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  1. This showed up at home today - pretty happy with how tidy it is, certainly not mint, but I would have been shocked if it was. Flat battery, no engine coolant and a little exhaust leak will be the first little jobs to do, along with oil change and filters too. Chatted to a local compliance place that will do a pre compliance check over and point out any likely repairs needed, before doing a full on compliance inspection so will try get it to them in the next week or two
    53 points
  2. So it's been roughly 6 months and 5000kms, I thought I would do a situation report; It's fucking amazeballs. It's not stupidly big so I can use it as a daily no problem, although I do need to choose my parking spots a bit carefully. It's still big enough and industrial enough to make sure that merging like a zip is a given. It's actually really comfortable to drive, plus it's rock solid on the road. It will happily sit at 100 or so no problem. I'm getting on average 12.5l/100km, not amazing but not bad either. It is pretty lively off the mark so a reasonable balance. It takes a shitload of stuff. I put 45 sheets of 12mm ply on it the other day, 750 or 800kg, no problem. The deck is also big enough to take sizable items, it's way better than the townace for that. It's still quite noisy, I must find some vinyl and redo the floor with some deadening. I put some extra speakers on the dash that I got from the dump shop for $6, this helps me hear my audiobooks a bit better. Last night I installed a wee powered sub, now music is pretty listenable too. The wiring situation under the dash is getting stupid, I actually bought some distribution blocks today so I can remove the splice upon splice of power wires that power the stereo/sub/egt/cb/etc etc. It's got to the point even I don't know what's powering what. The engine rattle is still there but seems not to be an issue, I'll run it till it blows up I guess. But overall I am super happy with it, it is so incredibly practical. Its probably the best thing I have ever built. PFT, here it tonight loaded up with shite;
    49 points
  3. A few things have happened since the above post, like reassembling and putting the engine and box back in the car. That happened maybe 3 weeks ago, and this weekend we tuned it. Long story short, it made 148hp at the hubs, it peaks then holds flat until limiter at just over 8k. Feels great in car. Here's some videos. This is on the local test track A quick 3rd gear motorway pulll from about 90km/h. Huge huge thanks must go to @Lithfor making the trip up to fastidiously tune the car, it drives really nicely, behaves well at all loads/conditions encountered so far and is just generally a pleasure to hoon around in.
    41 points
  4. right so, its all back together. but first, new clutch. its a niteparts designed unit which holds heaps of torque but drives like a normal car. this thing is huge. check out the friction plate on top of the Giken twin plate unit! 20210713_184945 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_184938 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-44-05 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_183646 by sheepers, on Flickr right so then i put the motor back in the car. had to mod the turbo dump pipe. also had to mod the intercooler piping by the throttle body to include a new larger blow off valve. other things done include all new pipe work to and from the turbo and all new hoses for the wastegate. im waiting on a new intercooler which should be here in a couple of weeks too. and tonight i took it for a drive round the block, so far so good. noo doortz though as it needs to be tuned with the new turbo. its booked on the dyno on the 6th of August. 2021-07-21_08-32-36 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-14 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-24 by sheepers, on Flickr
    41 points
  5. Far out! November last year was the last time I had tinkered away on this project. Time flies!!! Well both Hannah and I have been pretty busy with various things like having to get the housetruck finished off and road legal for sale and with that gone we had to build a place to live. The mezzanine build took a fair whack of time. That's all pretty much done, well at least to a point that we can happily live up there. I started losing a feel for time over summer with all that going on. Then a Micra/March turned up. A simple, cheap run about while the Imp is off the road eh. Then another Micra... and another. Oh - so now these are projects are they? FFS. Oh hey...what's that? Is that a Bedford TK truck in the yard. But hang on.. you've already got 4 other vehicles to play with, not to mention the old 4wd Hiace van that's getting bit rusty around the edges. Well screw all them. I just needed to get my 'flat six fix' so I dug out all the bits that had been hibernating under the bench and had some fun piecing them together in a sort of organised fashion on the table... Now where does this bit go?.... After having some fun taking photos I stashed some of the parts like the heads, cam gear, pistons etc that I wont need for a while back under the bench until needed. I had to confront a mini stumbling block I had with the oil pump drive sprockets. There is one small sprocket that slides onto the hub of a larger one and needed to be fixed in place. My initial thoughts were to weld it but I was worried that it would warp and cup. I sized it up for possibly bolting it in place using small cap screws but there just wasn't enough room between the chain and the hub, even for small 4mm screws. Welding it was going to have to be. I would get some advice though beforehand. But first I wanted to add a very slight taper to the teeth so there would be no sharp square edges that could potentially catch and rub against the inside of the chain plates. 3 of the sprockets were easy enough to pop in the lathe and give them a tickle with a flap disc. But the smallest I had to whip up a little hub to clamp it on... Trying to take a photo with one hand while holding an angle grinder in the other... Then sitting in front of the fire and cleaning off any sharp edges... Now I had sprockets I was happy with I had to confront my welding issue. I popped over the hill and chatted to another engineer I know who has a lot more experience with welding of such things than me. He pretty much told me what I had already guessed and I decided to just go for it. But just to be sure I thought it prudent to machine up a fake sprocket and hub to see how they faired when welded. There was no cupping evident so I went ahead with the sprocket. First thing though was to heat both parts up gently. Not too hot. Just hot enough that I could touch them but not get burnt... This way the welding could be quick and light without a mass of steel sucking the heat. But not so hot that shrinkage could be an issue either. I used the little tig welding table I had built ages ago for more comfort when doing such jobs... I'm certainly not a super neat tig welder like some artists out there (and never will be with only having decent sight out of one eye so judging the distance can be an issue) so I was very happy with the result and super happy that nothing pulled.. With this part finished I could concentrate on the chain tensioner design. I had a few ideas and had amassed a few bits to tinker with.... Being that the chains are under constant load and only turning a pump the tensioners are really only needed to stop excessive slap. Nothing to do with timing changes like a cam chain. I had two Datsun A12 tensioners to try out but no matter how I arranged them they conflicted with each other and there was no room for mounting bolts where I needed them.. So I tried out some Mazda/ford 2.0 duratec tensioners and they show great promise... I will make mounting blocks to suit and knock this part of the build on the head! Then onto finishing the bellhousing Hopefully some more updates soon although we have also started pulling one of the Micras down for the big swapsie game but that is mainly Hannah's project so I can keep working on this as I can.
    41 points
  6. Once upon a time, @Slacker_Sam. purchased yet another car, in an unfinished state as per this photo taken 20 years ago: Image © Sams Mum circa 2016? All Rights Reserved . "Little Sam and his new white sneakers and motorcar" Click photo for more The car - a 1972 Triumph 2.5 PI Estate in White(?) with manwell 4 speed + O/D, PI spec interior, injection system missing and replaced with carby@sentradave SUs, went into storage in 2016 after sitting for 16 years in an unfinished state at Woodburn Air Base. Cue 2020. Sam found another similar car needing less work and decided to offload this one. Sam lives at the top of the South Island and I live in the busy sh*thole of Auckland, so logistics were going to be fun. Buying cars unseen knowing full well they haven't been on the road since 2000 is what makes an adventure so a deal was done. What was needed however was some work to make a journey under its own steam. Enter THE HERO. A mythological and legendary figure of divine descent endowed with great strength and ability, an illustrious warrior, a person admired for achievements and noble qualities. Enter @yoeddynz and trusty sidekick @Hannah The car was delivered to the Hero's bat-cave and an assessment was done revealing the following treasures: Pre-cut inspection holes Factree weight reduction Speed holes Grot Further weight reduction was also found, the motor didn't run, the tyres were mush, the interior was in 1000 pieces and god knows what else. Needless to say I was optimistic.... Stay tuned for the next time I have half an hour to bring you the next exiting episode of Triumphant Estate Restoration!
    39 points
  7. its all coming together nicely. i had a fault with the idle speed controller which turned out to be a short in the loom so i fixed that. i needed more travel in the clutch to fully disengage it so i changed the master to a 13/16 bore and its perfect now. honestly the clutch is like your driving a corolla, its that good. so i have been doing some Ks in it to bed the clutch before the dyno on Friday and everything is working perfectly, im super stoked with it all. i cant really give it any stick because the tune is wrong for this turbo and it might shit itself so im being gentle. which sucks. the other thing i did was make a tool to aid adjusting the cams during the dyno session on firday. its really hard to see what your doing and its hard to accurately adjust them so im hoping this tool will make life easier. 2021-08-01_04-21-50 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-08-01_04-21-42 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-08-01_04-21-26 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-08-01_04-21-33 by sheepers, on Flickr
    33 points
  8. I cut the hardboard to size splitting it in two to allow me to tuck it into the roof gap. The cross brace could then be used to cover the seam between the two pieces. I used some ados ultra strength spray adhesive to glue the felt onto the hardwood and tucked it around the sides before sliding it back into place. Really pleased with the result, big improvement over what I had and only cost $70 in materials.
    33 points
  9. Fenders Painted and Fitted Up. Fitted up a moon disc to the alloy wheel too. And the Painted peaked bonnet.
    32 points
  10. Had to collect the 125 from gc@nzstato offsite storage facility so he can put his own stuff in it. First time these have been together. Dropped the super heavy (C beam, 0.25" plate and angle iron) rear bumper/towbar that some PO had added (no rear bumper from factory!) and sanded the paint on the valance/ rear quarters behind it. Aaaand went over a few other patches again and so thats the last* of the maroon paint and its primer. Gave the cab a wipe down . Then gave the side i see the most a wizz with the polisher Not bad!
    32 points
  11. Fire in the hole four bolts half wound in from bellhousing side and rest onto mounts. you can just see in photo sump is fouling on the removable stone guard which is holding engine up. Test fit of drivers half of bonnet shows its fouling by hopefully the same amount it needs to drop down. the untrained eye says the carbs will fit. fingers crossed
    31 points
  12. It's been a long while since the last post and I don't feel like I've done enough for a full post yet, but I do want to put something up to show what I've been working on and to say that neither me nor the project is dead yet. I had typed out a nice post but then the browser crashed and I lost all of it so this might be a bit less polished than usual as I try to rush it out. I carried on from the driver's side guard lip by doing the same to the passenger's side. It didn't take long to get the lip cut out and the new one tacked in. You've seen this all before so I shan't write too much about it. No sooner had I tacked it in, that half the bloody car fell off in my lap! I let myself be convinced by those less directly invested that this would be the best way to tackle the whole thing. To be clear, I agree with them, but damn is it not confronting to see it on the floor like that. This way I can get good access to properly panel beat all the welds, as well and ensure all the inaccessible cavities are properly sealed up and corrosion protected before I put it all back together. For example, see here the bare metal and (house) paint flaking off the inside of the lower window panel. I can paint this up properly and have total piece of mind when I weld the quarter panel back on. You can see also how much better access I have to cleaning up the weld on the wheel tub as well. With the quarter off, I had a nice easy down hand weld to get the arch final welded, then I stripped the panel inside and out. I then spend the next 50 hours panel beating the lower rear corner to clean up the patch welds and sharpen up the body lines that run back from the rear of the wheel arch. It's sitting with a guide coat at the moment so it looks far more wavy than it is. The welds themselves are pretty hard to spot at this stage if you didn't know they're there. I'm not very good at it but I'm enjoying the process. I still have the whole of wheel arch weld itself to handle as well, hence not feeling like enough progress to warrant a full post. Hopefully by the next post I'll have it welded back on the car and looking straight as an arrow. Here's wishing everyone a happy new year since it will likely be after that at this stage. Cheers.
    31 points
  13. Runner system pattern complete. Re sprayed everything with the better mould release. All patterns ready to go now. Next will be testing out the new sand resin system to figure out ratios and work times. Dont really want to go all in with a 200kg batch first go!
    29 points
  14. Steering column shortened, painted everything, got a clamp type u joint. now have steering again which I find useful
    29 points
  15. We left our story with the discovery of a few tiny little rust holes. Our Hero @yoeddynz had his work cut out for him (a bit like the rust he found) I don't actually know what he did TBH, but he did send me some photos so I'll make my own story which is all 100% correct at time of publication*: 1. ROOF Holes previously found enbiggened, Alex played with a brass pencil and inserted lots of old rust filings into the hole he found from a Hillman Imp. Then he and added some black stuff and steel. Also tinted windows with plastic. Pleased with himself, he repeated the exercise on the other side also, while making some wooden boxes for his quad. A professional jigsaw enthusiast, he had no problems finding a piece of metal that fitted the exact hole he had cut out earlier. Metal glue applied to ensure it won't fall out. Note the colour -matched black & decker suspension adjustment tool. He then found two more pieces of steel and repeated the process on the co-pilot side, adding curtains to the passenger compartment also. The pencil now balanced on the roof. Happy with his efforts, he made more holes above the boot to be able to have another go Suck/blow/suck/blow repeat until tender and golden. All shiny and water-tight A spray of some black stuff for protection and that'll do for now. Gosh what a magic fixer guy! Also the observant of you will note that @Slacker_Sam. had found some brand new tyres and generously fitted them to make moving the car somewhat easier and safer. Tune in next time for more rust discovery, broken stuff and much excite. *could be?
    29 points
  16. My son has wanted a cubby house / tiny house for ages. According to him it needed a Mezzanine, to look old fashioned, and be good for hiding out in. This is as close to the design brief as I could manage.
    28 points
  17. Rebuilt the old cnc router. Runs heaps more reliably now. Brought some 50x50x3 aluminium extrusion at put it to work on some brackets. Finished and painted. With the Valves and sensor fitted. Mounted into the trunk.
    28 points
  18. I've been printing some proper trumpets from HIPS material but they take about a day each. Currently two done, two to go. So no more glow in the dark PLA... Since I'm definitely not ever going to use the standard ECU anymore I've also been tidying up the loom a bit on both sides of the firewall. Chopped out a whole bunch of crap that doesnt need to be there anymore. Also put in my EarthX battery so thats about 8kg lighter from memory. On the whole I think I'm gonna try make the engine bay look tidy as best I can, and hopefully the lessons from this will flow on to future projects. I bought some Rays Engineering GR-N wheels which look beaten up to shit. But should come up alright and were a good price. Theyre still cast wheels but even so, are a little over half the weight of the ROH wheels haha. Currently in Carterton so if anyone's down that way and coming up to Waikato, let me know if you are keen on some $$$ to deliver some wheels! I've decided that even if I try do a fancy loom it's still going to look very busy with shit draped everywhere. Because there's just a lot going on. So a much easier solution that suits my lack of wiring skills is to make some cable trays that hid everything. This way it's easy to modify later if I want to add extra wiring, and still gives some good mechanical protection etc. So starting on the injector area and will run the VVTI solenoid wires through here too. It will have a top cover piece. But you get the idea. Will do the same for the other main wiring paths along the engine. I want it to hug the contours of the head as best possible, and be as slim/short as possible so it's still a few iterations from finished. Also at some point I will print another manifold that flips the throttles the other way up, so it hides the throttle cable arrangement a bit better.
    28 points
  19. Time to have another go Got almost a ton of sand, new resin system and a new insulating spray for the moulds (meant to help big thin castings). Planning to use a concrete mixer to do larger batches. Doing some repairs to the damaged patterns. Drilled holes in the print and injected concrete epoxy. Also adding a few bond on thread plates to hopefully get a slide hammer on.
    27 points
  20. Been looking at buying a jeep j20 ute for a few years , now that I've started a family I thought its time to get a sensible family wagon.. she's a jap import un-complied wagon with a blown up dinosaur emissions strangled 360 amc v8. first thing is an engine conversion, please give me your thoughts on what would be a good swap *I have a 15b toyota diesel 4.1L turbo 4 cylinder that I have priced up a 12mm 200cc pump for $2200 and a g-turbo red wheel for $2800 which should give good torque. *LS? *hemi? can buy late model with 4wd auto tranny. *duramax? don't want to spend more than 10K on parts for the swap if possible.
    27 points
  21. BACKSTORY Once upon a time - 1983 in fact, Auckland was the host of the New Zealand Motor show. All the manufacturers displayed their new offerings, including BMW with their new E30 3 Series BMW. Germany new the show as happening and sent out a top of the range 323i coupe, in hellrot red, with M-Sport interior, M stickers and a slightly breathed upon M20B23 motor with 5 speed transmission, just to give the press something a little more spicy than the average 323i, but not enough to raise alarm bells. The car went through a couple of owners until it ended up in a friends ownership in the early 90s. The car served the owner @Mr Burns's senior for a number of years. He was a spirited driver and enjoyed using the car to its full potential, including every trip to the shops for milk, or 4 up on family holidays around the country. By the early 2000s, as with most early e30s, there was more rust holding the car together than steel, so a running gear transplant was arranged into a 1984 4 door sedan and the old body was sent away. The blue sedan in better days. The 'new' sedan was daylied for a few years, until the same fate bestowed it's chassis. It was then parked up under a hedge for 15 years and forgotten about. Neglected The rusted car came into my possession at the sad passing of Mr Burns's senior, as reg had sadly lapsed, it hadn't run in an age. It was trailered and parked in my storage shed as a 'one day' project.
    27 points
  22. I did not complete the two week challenge but I'm still chipping away. Aidan at Pine Engineering sent me these photos of the br-x completed last night @BobbyBreeze was kind enough to lend me a centre cap to replicate also which are just off being anodized I have a new set of Yokohama A539 in 175/60 and 185/60 at home ready to go also
    26 points
  23. Last few weeks have been productive..... Floor in, panels straightened and fitted, car dropped to painter to be rubbed back and fully primed and undersealed. It's now sitting at home, rust free and ready for seam sealing and getting it on it's wheels to mock up the engine.......
    26 points
  24. Made up a door template from the good car. Fits 'OK' in the project for a start. I added the upper parts too to check the vertical positioning. I sent some pics to the wood man and he said it's not the worst he's seen so I suppose that's good? Also took the new one out for a breakfast run and tour of some of Rod Clifton's tractor patch.
    26 points
  25. Two nites in a row I went and looked at it and just didn’t know where to start. There’s plenty of pretty complex shapes and curves to tackle. Today I bit my lip and sunk the grinder into it! None of this really needs to be finished too flash unless it’s an edge or close to the skin. The grey side isn’t seen at all. Can’t imagine the car will have the bonnet attached at repair cert time either. Then mint.16 came and got my Honda monkey bike going after over a year so that slowed progression a bit, but yay!
    26 points
  26. Few less holes in hood frame
    25 points
  27. Today was the warmest day we’ve had in a while so I rushed home and got a few coats of etch on
    24 points
  28. Remember how my master cylinder was rooted and pulled all the fluid into the booster? shane at powerstop brakes cleaned it up, reassembled and tested it after another shop tore it apart and quoted the earth to repair. He’s sleeving the master for me too. I’ve ordered another pcv valve. super stoked, Look him up for classic and modern/ABS brake solutions!
    23 points
  29. I didn't want an Aux cord floating about so I went and grabbed a bluetooth adapter. This one from Logitech had good reviews and required 5V power so I hacked up an old 12V usb converter. I needed to access the pairing button on the top when it was installed so I drilled a hole to suit and tucked the adapter underneath the head unit. I then tidied up all the wiring, replaced the 4 inch speakers and installed everything in the car. Really pleased with the result. You can switch between bluetooth and AM radio with the tape insert button and the bluetooth unit automatically pairs with my phone when I turn the ignition on. Sound quality is not bad considering the setup, goes hard for what it is etc.
    23 points
  30. More scrappy part-finished hood frame shiz.
    23 points
  31. Its moving day.... Here it will be sit for some undetermined amount of time... I may be able to get the wheels/tyres refurbed while it stays in storage but there wont be much of an update on this until I build my new shed. Been a good fun project so far and am itching to get the rest of it completed and on the road...
    22 points
  32. It’s still progress even if it’s to cold to do physical work on it right? Ah shit, wet mangled box phew not rooted! Some damage to the tulip/deck filler/Dutchman panel but easy fix. even included a bonus fancy Honda trans mount with an electrical sensor some poor sap will be waiting for on a 2day service! This only took a week to arrive!
    22 points
  33. It's still not 100% but I'm not gonna lie I'm stoked with how this is going to end up looking (Wont be white for final version)
    21 points
  34. Unboxed the lower quarter piece to test fit. Not too bad but I think the B-pillar needs some persuasion. I'm going to make a pattern off the good car for a comparison (although I don't know for sue if that is exactly right either). This wood stuff seems easier than making steel skins up though
    21 points
  35. With the driveshaft all fresh and clean, all I needed to do was crawl under the car and refit it. While under there though, I thought it prudent to replace the last remaining fluids. Refitting the driveshaft was easy enough. I reused the old bolts but invested in some new locknuts to secure them. It turned out that the new center bearing has different sized captive nuts, so the old bolts wouldn't work. I got fed up with having to guess and buy bolts one by one, as all my stocks of spare bolts are of course Metric, and the Marina is Imperial, so ended up buying a kit of various sized Imperial nuts, bolts and washers from Trademe. With the driveshaft completely refitted I moved on to changing the driveline fluids. Both the gearbox and diff call for a GL5 EP90, which as it turns out, is a bit harder to find locally. I chose to go with a Castrol Axle EPX 80W90 instead, which is a GL5 spec EP oil. The gearbox was easy to drain and fill. The fill plug, which you should remove first, is on the RH side. Just a normal imperial square, as is the drain plug on the bottom. The old fluid, which has been in there for at least 25 years, wasn't as bad as it could be. It had a few years to settle at the bottom and was thick with a dark grey hue, that later changed to a dark brown. No chunks though, so that's a win. I pumped some fresh fluid through to help shift anything sitting on the bottom, and refit the drain plug. Just a smidgen over 1L was pumped into the box, and when it started to dribble out I refit the fill plug. A quick clean and that part of the job was done. Next was the rear diff. This was a bit of a pain as there is no drain plug, only a large fill plug. I tried a large syringe but it was taking way too long, so not wanting to be defeated, I grabbed the handheld vacuum bleeder. And I'll be, it worked a treat. Still slow because the waste fluid bottle is only about 100mls, but it flowed easily after a few pumps of the handle. After getting as much as I could out, which was about 10 bottles of gross, almost black, stinky fluid that had likely been in there since it was built almost 50 years ago, I filled it with about 1L of fresh new fluid. Once again, refit the fill plug, clean it off and done. Now that I had the driveshaft in, I could do something that hadn't happened in a VERY long time.... see if the driveline works. The first step was to install the pedal rubbers Mmm fresh. I did that now, because it's way easier to do without the seat installed, which was next on the list. What does having a seat installed mean? Sitting making vroom vroom noises of course! Then I fired the engine up, put it into gear, and eased the clutch out. It works! For the first time in 10-25 years, the hubs spun under their own power. Ignore the angry tractor idle, I really need to warm it up and give it a decent run, but I can't do that until we are out of the garage. So, when is that I hear you ask. Well, the wheels need to go off and be blasted and powder coated, and then the new tyres can be fitted. Once that's done, on the car they go, and the car can FINALLY come down off the stands it's been on since I got it. For now, I'll just be here reading my original Leyland Australia parts catalogue from 1975 Which is pretty handy really, since it shows me how things like the heater/vent ducting go together since currently it's all in a box and I had no idea. It's completely different to the Uk cars, and the heater box is actually the same as the Aus built Mini Clubman of the time. Soon.
    20 points
  36. Gave the crabs a birthday, both seemed to be weeping gas from the between the top plate that the floats attach to. Cleaned everything and reassembled. Also installed a new set of plugs, really need to buy some leads, these fuckers must be nearly twenty years old. Anyway, one of the plugs was only finger tight and a couple had oil stains around the thread? Maybe those rings are stuffed? When I had it on the bench, I re torqued all the head studs, very carefully as to not pull any out of the magnesium engine case. After a quick test of oil pressure, it started up okay, needed a small clutch adjustment,warmed it up around the block, clutch works so nice, like butter, very pleased. On return, it was idling a bit fast, which is a pain. This engine must be warm to set the carbs. Disconnect the throttle linkage completely, and get both carbs to match. Got both down to 2-2and a bit on the air meter. It's never run this smooth, imagine if I could actually tune the Dells! My son found this for me in a thrift shop, I've been looking for one for a while. To go with my og 90s thrasher sticker. Stoked. And yes it's already leaking!!! Quite badly! Seems to be mostly the cylinders, between the case on side1-2, and from between the head on 3-4? Dogs will hunt! Still really pleased with the work done, clutch works well, flywheel hasn't fallen off, I did it to spec but man, if that was 270lbs it musta been 4 or 500 when I took it off. Engine mounts are definitely softer, it does not like hard launch's. All the axle tramp! Not to worried, I said I'll renovate the house next and I'm not driving it daily but it's nice to have it ready it go.
    20 points
  37. So after seeing the gumboot rally guys planning a hektik drive from chch to Hanmer and back over the course of a weekend in a few months, it got a few of us thinking, we can do better than this. Much better. So thinking top gear spec shit car Roady. In undie 500 fashion, purchasing cars for less than $500 to complete a full loop of the south island over 3 days. In teams of 2. Challenging ourselves to do it as cheap as possible. Think camping/sleeping in cars spec. We'll come up with a points system for most unreliable brands getting extra points, frugalness, selling at the end of the trip etc. This is by no means a fundraising type thing. Just a bunch of us who want to take shithouse cars round the south island to show it can be done. If anyone is interested in joining, please make yourself known below. Aiming for sometime in the Xmas holidays as it's when most of us will have time off. Chur.
    19 points
  38. Popped into the infamous Kaikoura kart track on my way back up 4.1 definitely has given her a bit more pep. Interested to see if the fuel mileage differs much when I fill up tomorrow (didn't want excess weight getting onto ferry)
    19 points
  39. And fast forward to yesterday, I stripped out the interior, loaded up the van with some NOS panels from my "stock", Loaded in the trailer and took it to my panel guy who did the Mk1 for me - exciting!
    19 points
  40. Trans adapter time. As mentioned earlier the 722.6 doesn't bolt up to a M180/M127/M129/M130 engine even through the bolt patterns look very similar (with the inline engine version of a 722.6 bellhousing at least). So I had a conundrum on how to go about this, taking into consideration things like starter location, ring gear location, keeping things concentric, making sure the torque convertor is seated once its all together etc. There's several things that ended up providing the answer for me. Firstly the starter; On the M130 the starter is on the right hand side of the engine, the factory sandwich plate that sits between the engine and gearbox has a provision for the starter. however on the 722.6 trans the starter clearance bulge is on the the left hand side. So which side of the motor do you want your starter? if you scroll up a post of two you'll see the oil filter housing sits on the left hand side of the motor, right where the starter would be, so you can't make use of the 722.6s starter mount. In which case you're now using the engines OG starter, which means you'll want to keep the ring gear in the original location... So I yoinked the manual trans off that engine and too some measurements and drew some circles in Fusion360 Then realized I'd mucked up the overall diameter of the thing, luckily this was prior to sending away files to the laser cutters. Sent some files off and they sent back some lumps of metal Have a 12mm spacer for the end of the crank, and a 3mm thick flexplate, plan is to scavenge one of the ring gears off the manual flywheels I have and weld that to the flexplate. I spent a rainy Sunday attempting to measure the bolt pattern for both the engine and the trans and had a test piece cut out of 3mm plate at the same time (the disc on the left) if my measurements were right I was going to get a thicker one cut and run that but you can see from the ticks and crosses on it only about a 1/3 of the holes lined up. Ended up getting a 12mm thick piece laser cut (the disc on the right) that utilized one of the factory dowel pins on the trans, that was to be my starting point. clamped precariously in place, the OD was large enough to blank off the now unneeded starter bulge on the left hand side Went around and marked out the holes I'd be using that didn't clash with any of the holes I would need on the sandwich plate, tapped one of them using the shitty tap set I had before buying a Volkel tap set based on someone on heres recommendation, holy moley did that improve my outlook on life. Whoever made that recommendation deserves an ice cream. Ended up here: Jealous of my phone? Whilst doing that the torque convertor was sitting on the bench next to the trans, at some point I moved the trans and knocked the converter onto the floor which caused a drama for later on but we won't talk about that. Did some maths at this point. Decided if I wanted to run a 12mm thick adapter plate I'd need to reduce the thickness of the sandwich plate by ~11mm, a buddy came through and was able to do that for me, I have a spare plate if this doesn't work out, comparing the two post surgery: That's the relatively easy side done, next step was to join that to the engine whilst keeping the trans concentric to the crank (well as much as I could anyway). There's a small win here in that the OD of the pilot on the torque convertor is the same as the ID on the end of that crank where the pilot bearing would normally go for the original manual trans (35mm). I carried this measurement over to the ID of the crank spacer so the Torque convertor could locate on it, the spacer picks up the OG dowel pin on the end of the crank so based on that assumption of it being a straight line I bolted the spacer up to the crank and slid the trans up to it, docking the torque convertor pilot in the hole. Took a brave pill and wiggled it so the trans looked straight up and down against the engine, rather than tipped to one side, and marked out the two holes for the starter then drilled and tapped those. Bolted everything back together, so far everything is lining up. took the trans off, leaving the adapter bolted to the sandwich plate on the engine, removed these two as one: Was then able to flip it over, mark out some holes and drill and tap those. Then the moment of truth, putting it all together... Booyah! that shit is attached. Had to do a bit of fettling but was bugger all. I need to change the blade on my vertical bandsaw so I can trim the excess off the OD of the adapter. Current issue is that its too tight between the flexplate and the converter, they rotate as one without being bolted together. We didn't get exactly 11mm off the plate when we machined it down, it ended up being about 11.2mm which I think is part of where the problem is, it's bringing the trans and engine too close together, in hindsight I probably should have aimed for 10mm. I think to get around this I might skim a bit off the end of the converter so it can sit further inside the bellhousing when seated, but I'm not sure how much clearance the input shaft of the trans should have inside the converter before it bottoms out, surely 1mm less isn't the end of the world? Anyone got any insight?
    18 points
  41. Roll on to 2017 and I got wind of a 1988 e30 Coupe without transmission and a uninstalled motor going for cheap. (This was before the prices of E30s started taking off) I ventured north with @Threeonthetree and found this: It was a facelift 318i 'rust free*' coupe in delphin grey. Povo spec and in pieces. Body looked straight and I saw potential so Dragged it home and parked it up until time allowed for further investigation.
    18 points
  42. I've had this sitting around in my garage for about 18 months while I pissed around trying to get it road legal. I'll run through my experience in case anyone finds it useful. Anyway here it is when I first got it.
    17 points
  43. Did the bellhousing part using the mortar mixer. Gave me atleast a 45min work time on a hot day. Probably 3x as long as the last resin system. Picked up a 6cuft concrete mixer. El Camino for scale. Mixed 70kg for the runner system mould without much issue. Wasnt a perfect mix but I have time to leave it mixing for quite a bit longer. So will try that first.
    17 points
  44. I realise this is pretty high levels of barrying, but these things are so handy for small parts , brackets, suspension parts, etc etc, but they definitely benefit from some tricks to make them work better Share them here 1. Vacuum is a definite must have to suck the dust out and take it outside the environment. My next mod will be a 20l container to help separate the dust before it gets into the vac, as you have to stop and clean the filter regularly 2. I put a water trap on the cabinet, this stops 90% of the water getting blown onto your blasted part . This worked much better at the cabinet end of the air hose 3. The lamp they come with sucks and any lamp you put inside gets munted from the sand quickly so I just got a $20 bunnings led work lamp and put it on the outside of the window 4. Dust sticks to the window pretty quickly so you have to stop and clean it all the time. I started to use meguiars quick detailer spray wax stuff and that stops the shit sticking to the window, I hardly have to clean it any more 5. You need a decent compressor, I got a twin cyl belt drive one that is 190lpm and it keeps up fine
    17 points
  45. The bike now ready I gathered some more docs together, another ownership declaration and the NZTA approval, loaded it on a trailer and towed it to VTNZ. A few days and $525 later ($325 inspection fee + 6 months rego) I got a call saying it was ready to pick up, clean sheet check, nice.
    16 points
  46. Another dozen Steinlager to the man with the aluminium welding skills and another little bit is stuck together.
    16 points
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