the new center bearing has different sized captive nuts, so the old bolts wouldn't work. I got fed up with having to guess and buy bolts one by one, as all my stocks of spare bolts are of course Metric, and the Marina is Imperial, so ended up buying a kit of various sized Imperial nuts, bolts and washers from Trademe. With the driveshaft completely refitted I moved on to changing the driveline fluids. Both the gearbox and diff call for a GL5 EP90, which as it turns out, is a bit harder to find locally. I chose to go with a Castrol Axle EPX 80W90 instead, which is a GL5 spec EP oil. The gearbox was easy to drain and fill. The fill plug, which you should remove first, is on the RH side. Just a normal imperial square, as is the drain plug on the bottom. The old fluid, which has been in there for at least 25 years, wasn't as bad as it could be. It had a few years to settle at the bottom and was thick with a dark grey hue, that later changed to a dark brown. No chunks though, so that's a win. I pumped some fresh fluid through to help shift anything sitting on the bottom, and refit the drain plug. Just a smidgen over 1L was pumped into the box, and when it started to dribble out I refit the fill plug. A quick clean and that part of the job was done. Next was the rear diff. This was a bit of a pain as there is no drain plug, only a large fill plug. I tried a large syringe but it was taking way too long, so not wanting to be defeated, I grabbed the handheld vacuum bleeder. And I'll be, it worked a treat. Still slow because the waste fluid bottle is only about 100mls, but it flowed easily after a few pumps of the handle. After getting as much as I could out, which was about 10 bottles of gross, almost black, stinky fluid that had likely been in there since it was built almost 50 years ago, I filled it with about 1L of fresh new fluid. Once again, refit the fill plug, clean it off and done. Now that I had the driveshaft in, I could do something that hadn't happened in a VERY long time.... see if the driveline works. The first step was to install the pedal rubbers Mmm fresh. I did that now, because it's way easier to do without the seat installed, which was next on the list. What does having a seat installed mean? Sitting making vroom vroom noises of course! Then I fired the engine up, put it into gear, and eased the clutch out. It works! For the first time in 10-25 years, the hubs spun under their own power. Ignore the angry tractor idle, I really need to warm it up and give it a decent run, but I can't do that until we are out of the garage. So, when is that I hear you ask. Well, the wheels need to go off and be blasted and powder coated, and then the new tyres can be fitted. Once that's done, on the car they go, and the car can FINALLY come down off the stands it's been on since I got it. For now, I'll just be here reading my original Leyland Australia parts catalogue from 1975 Which is pretty handy really, since it shows me how things like the heater/vent ducting go together since currently it's all in a box and I had no idea. It's completely different to the Uk cars, and the heater box is actually the same as the Aus built Mini Clubman of the time. Soon.
    20 points
  39. Gave the crabs a birthday, both seemed to be weeping gas from the between the top plate that the floats attach to. Cleaned everything and reassembled. Also installed a new set of plugs, really need to buy some leads, these fuckers must be nearly twenty years old. Anyway, one of the plugs was only finger tight and a couple had oil stains around the thread? Maybe those rings are stuffed? When I had it on the bench, I re torqued all the head studs, very carefully as to not pull any out of the magnesium engine case. After a quick test of oil pressure, it started up okay, needed a small clutch adjustment,warmed it up around the block, clutch works so nice, like butter, very pleased. On return, it was idling a bit fast, which is a pain. This engine must be warm to set the carbs. Disconnect the throttle linkage completely, and get both carbs to match. Got both down to 2-2and a bit on the air meter. It's never run this smooth, imagine if I could actually tune the Dells! My son found this for me in a thrift shop, I've been looking for one for a while. To go with my og 90s thrasher sticker. Stoked. And yes it's already leaking!!! Quite badly! Seems to be mostly the cylinders, between the case on side1-2, and from between the head on 3-4? Dogs will hunt! Still really pleased with the work done, clutch works well, flywheel hasn't fallen off, I did it to spec but man, if that was 270lbs it musta been 4 or 500 when I took it off. Engine mounts are definitely softer, it does not like hard launch's. All the axle tramp! Not to worried, I said I'll renovate the house next and I'm not driving it daily but it's nice to have it ready it go.
    20 points
  40. Its moving day.... Here it will be sit for some undetermined amount of time... I may be able to get the wheels/tyres refurbed while it stays in storage but there wont be much of an update on this until I build my new shed. Been a good fun project so far and am itching to get the rest of it completed and on the road...
    19 points
  41. And fast forward to yesterday, I stripped out the interior, loaded up the van with some NOS panels from my "stock", Loaded in the trailer and took it to my panel guy who did the Mk1 for me - exciting!
    19 points
  42. I printed some prototype long trumpets that fit under the bonnet / dont hit anything. Because I'm lazy and I figured they might not work too well. They are currently made from glow in the dark PLA haha. However, they worked a treat! Fuel table now needed around 11% more fuel at 4000-6000ish range, and then about 5% more fuel towards redline. Nowhere did it need fuel taken out. cool. So I'll remake them out of something better, maybe try a little shorter and see if I can push that big bump of gains a little higher in the rpm range. The shape of the fuel table tells a bit of a story. about 4k onwards is where it starts ramping up This is with no VVTI so once that's going I'd expect to reclaim a bunch of midrange as well, maybe a little more up top. Current problem is that it keeps spitting the front engine pulley off. It unwinds the bolt any time I rev it to the moon a few times. So maybe there's some weird harmonics going on. Tried some loctite and tightening it as tight as I could, but still happens. So will try a fresh bolt and pulley, hopefully that fixes it somehow. Maybe this motor doesnt enjoy being revved to nearly twice its intended rpm. Who can say? Also, my plan to use good tyres as a poor mans LSD hasnt worked too well. There isnt much weight over the front left so it spins it up real easy which is annoying. So will have to make a start on getting that other box sorted.
    19 points
  43. Been a while, last time I drove this was during lockdown last year. I start it every now and then otherwise the clutch sticks on. The clutch has been the bane of my life since I bought this car, now it'll lose its fluid in about 2 months so I bit the bullet and had the clutch master/slave resleeved and new seals at Canterbury Brake and clutch (their quote was literally half the price of safe r brakes which was $2-250 per item. Would defo recommend. Last year I was at @RUNAMUCK's place for a meat and was commenting on the nice custom radiator in his datto. That led to this Custom mk3 zephyr radiator for a fucken good price, doesn't fit quite like the original but nothing a couple of spacers won't fix. Just need to clean the system out before I mount it. What I thought was bad rust at the bottom of the pass a pillar turned out to be just some light surface rust from when the front screen leaked, treated that. That leaves just one thing and I can get it another wof ready for the drive up to golden bay. If anyone has a good hook up on exhaust fab that would be great (I have zero time, and I'm out of mig gas)
    19 points
  44. Popped into the infamous Kaikoura kart track on my way back up 4.1 definitely has given her a bit more pep. Interested to see if the fuel mileage differs much when I fill up tomorrow (didn't want excess weight getting onto ferry)
    18 points
  45. Roll on to 2017 and I got wind of a 1988 e30 Coupe without transmission and a uninstalled motor going for cheap. (This was before the prices of E30s started taking off) I ventured north with @Threeonthetree and found this: It was a facelift 318i 'rust free*' coupe in delphin grey. Povo spec and in pieces. Body looked straight and I saw potential so Dragged it home and parked it up until time allowed for further investigation.
    18 points
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