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  1. So while I plan out what my induction and exhaust setup with consist of I thought it best to get the alternator sorted. The goldwing engine originally had its alternator mounted off the back of the engine on a seperate casing now removed and driven via one of the many gears that resided within this casing between the engine and the clutch area. That area is now taken up by the bellhousing I have built and the alternator has to go on the front of the engine (which now the back ? of the engine as it sits in the imp..) and be driven off a crankshaft pulley that does not exist. This is what it looks like .. That little round cover hides the main cambelt drive pulleys and has a belt guide plate marked with various timing marks for setting up the ignition.. Under that pressed steel disc resides the first of the pulleys. Sandwiched between the pulleys is a 12 tooth trigger wheel - handy for my planned engine management on a six. I'll replace it with a 36-1 wheel though. So I need to machine up a few bits to allow the crank to run a mini v belt pulley and drive the Honda alternator which I had picked up at the local wreckers will sit about here... At another wreckers I found a pressed steel 5pk pulley from a power steering pump that was about the right diameter, had a flat mounting face and bolted in place with 4 little bolts. Ideal for my plan. I cut it down to suit a 3pk belt.. Then I popped a big lump of steel bar I luckily had left over from some other job into the lathe and machined up a hub with a locating extension on one side to match the inside of the cambelt pulley, of which which extends beyond the crankshaft nose by about 3mm. It drives , via a pin pushed into hub, off the hole in the cambelt pulley, which is there to locate the original timing plate.. The other side of this hub I bored out as far as I could whilst still allowing enough meat to bolt the pulley on. This hub then bolts onto the crankshaft, eccentrically located by the camshaft pulley and held fast by the crankbolt.. Then I machined an alloy 'plug' that fits snug into the bored out hub, machined on the end to centrally locate the steel pulley, rather then rely on the bolts.. And all lined up... So now I have a front drive pulley. Yay. Next up is making some sort of way to mount the alternator securely and not too ugly considering its going to be right there, centrally on view. Starting the mount by making lots of little tiny bits of alloy to tread about the workshop with this tool... I cut some strong alloy plate and mounted it to the top of the engine using several of the conveniently placed cast in mounting points scattered about the place on top of the engine. Thanks Honda I had to add a support on the front, easily bolted to the cambelt housing. Now I had a place that the alternator brackets could be bolted to. I just made it up as I went along and machined bits and pieces until I had what I was looking for. I wanted it to look a mix of between sort of factory and sort of 'race car'. I had lots of fun making more alloy swarf.. Of course I cut my plate too narrow... Eventually I ended up with all these bits to piece together... Together they made this.. But before I plonked the alternator in place I had to clean it. It looked horrid and had obviously resided in a Honda of some ilk with some serious oil leaks. It was also a bit corroded and things didn't want to pull apart too easily. I made a bespoke little bearing puller.. The filthy alloy castings came up nice with a petrol bath.. and even nicer with some wire brushing... While it was apart I cleaned up the slip rings... Painted the centre black. It will possibly be repainted in Imp blue at a later date, as a treat if the engine swap works out ok. Its just a look I quite like - call me 90s boy. Bolted it all back together, complete with a new main bearing that I happened to have in stock (must be one of the most common bearings ever -35/15/10) Then excitedly bolted it in place. My Honda goldwing now has a standard alternator mounted in a pretty normal fashion and it looks nice and neat... With that sorted I can move onto making the cooling pipes and induction setup. I have still not fully made my mind up on what route I'll be taking here but I'll probably to bite the bullet and click buy now on a set of itbs so at least I have something to play with and go from there. I need to find a set of suitable top feed injectors. Something around 200cc at a guess. The standard Honda goldwing 1800 items look like they'd be ok and pretty compact. I'll be making the mounting seats to suit, which I'll then weld in place on the stock intake runners. Fuel rail made to suit.
    65 points
  2. Chassis update: I managed to make it back to NZ for a bit, a couple of months ago, to have a go at this chassis building thing my Dads been raving about! Turns out it is actually hard work! Hes just finished both rails! I just got a bunch of machined parts done. Spring mounts and braces that go between the rails. Just have two sheetmetal braces to figure out then all of it can be bolted/riveted together (with a few more holes and some tweaking I'm sure!)
    60 points
  3. It drives. Got a few bugs to work out though. The main one is it gets hot, and can't cool itself down. This might be a bit of a prick to sort out as there's no room left I think it has more boost than it should do Brakes are a bit spongy, might need next size up master cyl, might improve once they bed in a bit Seats are a bit low Needs something to stop the pinion angle changing under accel, driveshaft just knocked the floor slightly
    52 points
  4. So I got to do hoons around manfeild with the Circle Jerk Crew a week back. I expressed some interest, they said sweet so I wrote a list and got into getting it ready. I drove it heaps leading up to the event (not legal and seen lots of cops with no issues) and on the day the alternator frizzed itself and i thought we were done. Thankfully @Flauski made some calls and we found a replacement and got it sorted and back out. Car went well with speedo touching 170kph (how accurate this is I don't know) and eventually the brakes got spongy and power steering squirted under the bonnet. Drove it to and from the track and even got a lap in around feilding. Was good seeing familiar faces and meeting others from here and else where.
    40 points
  5. Well, this was never part of the plan. Mate gave me a message one morning linking a TM auction "This will fit in your shed right" Well yeah...... Cool, I hit buy now. Umm, what? I was now obligated to arrange the pick up of a 3.5t Morbidelli cnc router, condition unknown. Much to my surprise, after arranging an inspection, the staff fired it up and gave me a quick demo, the nightmare of owning more scrap metal was diluted with hope, this may not be a terrible idea. Key issues at this point 1) Power, I live in the central city on 1ph power, I need to get 3ph 2)Transport, my truck has a 3.5t tow rating, that doesn't include the trailer right? 3) Shed space, currently the shed has a divider which was half knocked down to fit the Datsun 4) Sneak past her indoors..... First off, Power The same mate that dumped this on me also offered the loan of a 3ph rotary converter, this coupled with a tame sparky resulted in a trip to the wholesalers, cables, switchboards and various tidbits were stacked up and brought home, I dug a hole and laid a hefty cable. Issue 2 Transport Realising that shifting such a machine from the other side of the city was well outside Bunning's trailer abilities I gave up any thought of 'doin it cheap' and dialled for a HIAB, best move, the truck even managed to trim a few trees I had neglected... Issue 3 Shedspace With a router now sitting outside, multiple trips to the dump were made and the remains of the partition removed, shifting the router in was and interesting task, I had envisaged using dynabolts, 4wd winch and pulleys to get it in, thankfully the loadskates were efficient enough that a ratchet strap was plenty to move it in a more controlled fashion. I now have a very large hunk of steel sitting in the way, at least it makes a good table! Now all this did not take 'a few days' the router sat outside the workshop for at least a week as I toiled away, any hope of sliding it by without the girlfriend noticing was well lost, I may still be in debt a cake or 7. Just needing power hooked up and sign off by the sparky everything was go, until it wasn't. -Sparky had legit delays -Reality of the machine sprung a good deal of remorse. You see, the manufacturer Morbidelli are the type that decide to swim upstream and do thing just different enough that its recognisable but still not quite friendly, while this machine will do cabinet production well, it can't be tricked into making car bits, nor will it accept anything programmed by not their software. Once the sparky had called by and we fired it up, multiple air leaks meant nothing could be run as my small compressor couldn't get the pressure up. Crap. A shining light of the deal is a full folder of schematics, spending far too many weekends reading, I narrowed down the electrical faults, cleared one by one and isolated unrequired solenoid banks, after further poking through manuals it became very clear, this machine was here to make shelves, all else can go to hell. With various tricks and rewiring of circuits, we managed to function test the 3 different spindle drives, all three axes and the vacuum pump, with proof the mechanics are fine, round two can begin. I have ordered the hardware to hand over the controls to Linuxcnc, along with prioritising of the pneumatic controls, this should simplify the machine to something which is far more flexible than the standard function it has run. I also have some plans for the table and work fixtures, this machine is so heavy and rigid, I see no reason it can't mill aluminium and plastics which along with timbers, will be a pretty handy toy to have (well better be for the space it takes up) Stay tuned, as the parts arrive i'll document the conversion from Italian to LinuxCNC
    37 points
  6. Some more boxes ticked, wiring is all done, carpet, shifter, seats, all in for good now. this car has the upper belt anchorage in the roof so it was very uncomfortable with a static belt as it rubbed your neck/ear, which got annoying and I'd loosen the belt which meant it wouldn't work properly I fitted a new anchorage for a retractor and that meant I could use lap diagonal retractable belts with a dropper off the roof so the belt is in the right position With the seats, belts, and shifter position, it is the most comfortable car I own now, which is kinda funny, because it will likely be massively hungus on the pertols so won't be driven long distances...
    37 points
  7. I got this back when i was an apprentice and did many of the period correct mods. RB30DET, cut a hole in the front bumper for larger intercooler, loud exhaust, terrible surge tank in boot, poorly fitted gauges (not in the A pillar to my credit) etc etc. It went terribly fast, and ran kind of poorly due to some lol issues that i never worked out at the time. I went overseas not long after and i kept it in an old barn on dads farm with dreams of someday spending a heap of cash on it and doing skids etc This pic was early 2019 when we dragged it out of the shed. Lack of genuine barn dust due to being well covered for 10 years. Nothing happened until maybe a month ago when i got the motor out and apart. Assume the position like the rest of my shed - bonnet up.. Im not sure about the condition of the crank, it has some marks and has already been ground undersize, so i stripped a spare rb30 and will get it measured up and the machining done in July hopefully. So far, i have nitto rods, CP pistons 8.5:1, link G4X fury, 1000cc injectors, GTX 3582r, sinco manifold Its 4wd so i might buy one of those flash PRP block brace/adapter plates. Apparently they are necessary, as if you have 600+hp and a front LSD you will crack the block. But they are expensive, and so is a front LSD. so i might pass on that. Also bought a bosch DBW throttle, and got a 350z pedal assembly, they bolt straight in so that was an easy win. I have some time off in July so hopefully ill make some progress
    36 points
  8. Have just had Kaz at KP Upholstery retrim the factory seats i had that had been covered in some sort of velvet material in a past life ha. Picked them up today along with the doorcards. Vast improvement! Very happy how they have turned out, He has recreated the factory interior style which will look the part im sure!
    36 points
  9. I had a few last things to do before attempting to start the engine. First was putting some coolant in the system, got 5.4 litres in to start. After that it was fitting the oil filter sandwich plate/thermostat and plumbing the lines to the oil cooler. Once that was done I could fill it with oil. Phone makes it easier to check the level. On the wiring side it's still a mess, good news though is the CHEC message mentioned earlier was due to the kill switch so no problem there. I decided I will keep the start button and mount it near the shifter so I found a momentary one backlit by an LED, the LED is connected to the neutral circuit. The starter won't work if it's not in neutral so it's a good combination. The other switches in the picture are just for testing purposes, one disconnects power from car and the other switches between using the clutch switch and direct to ground. There is one electrical module I still need to remove, I have ditched the narrowband 02 sensor already. Most seem to use a resistor to trick the ecu but I found that the factory have an easier way where a particular ground from the ecu can be snipped to disable it. Still to be removed is the PAIR system which adds air to the exhaust port for emissions reasons, removing it improves low rpm running, I will just use a resistor for that one. I'm close to finalising it all and will move onto lengthening/shortening/tidying it soon. The horror A final check over of the fuel system was made. I had to test the thermistor was working as I want to use it to tell me if the surge tank has fuel. My modified pump hanger only just fits in and out of the tank. Time to add some gas Using a manual switch the lift pump primed the tank with no problems, then flicking off the kill switch I could hear the efi pump prime the system. Only one thing for it now Very happy with how it ran, the exhaust isn't too loud and has a nice low sound not captured in the vid.
    32 points
  10. When I was a kid, my Mum taught me that it was rude to take basically anything offered to us kids when we went somewhere. So we go to someone's house, and they're expecting us, so they've made some chocolate biscuits especially for us to eat. Which are the best thing ever because I'm like 8 years old. Fucking delicious! However. I'd been conditioned to say "No thank you" because doing otherwise was rude. For the person who baked something especially for us arriving, it's was disappointing that no one wanted their food. "How could kids not want delicious my biscuits?" "Are they especially bad?" "What did I do wrong?" How could my Mum not understand how mutually disappointing this situation was? It didnt make any sense to me then, and I've still no idea who profited from this situation. The people were happy to give me a biscuit, and I was happy to eat it. Surely this is the worlds simplest situation to keep everyone happy. I fucking love biscuits, and it tears me up thinking how many I missed out on, at the stage of my life when they were the most delicious. God damn. For some reason, tonight I have had a revelation that refusing willing help from people here draws parallels to this situation. I have been conditioned to feel shameful about accepting assistance that's willingly offered. Why? So for anyone who's willing to chip in a few bucks, I can promise you this: I'll spend any contributions towards a Prius motor, and maybe exhaust parts. I will not spend any contributed money on psychological counselling for my unresolved childhood trauma about missing out on biscuits. I also promise I will come to your house and eat your biscuits if you invite me over. https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/finding-a-cure-for-the-atkinson-cycle Thanks to anyone that wants to help, and by all means dont anyone feel obligated.
    32 points
  11. The not-engine bay is looking tidier, found a better hose combo so the cooling system at the front is ready. Hose clamps are longer than I like but what evs. I got the fan mounted and wired in, I won't bother with a shroud just yet though. Next up, more ugly temporary bracketry. It took a bit of fiddling to find a good position for the oil cooler in the vent hole, it had to line up with the body so each of its three mounts are different but it can be removed assembled which is handy.
    31 points
  12. Moving on from the last lot of repairs, I have also been tinkering with a few other small issues, in preparation for a potential WOF check. It may be obvious, but the work on this car is kinda sporadic and not really following much of a plan. That's because there currently isn't really one. I'm feeling a bit lost and well over my head, as I don't want to spend money fixing other issues, only to have to put the car into storage until I can fix the engine if it does go pop. What I have been doing is just ticking some things off the list that don't cost me anything but time. Some of these are also getting fixed with the aim of potentially taking it for a WOF check. Technically a clattering POS engine won't fail a WOF, so it's possible I might be able to get it on the road before doing the engine work. The first work I had to do was kinda forced upon me. The outside temp overnight the other night dropped below zero, and having already checked when I got the car, I knew the anti-freeze mixture in the car was pretty rubbish. I pulled the car into the garage for the night to try and keep it above zero, and the next day worked on draining a few litres out of the system and topping it up with anti-freeze, just so there was some sort of a mixture in there. It's not perfect, but it's better than nothing (and no point flushing the system now). Of course, it wouldn't be one of my Rovers if it didn't leave a green puddle at some point I ran the car up to temp, bleeding the cooling system (it's mostly self bleeding) and then set on the next task. Another easy check is to make sure the throttle pot is set up correctly. Most probably aren't, and will result in the ECU not fuelling correctly. When checked with a multimeter, the throttle pot range should be between 0.32v +/- and 4.7V +/-. Mine wasn't quite there (better than Effie though, which read zero at idle). And this is where I discovered the car cannot reach Wide Open Throttle. It stops opening at about half throttle... I marked the throttle pot and tweaked it slightly. This brought the closed throttle reading into line But I was still stuck at half throttle. If I disconnected the linkage to the throttle I could get the full opening (or near enough, it might need a little more tweaking but it's not an exact science) It turns out the auto trans kickdown cable was so badly adjusted it was stopping the throttle from opening fully. The adjustment was wound completely out (I've actually backed it off slightly in this photo for testing, it was right on the end of the thread initially) I backed it off until I could get full throttle and then locked it off. A test drive shows that the car has significantly more grunt when you give it a boot, no surprise there; nothing like opening the last half of the throttle to wake the engine up, but I had lost kickdown on the transmission. Clearly, I need to wind the adjustment back in a bit further. The kickdown works by the linkages pulling on that cable when at a certain percentage of throttle, which overcomes the spring pressure in the transmission and pulls on a rod that causes the transmission to kick down a gear. If the cable isn't being pulled enough because the throttle hits the stops before the cable overcomes the spring pressure, it won't kick down. I can still manually shift the transmission, but I will tweak it so kickdown works again. Next on my list of things to fix, was the washer system not working, and having a bodge in place. This is a common failure point, and the easy fix is to do what both a previous owner of this car and also Effie did and fit a replacement external pump to suck through a failed pump. The pumps on these have no filter, so if they suck in gunk they are prone to jamming up and no longer working. They are mounted on the bottom of the bottle with grommets. I removed the bottle and found the bottom of it covered in green algae. No guesses for what's jammed the pumps then. The cap is also missing, so that won't help. I cleaned the bottle out with some household cleaner and a good blast from the garden hose. One of the pumps is jammed solid and I cannot free it, but after some gentle persuasion of the percussive kind, the other pump began to spin freely. The good thing is that they are both the same pump, so can be swapped front to rear. I don't need the rear washer to work at this point, so as long as I can get the front working, I'm happy. The replacement pump has been fitted on the front guard, sucking through the failed pump. This pump did make working noises, but with the bottle dry and full of slime I didn't actually try putting any water through it. Thankfully no wiring had been cut or altered, they had made a fly lead that plugged into the standard wiring, so all I had to do was unplug it, cut the zip ties and remove the one screw holding the pump to the car. I then refit the bottle to the car, plugged the pump in, put some water in the bottle and hit the button. Sure enough, a large jet of water fired from the hose. We have a good pump. To replace the external pump and join the two sections of the hose, I fitted a handy one-way valve I happened to have spare. This then allowed the pump to send water to the washer jet, but nothing came out. Darn. The jet is just held in fairly loosely with a couple of clips and pulls free with a bit of wiggling. I found the hose under the jet was kinked completely over, which wouldn't be helping, but the jet was also blocked. I could've cleared this with compressed air, but being too lazy to fire up the compressor I instead used pressurised brake cleaner forced into the outlets of the jet (reverse flushing it). This worked a treat, blasting some black grot out the back of the jet. I did this in both directions until I was getting a nice stream of fluid out of the jet. With the jet fitted directly to the outlet on the pump, I could test that the jet was working. The spray pattern wasn't great; they never are, but there was a good volume of fluid coming out of it. With the jet refitted to the panel, I finally had a front washer jet again. It puts enough fluid on the screen to clear it, so that's a good pass. Probably puts enough fluid onto the car next to me to clear their screen too. Yes, the wipers are mismatched and sit too low. Yet more things to fix. I reluctantly took a look at the rust above the windscreen. There were a couple of small blisters in the paint which had me worried, after having dealt with the Corolla rust. Thankfully it looks like it may have started from a stone chip, as after some careful poking, wire brushing and sanding, it was on the surface, doesn't go too deep and looks worse than it is; a completely different sort of rust to the Corolla. It may go down under the bright trim, but I can't see without removing it. I treated it with some rust converter, and once dry, gave it a coating of epoxy zinc. I'll need to get some colour matched touchup paint at some point, but for now, this should keep it under control. The sunroof panel is still ruined though, but I'm ignoring that and pretending it doesn't exist. Those bubbles on the left will be a hole if I look too hard at them. I did manage to take the car further than around the block, just for a quick shakedown. I took it two blocks away to a local park and grabbed some photos. Despite its flaws, it's a hell of a car to look at and drive. Now, if it would stop clattering, so people were looking at the car for the right reasons, instead of trying to work out if they should move back in case it explodes, that'd be nice.
    31 points
  13. It went to its inspection, haven’t heard back though. My garage situation means I needed to hustle and get this vulnerable metal sealed and protected. Fucking marathon of shitty jobs and many hours spend rolling around under the thing over a week but I’m starting to feel like I’m progressing the way I want to! My eyes still crunch when I blink but it’s worth it? Rear end needs another coat then I can sling it back in. I used a can of cavity wax in all the orifices but I’ll need to grab another tomorrow to finish, then a second coat. Don’t get it in your beard. and one shed down! Contractors have pushed a week so I’m chilling on the green shed demo for a little longer.. I’ve got a crooked spine so I get wrecked after doing physical shit and I’m ok with a wee breather.
    31 points
  14. long time no hear. Have had the work/life balance tipped way too far to the work side since jan 21 and haven't done much on the car. I did get the engine assembled, and @Bistro gave me a hand to install and test drive/run it in sometime maybe earlier this year. Engine went really well. Knocked a bit with the old gas in the tank, but is going sweet with some fresh stuff. Just running a stock cam and single carb at the moment. I have a cam and a MAXX ecu to run the injected carbs. Need to do the fuel supply inside the carb hats, and order some lash caps to suit the cam. Hopefully ill get onto it later in the year. Image hosting seems to have packed a shit so ill try something else. As it sits, a good storage area for my other projects...
    29 points
  15. ^ plus logistics So yesterday.. Cool someone some sent me a parcel. hmm yeh nar, one step above receiving 20v parts So to keep everyone in the science loop, i'll fill in the header construction part Stock are 32mm od diameter The aftermarket ones are 35mm od Seems to me the 35mm od would be a good size for the power chasing. Idea was to extend one set or the other rather than starting from scratch. because budget But dilemma was available tube size. can get 32mm od, same as stock. next size up is 38mm od. no 35mm. probably something in between if went to mild steel., but oddly enough can get stainless cheaper In meantime i made this amazing jig that closely replicates a echo floor pan and exhaust system. from potatoe 2 pictures @Roman sent me Back to sizing issue. after changing my mind 12 times. decided to chop up the aftermarket ones and go for a stepped setup. Chopping the collector off and running 38mm tubes from there onwards. 35/38. Because we all want to see that 10,000rpm 2nz anyway for reference 38mm od is what i use on my 4age headers. Need to order some stuff, but had a few leftovers hanging about for a bit of a mock up. looks like should work out all good.
    28 points
  16. The continuing process of remaking the bottom of the B-pillar. I've been doing it in smaller pieces to keep the shape references. This area is almost all hidden when the wood and sills go on anyway.
    27 points
  17. I got the head off today. A rough timeline of events, based on evidence: -Cylinder 2 rod went asplode -Lower part of the broken rod smashed the engine block, front and rear. -The still full throttle engine, probably thanks to my new intake design that has runners pointing to this area (haha damnit) sucked a piece of debris into cylinder 4. -Cylinder 2 piston rotated in the bore slightly while near TDC, and was bonked by one of the intake valves to push it back down a bit. (with very little resistance, as no rod) -No rod left to push it back up, so stayed there and no further damage to #2 valves or head. -The debris that entered cylinder 4 got conked between the piston and the head. Luckily, the piston material took the brunt of it, and it buried mostly into the piston rather than into the head. -Small dent left in the head on cyl 4, straight looking valves everywhere. But will do a leak test on all of them. As possible damage on cyl 2 valves. Project smallblock still looks good to go, so long as I can find all of the 2NZ related bits! The cams are 100% fine, and the head looks 99% fine. I'll give it a good clean out to make sure no debris entered the oil passages. But no evidence of that which I can see. Probably because one of the main oil supply galleries was busted by the conrod, around about the same time as the oil filter said Bon Voyage. Piston #4 close up: Small dent on the head. Will smooth the edges so it wont cause knock. Feeling pretty lucky!
    27 points
  18. Took the working one away to Ohakune. Went well even after the frost so took a spin up to Whakapapa. Annoyingly left the petrol cap at National Park g.a.s and it wasn't there when I went back 90 minutes later so who knows what happened to it. Managed to find a substitute at Horopito Motors after sneaking entry on a Sunday when they were sort-of closed.
    27 points
  19. Things are happening ... capri is getting some love. look at what’s above it on the hoist. met someone who is building a mad Capri, going to help me get it back on the road. In good hands for now.
    27 points
  20. Top one is clearly a Lexus, bottom one is a A32 Maxima?
    26 points
  21. Installing the new gear change cable. In my discussions with Melbar some bits were able to be made to match but some of their standard bits were not exactly the same dimensions as the Fiat original so i asked that they be left oversized and i could smoothing things down as needed, and also accounting for possible wear in the original. This was the tips of both ends Old and bung on the left, new on the right, with the original adjustment nut installed. The tip on this end is the crimp and lives in the hollow end of the gear shift column, i filed that down a wee bit (basically the ridges from crimping) to fit and allow the cable to rotate smoothly with just the right amount of length (rounded the tip a bit more) so that the nut can tighten and the cable can still swivel. That then gets installed in the lock nut and the brass screw and crimp installed in the column change shaft, along with a dampening spring and etc and then that whole lot is attached to the steering column. The Melbar guy said hes never seen such over complicated nonsense. The other (gearbox) end is a bit simpler with a clevis end which they didn't have in a size that suited every dimension required, so went with the one that was right except for didnt fit the 6mm thick stamped pivot arm. I ended up filing the arm down which also lost a fair bit of slop from the slightly rounded top of the arm. I also cut down the boot a bit as it was restricting the throw (as Melbar barry said it would) Thats all back on the van and after a fair bit of adjusting it goes into all the gears again */*/*/*/*/* Next job is to sort out the cooling scenario. Original water pump had fixed fan on its nose, but the Cheap replacement water pump is from a 1500 car that runs an electric fan and a different pulley mounting pattern, so i need to put in an electric fan as well. A 12" pusher is the biggest that i could be sure will fit which isnt that big, but the OEM fan is 10" and doesnt have a shroud so i think it will be OK. Sussing out a layout and attachment Been watching too much Puddin's Fab Shop so had to bust out the 'dimple die' Much better strength and possibly airflow Backside, try to seal off the fan like a reverse shroud so most of teh fans push will go through the rad instead of across it Youmay recognise the alloy sheet from other projects like the sign of the year and the shroud on the 125P ute This is the engine side, with the shroud wrapped around, no screws needed. Had the Radiator shop install a bung for a standard FIAT rad fan temp switch so set up will be the same as the ute (this is the factory set up on it) and as ive retrofitted on the 125 sedan,wagon. Just need to wire it in in yet. Had an overflow knocking around for a while and it will work nicely to replace the factory 'full loss' system (as per pic above) And view from the tunnel - this also has a 'floor' i need to install that basically makes an air ram to the rad and the little carb air box thing as well NOMNOMNOM like a Basking Shark. Will be test driving sooooon and turn it around to make a start on some rust (sliding door to start with) Picked these up from @nzstato (i already have his folder, chur bro!) and ill start making some repair panels like a friken boss while im waiting for paper work etc
    26 points
  22. Finally found Time to get another day working on the car , got the rear fitted and tacked in almost half way there
    25 points
  23. My dear wife gets bored sometimes and then puts her mind to ways of highlighting my vehicular acquisition habits with a particular sarcastic bent. She has produced this “helpful” flowchart for me.
    25 points
  24. and hello again. engine and gearbox out of the kombi now. lets move houses. and man I'm lucky i lowered it. wouldn't have fit into our shed at home if it was still stock height. even with out the engine and gearbox in it i had to let the tires down and push it in. time to play with this windscreen that's been broken for some time. so a night shift and i pushed it out while i was waiting around and then the next day visited Bunnings to get some rust converter/killer. ended up going with quik rust converter/primer. masked that windscreen up and coated the hole windscreen surface with i think it was three layers of this in the end. it seeped through my masking tape which i wasn't over excited about. but ah well lest this has some coats on it. removed that masking tape as you can see and i got busy re masking it and getting it and ready to paint. shout out to uber eats and late night masking missions. shot to Bunnings and got the matching primer to the white paint i had here at home. can said dry time of an hour which was legit, quick scotch between coats and im pretty sure we ended up with about 6 layers of primer on it. filled in a few of those smaller pits from the rust eating away. time to slap some white on. and i used up the rest of my white i had in the can which was about 5 coats. got left 24 hours between coats and i was smart and painted it during the night (night shift) and it took a little bit more to dry. but im stoked to get a bunch of coats of protection on it all. time to slap a screen in. new screen and a new rubber later and we have the window in, the rubber was so dam soft. managed to rip it a couple of times which was less than ideal. but going off my previous windscreen life i will probably replace it before the end of the year. screen done and dusted and my little mate is super stoked to see her kombi out side. now I've gotta wait for my gearbox to get rebuilt and then ill rebuild my engine and put a new crank in it. till next time on adventures with Greg's crappy vws keep safe and enjoy playing with old cars bonus image of little mate looking for the engine
    25 points
  25. Thanks to everyone that has offered. I'm obviously not above accepting charity, as I've been on the receiving end of an incredible amount of it to get this far with things. it's very humbling that anyone would want to help pay for another engine. However I'll be happy to play around with the 1300cc setup for a while. I found all of the 2NZ motor parts needed, I thought I might have thrown some of them out. It looks like all I need is the right length PK belt to suit the addition of the mechanical water pump. Then it'll be good to go once I've swapped the flywheel and clutch over. I havent pulled the old block and the gearbox out yet, but it's not too much work left. The intake manifold has no issues with having the alternator in the high mounted position. The dipstick very nearly fits in the correct spot too. But not quite. I've taken out my VVTI travel stopper, and set the cam to the proper position instead of 1 tooth back. I have confirmed that with the cam in the correct place there are no piston / valve issues. One benefit of the 1300 motor is that there's a little bit more room for the intake, as the block is shorter. So it all sits lower in the engine bay. Looking forward to it!
    24 points
  26. I started building the wiring harness this thing actually needs! Sooooo, let me immediately pivot and tell you a story of ECU's and their mounts. I've got 3 ECU's planned for this thing. To get the thing fired up, leak checked, heat cycled, maybe a couple of drives around I've got a stock super early S6 8bit POS ECU. I've actually got a couple, once with a case and one without. To drive the thing a little longer term, and maybe get a little more jam out of it I've got a Power FC. yes, I can *hear* the eye-rolls, they're antiquated, old, past their used-by, and all that... But, TBH, that still work just fine in a pretty mild setup. Add to this that I've got (borrowed, as they seem to be genuinely hard to buy?) a datalogit to go with it, and there is still pretty active development around tuning these, I should be able to get the thing going pretty well on this :-). In its final form though, I want an e-throttle on it, and I've had a Link Fury kicking around on the shelf for a couple of years, so this will find its way in here. This also has the benefit of a built in wideband controller. I don't really like external wideband controllers that rely on analogue voltages :-/.\ I only want to build one wiring harness for the thing though, so it has to cater for all three conditions. This has driven the design of a harness that uses the original style of connectors at the ECU end, but also quite a few 'auxiliary' connectors in the cabin to cater for mods and the different installations. When I stated building the harness, it was pretty clear that I really, really needed to know where these connectors were going to be mounted. I contemplated just eyeballing it, but know I'd be annoyed later... So, needed to mount all this crap, for all the configurations! Obviously the stock ECU is easy, it just bolts in. Its mounts are actually a little hacked up, but as I'm not going to keep it in there long, eeeeehhhh, its fine. Having this is pretty crucial though, as it let me see how much space is under the passengers kick panel there for mounting all sort of crap. Pleasingly, and quite uncommonly IME, there is actually a heap of space! I scanned the OEM ECU, got a decent mesh out, aligned it in CAD and used it to get the mount point locations. This let me CAD up mounting plates for both the Power FC and the Link Fury. I went a little ham-spec on the Link Fury mount, as its the final one the car will end up with, so should be a nice piece of kit. The Power FC one is a little more 'thrown together', but still tidy enough. Low res version of the scan of the original ECU. Combined with a 2D scan of the power FC backing plate, and a sheet metal replacement modelled up. Quick and dirty. It *just* fit within the work area of the water jet at work (its a baby). Cut it out, folded it up, and screwed it in place of the original ECU cover. After a quick test fit, its a go-er. There is heaps of space on the other side of the new mount for other items too, like the datalogit, and wideband controller. Bit of jiggery-pokery to get everything lined up, drill a few holes... Waiting on the molex connectors for the wideband (14point7 SLC Free 2) to show up so I can finish the wiring. Not worried about the display on it being totally hidden as it'll send its linear output to the datalogit where I can view it on the laptop, and its simulated narrowband output back to the OEM ecu or Power FC via their main connectors. The trim even still fits! Score! ;-). 100% going to have to get/make a torch to go in the holder that looks like an original flare. Right.... One aftermarket ECU down, the other one to go! Little bit more thought involved for this, I wanted to integrate an OEM connector body onto the ECU mount, along with all the auxiliary connections for additional sensors, e throttle, accel pedal, CAN, and the rest. It's kind of a plug-in adaptor and mount all rolled in together. This is what I came up with. I bought an OEM connector housing, and have trimmed the pins (they're only available in a PCB mount version). Have designed and 3d-printed a backshell, and after the wires are soldered to the pins the whole thing will be potted with RT125 or similar. This one actually too two tries, ECU wasn't high enough to clear that plastic wiring channel the first time. Second time was a charm though, and the trim still fits! Have done the wiring design on this... Actually doing the physical wiring on it will be kind of a chore, there is quite a bit too it. Worth it for a nice solid solution though :-). Will start of the wiring of that tomorrow I think, atleast do all the power supply, CAN and any shielded stuff on it what requires annoying splices. Soooooo, I can get to building the actual harness... ummm, soon? Honestly, excited about it :-).
    24 points
  27. So I ended up spending almost what I paid for the car to get it mostly straight again. Justifications: I didn't want to be responsible for its death 'Better the devil you know / The best of the worst you can handle...' I need a car to take to Nats 2023 Some of the cost was covered by all the money I saved by not putting petrol in the Jag for 1.5 years Also, you know, I wanted to contribute to the local economy after the covid downturn. I got it back in May 2022. The panelbeaters fixed it the old fashioned way without replacing panels / using rust repair sections etc. It's better and worse than before - I got a few rust bubbles and dents seen to, both sides of the car were repainted, the new paint is nice but was mixed to the paint code rather than matched to the other panels, the replacement lights and bumper bits are crappy. The car no longer has this pinstripe: (I just thought the post needed a photo and I didn't take any) I got busy refitting bits of trim and fixing stuff for a WOF, and happily the car only failed on an intermittent park light bulb (WOF inspector wasn't satisfied when I demonstrated how to make it work by hitting it like The Fonz). So the Jag is back! I filled it up with some fresh fuel, which cost about a dollar per litre more than the last time the car was on the road. On the day it passed its WOF, I took it to a gig in Morrinsville, which was over 200km of open road driving. The trip computer said 10.1 l/100km for the weekend, but more importantly the tyre vibrations and engine idle quality improved back to their baseline crappiness. I was reminded that the Jag feels a bit disconcerting at speed - the rear end wants to make you swerve like a drunken snake, so you have to keep a grip on the wheel and just use small steering inputs. Here's Jaguar test driver Norman Dewis explaining the very British reason the XJ-S has a rear rollbar despite it making the handling worse. But I have missed these things: The instant response of a cable throttle and a naturally-aspirated engine (I daily a modern turbodiesel) The Jag's cartoonish decadence, absurd priorities and whimsical design Old car smell The motorboat-meets-line-trimmer noises it makes Now I need to get it serviced and get back to all the tasks I put on hold. Tell me how stupid I am:
    24 points
  28. 23 points
  29. This really belongs to my dad but I’d like to chuck a build thread up for those that are interested. This a 68 gt390 Mustang that my dad bought out of the states at the start of the year. He’s always wanted a “bullit” mustang after seeing the movie when it came out, fast forward 50 odd years, and he finally can afford one. The Plan was to get it vinned and ready for the road but unfortunately we ran out of time as he flys out to the states tomorrow with my mum. 2 years ago she was diagnosed with stage 4 bowel cancer at the age of 65 and is now travelling to Houston as a last ditch effort to receive some effective treatment. So my brother and I will be hoping to have the car ready for them when they return in about 12-18 weeks.
    22 points
  30. Thread sidetrack #1: The title for my our house/section might be available in roughly a month and a half. We've just had our finances preapproved again for another 3 months, as it expired. Been worried about getting our finances bounced due to changing interest rates etc. Hence needing to not spend any money etc etc. So that's a relief. Phew. So this is good and bad news for the Echo, it means hopefully the bulk of my housing worries are over sooner than later. But it also leaves me not much time to sort house stuff and do something with the car in the meantime. Once I've moved to the new place I'll not have a shed or anything for a while. So I really need to do something with it in the meantime to either get it mobile or make peace with it being dormant for a fair while yet. I'm thinking if I try fit stronger rods it'll end up having complications / cost / time blow out. If I buy an earlier motor with mechanical waterpump then I dont have 100% surety that it'll all swap easily and there are no complications with the alternator fitment and waterpump belt. So maybe for now I just get another Aqua one for a quick swap. Then when I've got some more cash monies I'll buy an earlier motor and put the good rods in it. Then hopefully get to a few events this coming summer as is, maybe with a little bit lower rev limit. Thread sidetrack #2: Also, a friend put his K24 swapped car up for sale. With aftermarket intake/exhaust, but standard cams. On the dyno this made 225hp at the wheels from 2.4 litres. So thats 93.75hp per litre at the wheels. The echo in its pre-blown up state on 20v throttle and standard exhaust made 141hp at the wheels from 1500cc... Which is 94hp per litre at the wheels. It's official, Prius motor is the new K swap Thread sidetrack #3: One of the reasons I've not worked on the Carina for ages, apart from being distracted with this. Is I really want to put a lighter engine in it. Turbo 1NZ seems like a really good option that will be really light weight, and tick all the boxes. I'd like to run an Altezza 6 speed box behind it, if so. So, I swapped one of my 3S bellhousings for a 1G version. So I've got both to see how they compare in case one's better. I've been meaning to take a bellhousing up to my Dads and sit it on the milling machine with the digital readout, so I can just work out the x and y coordinates of all of the holes. Then I thought... Oh wait I can do that with the printer. So I've got a rough-ish idea of where all of the holes are, and did the same for a 1NZ gearbox casing. The 1NZ bolt pattern is a little bit smaller on outside diameter than the 6 speed stuff. Not sure if that's going to work out good or bad for making an adapter. I'd also need to work out things like how deep the flywheel needs to sit inside it. Might need to shave off quite a bit of the bellhousing and weld something else on. Or something. Dunno yet, its a complex job and I'm feeling out of my depth. But will do some more research on it. The altezza's flywheel face sits quite far from the block, because they run a dual mass flywheel which is very thick. So it might be that the final overall length including new adapter needs to be considerably shorter. Which is also fine, as it pulls the gearbox slightly forward, and the stick is usually a little to rearwards on swaps. Anyone done something like this before? Any tips?
    22 points
  31. Nothing feels better than assembling newly painted parts. Time for some more unadulterated, rear-end porn….!
    22 points
  32. Yea so I decided to schnorkel the inlet as I changed the filter and it had obviously been sucking up a certain amount of soot from the exhaust as they are in closeish proximity. I nicked a bit of 3.5" pipe and got to work. Pics will tell all the story that needs to be told. Need to find a proper silicone joiner and the correct size of clamps but it works well, doesn't project out past the existing stuff and makes it submarine capable. I had run out of black zinc so put some grey poo on the upper, this is now all black zinc as it should be. I also fitted a solar/alternator charger for the aux battery, this works well. I think I probably need to add another solid mount to the exhaust, there is a resonance there at high idle speed which annoys me. But otherwise I am knocking on 15,000kms, all is minty mint.
    22 points
  33. Busy week, buttoned up enough to go off for a tune yesterday. Slight issue with the cam sensor being wired the wrong way round but that was quickly sorted. She made 158hp at the wheels which is about what I was expecting- much more dialed in now and nicer to drive. Have been working away on eliminating all the bumps and rattles- as much as I can anyway. Spent today tidying up the interior, gauge surrounds on, parcel shelf installed and the ECU mounted in behind the centre section of the parcel shelf. Coming together nicely. Will look to book her in for a cert shortly.
    22 points
  34. Tided up this rusty piece of junk that had been sitting in the woodshed for years
    22 points
  35. Done a few things the past week. Scored a new mirror glass from a wrecker mate. Old one was broken, but it was good to be able to smash it out to see how it fitted in order to avoid breaking the replacement one. Got the larger 17/16th master cylinder. Bad thing is its only a 2 port for ABS models, where i have the non ABS lines needing a 3 port MC. Is there a drill bit available to drill an extra hole? I think i read somewhere that its just a square hole with a the tapered cone inserted to seat the flare. But i have seen guys who have the bling braided lines just double stack the banjo fittings on the 1 port. Maybe i can get a custom single banjo to double female flare fitting? Also got a set of whiteline swaybars front and rear, with the adjustable links etc A nismo coppermix twin plate clutch. Supposed to be near stock pedal feel with 590kw of holding capacity. Had this for a while, got it for a good price a while back ecu, 84mm throttle, o2 sensor. I even found this gear shifter boot in my stash. Who knows when i bought this, but mine is stuffed so its a win When i got the car going, the clutch pedal was always creaky and looked out of place. I decided that since im getting older and have no back issues i would karma sutra myself under the dash and have a look. I ended up pulling the pedal out and sure enough, its from a R33. lol, now i remember doing that maybe 12+ years ago. I dont remember it fucking my back when i did it way back then, but it did this time..... For some reason i tried to buy a new clutch and brake pedal set with all the mounts etc a while back, but only the clutch pedal bracket is available. It would seem thats its all just a bit different The last photo shows a spacer on the front of the R33 pedal box. After a LOT of googling, i discovered that the bracket lives on the firewall on the R32. Mine is missing. Either the auto models dont have it, or i ripped it off when i put the ill fitting 33 clutch in. Anyway, in a stroke of luck, i tried yahoo japan and found someone selling the full set Jackpot! Was pretty cheap too. Somebody tried to snake me in the dying seconds but gave up before my autobid ran out. Phew Also includes the throttle pedal stop and footrest which im missing. AND the brake pedal. Because i did the old angle grinder conversion from auto to manwell pedal pad, and its a bit terrible...
    21 points
  36. 21 points
  37. As mentioned in the previous update, once I noticed the engine wasn't happy, I began looking into how bad it was, hoping it was recoverable. The first thing to do was to drain the old oil and refill. According to the sticker on the windscreen, it was last changed 2 years ago and was due last year by time, not miles. I idled the engine to get some heat into the oil, and proceeded to drain it. I remember from my last SD1s that you cannot remove the oil filter with an empty sump or you risk draining the oil pump and having it lose its prime. The oil that came out was really thin for what should be a 20W50 grade. It had a slight metallic sheen, but no glitter and no chunks. It didn't smell overly like petrol, but it did have a smell to it. It was very black. I refilled the engine with the cheapest 20W50 I could get that was still a good brand. I found some Nulon on clearance; perfect. It's not what I would normally run (Penrite HPR30) but there was no point filling the engine with $80 of oil just to see if it was toast or not. $30 oil is more like it. Once the sump had oil in it again, it was just a case of spinning off the old oil filter and fitting the spare Ryco filter I had in my parts stocks. Starting the engine, and already it has made a noticeable change. The oil pressure is still scary slow to rise when cold (the light goes out, but it's many seconds to rise above 0psi on the gauge), but it's higher on the gauge now. I did notice that the idle when in gear was lower than it should be (about 400rpm). It still idled nicely, and about where Effie used it, but the lower RPM meant that the oil pressure was bottom of the gauge. I used the idle screw on the throttlebody to bring the idle up a bit. It's now about 900-1000rpm when at idle in neutral, which is higher than the book says (800rpm), but it means that when the RPM drops in gear, the RPM is still high enough (about 600rpm) that I have oil pressure. It's a bandaid masking a bigger issue, but it works. Between the idle bump and the oil change, at idle in gear, when warm, we now have about 16psi of oil pressure, which is a damn sight better than the 8-10psi before. Which is a damn sight better than what we had (no I don't know why the coolant level light is on, I might need to clean the sensors as the system is full) When revving the engine it goes up to about 30psi at 2000rpm, which is more or less in the ballpark of where it should be (I believe the book says it should be 35psi). It still clatters though. The next diagnostic task was to check the exhaust manifold. I had heard that if there is a leak from the manifold that it can sound like a clattering engine knock. Sure enough, a few of the manifold bolts were barely finger tight. I tightened that up, and it still clatters. I bought a pair of cheap exhaust gaskets and got to work, thinking that maybe the gaskets were blown. Removing the manifolds was easy enough. All the bolts came out fine since they had recently been loose already. I did note there were no locking tabs fitted to the bolts. Even the downpipe joints came undone easy enough, despite some bodging by a previous owner. Well, I guess the gaskets aren't blown then... They just aren't fitted A couple of the ports had traces of sealant on them, but that was it It was pretty obvious that it had been leaking quite badly. There were carbon traces everywhere. Using a series of wire brushes both by hand and on the drill, I cleaned up the mating faces of the heads and manifolds. I also had to do some work with the downpipe flange on the manifolds. I cleaned up the threads with a die. One of the flanges had a replacement stud on it, that had less thread. The thread stopped where the arrow is pointing, meaning the nut couldn't even reach the flange. To compensate, a previous owner had used an oversized nut as a spacer so the actual nut could still tighten down on the thread. That's not my style, so I ran a thread down the rest of the stud The RH side manifold got fitted first. A couple of zip ties through the top bolts holes on either end kept the gasket in place. The gasket was fitted with high temp sealant smeared on both sides, just to aid in sealing. The bolts were fitted with flat and spring washers, to help stop them backing out again. The other manifold needed the gasket cut in the middle. Since it's a one-piece gasket, it would interfere with the dipstick tube. It was easy enough to cut out the center piece with some tin snips, making sure to round the razor-sharp corners off a bit This was also then fitted, with new washers on the bolts and sealant on the ports. I chose to remove the downpipes so I could clean up the flanges. This turned out to be a PITA. With the manifolds fitted, and the exhaust still in place, it was a nightmare trying to get these things to fit again. The flange on the manifold isn't too bad, but the standard joint with the exhaust Y pipe uses a sealing olive and those annoying three bolt clamps to squeeze it together. In hindsight, I would refit the downpipes to the Y pipe before the manifolds, and then fit the manifold with the downpipe loosely bolted to the flange. I wish Rover just used a standard flange and gasket. As the photo above shows, there are a few oil leaks. It appears that the worst two are the valve cover gaskets, and the sump gasket. Both will be replaced when whatever happens to the engine happens. So, did that fix it? No. It still clatters, although the engine is noticeably quieter when running now. The final check I did was the spark plugs. They all look really old, are Champion, and have a weird yellow colour on the ends. Google indicates that the yellow colour is generally due to old and dirty fuel, which would make sense. I put some 98 octane in the car since it came with almost nothing in the tank, and it really woke the engine up and make it run smoother, so I don't know what the seller put in the tank to load it on the truck. I had some NGK plugs in my spares, so I swapped all the plugs out for those. I've never used Champion plugs, and the internet doesn't rate them very highly. So all in all, the engine still clatters. It might be a bit better than it was when I first got the car, more from me masking it with other things than actually fixing it, but it's still there, intermittently, mainly under acceleration now. The engine is running better than it has. It can still be a bit grumpy and I'm not sure the EFI system is quite working 100%, but it's drivable, if you wait until the oil pressure comes up when cold, and can ignore the clattering.
    21 points
  38. Toyota Echo Intake version 6 million As per previous waffling I think it will be beneficial from a reflected wave perspective to keep the intake runners more parallel most of the way up... Then also make them a bit longer. So I modelled this up. So this then had the flow on effect of making the fuel rail situation a little tidier as well, as it pokes in from the other side. So just use the regular tabs on the fuel rail for holding it in place. Also keeps more of the perimeter unobstructed, which might be important now tha the cross sectional area at the entrance is greatly reduced. Also now the fuel line and the injector plugs are flipping upside down too, so it will look a lot less messy. First iteration needs some dimensional changes to fit properly but so far so good. It's got about 10mm clearance the the bonnet which is perhaps a little marginal. (because of longer runners) But see how it goes. I still havent figured out how to print the nylon stuff properly yet, might need to wait until I've got some $$ to buy a dehydrator box. But I'll try get the design sorted in PLA for the moment anyway.
    21 points
  39. Thanks to the replies in the tech spam thread which basically reinforced what I was thinking, which is it doesn't have enough air flow and needs a better fan I thought I'll live with the fan noise if that means I can actually drive it So I embarked on the mission of finding an engine driven fan that fits Found the one I wanted on an NZ website , sweet, ordered it. Nope, " no stock sorry" Bugger. Found a different supplier who had one, ordered off their website "Sorry, no stock, they might be here in 3 weeks? " Poos. Local guy had a plastic flex fan , I didn't want one of those as they are a lot deeper but meh I'll give it a shot , chucked it on, needed a bigger spacer so the blade cleared the alternator. spent ages rummaging around for some bolts Started it, ran for a bit, moves heaps of air, good Gave it a rev to about 2500, the inch or so clearance at the bottom became 0 clearance and the fan hit the tank and broke the tip off one blade Ah yes that's why I hate these fans Luckily no damage to the radiator apart from some dinged fins Found a stock 245 steel fan I had in a box under the house, chucked that on, it will do for now and I'll find the one I want I think with a shroud on it should be OK, the mechanical fans move heaps more air. It still creeps up at idle in the shed but no shroud and a slower fan speed than stock due to pulley sizes are the reasons I think
    20 points
  40. bits and pieces have arrived for the motor (still bits to come) but most importantly the pistons have ..so I can putva rod and pistion together and check the compression ratio to see if I need to deck the block.. turns out it's 8.263 -1 .. I'm pretty happy happy with that to run boost.. also huge thanks to nismo-Capri for rods... and info on porting heads... that will be next on the list . while I wait for some bit to turn up.
    20 points
  41. The paint finally cured enough to give it a machine buff yesterday and the Muzzy is now back home. Needs a bloody good bath and a final hand polish before I start the reassembly, but to say that I am chuffed with the outcome would be an understatement. In other news I borrowed two hotwires from Grant. They aren't my first choice of wheel for the Mustang, but at least they have given me a feel for what the car will look like back on classic 15 inch diameter wheels. The borrowed wheels are both 7J with a 205/60/15 on the front and a 225/60/15 on the back. I'm aiming for the same size tyres but will run a 8J on the back just to fill the arch a bit more. Thanks for looking.
    20 points
  42. Sorry to say but I think you've done your snorkel incorrectly It's meant to be on the a pillar so it blocks your vision, faces your ear so all the turbo noises go directly into your brain , and you're meant to weld a laser cut logo into the end of the 4" pipe so it blocks off most of the flow
    20 points
  43. Richie is a good cunt. Not only did he find me a good set of wheels on marketplace, he went to Wellington and checked them out for me, then he bought them for me. Then he bought them to auckland for me. I take back some of the things I said about him. SSR MS1s. 19x 8.5 +25 front 19x 9.5 +22 rear. Fucking stoked. Now it really really needs to come down.
    19 points
  44. Finally had some time to get the old motor out. I was busy just dealing with the nuts and bolts of the situation, undoing things etc... It wasnt until the motor was completely out, that I had a look at the back side of the block and had a hearty chuckle So I got the motor and gearbox out, split the gearbox off. Then I wanted to get the piston and the top half of the rod out, to see if there's any evidence of how/why the rod broke. So I used an extension bar and tapped the piston up until it popped out. Well, part of it anyway... And then I laughed some more, oh man, I wasnt expecting that carnage! I cant find the wrist pin or the top of the rod anywhere. I suspect I might have to go for a long walk up the road to go find it. So one concerning thing about this, is now I'm not sure what broke first. If the rod broke and caused the damage, that's fine. Easy, just put stronger rods in. But it looks like the piston broke along the line of the oil return holes from the oil control rings: Which maybe makes me think that the piston sorta... fell in half. Then caused rod carnage. However I'm thinking this is less likely, based on the lack of damage to the cylinder head. Either way, it might be a good idea to drill some tiny chamfers on the oil holes next time for stress relief. But I'm not sure if you can get a drill anywhere near it while the piston is intact. So, hopefully the rods are the problem and not this haha. Maybe the remaining 3 pistons and rods might show some extra clues.
    19 points
  45. Yea so I have set up a budget recording studio in my shed, it works pretty well. I have been playing with getting a good sound when recording acoustic guitar. My main go to acoustic is a K. Yairi that I bought brand new in 1992. It has amazing looks, sound and playability, but access to the battery for the pickup has always been a drag, you have to loosen off the strings and get a fat hand in through the soundhole. Also if it is left plugged in it will drain the battery. So I ordered a Gotoh panel mount battery box and got to work. This was pretty scary as this guitar is pretty much my most prized possession. All seems good. I added a switch to isolate the battery as well, so if I leave it overnight plugged in and set up it will still work the next day...
    19 points
  46. Some crane action for yiz; That's a massive Mikuni bus heater that I bought to heat the lined and insulated bit of the shed. It cost $100, still had half a tank of diesel in it, they are big tanks so I am probably at a net profit.
    19 points
  47. Mama got some new shoes today. Just waiting for the knock off spinners to arrive to complete the look. I've now got heaps of fender gap so I'll be able to dial in a bit of low which will make my heart sing. Before and after shots:
    19 points
  48. Slightly out of sequence with my thread guys, just bear with me. After failing miserably to identify the telescopic shocks I’d used to replace the lever action shocks some 40 plus years ago I settled on a pair of aftermarket EA Falcon shocks. To be honest they were cheap new/old stock, (i. e. the EA is not the most popular ‘Coon ever made) and they were blue! Thought I’d use as much as the original bracketry as I could. Cleaned up the old spring pads. Getting tight for room allowing access to the U bolts… Some CAD work… A bit more mocking up…. Had to notch the inside mount to give access to the U bolt nuts . Then started to stitch it all together. In true oldschool fashion I decided I didn’t like the result, spat the dummy, and bought the steel to make larger spring pads. I then cut the mounts off and attached them to the new pads. A quick mock-up and it works for me.
    19 points
  49. Fitted up a few of the 14 n 1 system. oil pressure, water temp, boost hooked up. Volts is picked up via power hook up. waiting for my fuel T adaptor to arrive for the fuel pressure sensor. dropped the oil, cut the filter open. there are a few tiny specks in there, but no flakes. running around mid to high 40psi oil pressure at idle. need to get hold of a timing light to check the timing.
    18 points
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