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  1. Chopping up the Imp shell took longer than expected. I'm pleasantly surprised at how solid they are for what is just a budget small car. It was also even rustier than expected and I'm glad I was not tempted to try and make something of it. I had to get this shot... ...and this shot. All chopped up... I rescued these bits. I have no idea where I'll stash them. Maybe hang the nose cone from high up on the workshop wall, led lights fitted into the headlamps. I've now got a full spare set of suspension arms too. These could come in handy as bench top jigs if I look into mounting disc brakes on the back etc. We took the remains to the scrap man the following day and he gave us $78 in return. I had paid $200 for the complete Imp so it now owes me only $122. Or I prefer to look back at the pies, cakes and coffee we both had in town after seeing Mr scrappy. Back to the Impy project. I now really only had a bit of wiring to do plus some other little jobs. Wiring first. A bit of work in the 'frunk' to clean up the fuel pump wire routing.. Drained the last of the coolant out while I was there.. glad for the handy drain plug I had added when building the radiator in. Work where the car needed to be on the hoist was over with but before I lowered the car onto its wheels I grabbed these shots which I really like.. Onto its wheels and rolled away for the first time since fitting the flat six. Wow. Pretty neat occasion in itself. Happy to see it still sat at the same height. Looking forward to weighing it in the future and seeing how much lard/muscle/festive season insulation its put on. I was now able to climb in and out of the doors easily and sort out the final wiring. Stuff to be done was running the power and ignition wires to the ecu, water pump wires and some sensor wires forward then make it look all serviceable and neat enough. I had to extend the water pump temp sensor wire so the controller could be mounted in a sensible place. Take note of this last bit as I'll be coming back to it... With the wiring now sorted I could move onto finishing of some other loose ends so to speak. But first I had to start the engine up in the car and check it worked. Which it did after I swapped the two fuel lines in the frunk about so the feed did actually feed the correct line etc - only discovered when I was under the car with a container to clear the lines out of any debris and it came out the other pipe. Whoops. So yeah. The engine just started up with no fuss on first turn of the key. Simples. Sounded great. The was no water in the system so I just ran it for 30 seconds, gave it a rev and let out a little giggle. I then painted the parcel shelf cover thing that I'd made in the last update... While that was drying I made a little lever for the exhaust valves. I started with an old pulley that I'd originally made for my V6 Viva.. Ran a long length of bicycle brake cable through from the engine bay into the interior via the routing that one of the original Imp heater hoses took. Connected the dots with a tandem brake cable inner.. Out with the rivnut tool and put a couple into the inner sill. Lever mounted... Sound levels turned up to 11, small kids scarper, nuns faint and dogs howl in the distance* when lever is turned as such. *Hopefully. Next up was filling the cooling system with water. Not coolant. I've learned from that mistake and I'm sure I'll be having to remedy some sort of issue which might involve emptying it out again. Turned the electric pump controller on and noticed it telling me the water was a balmy 54 degrees. It definitely wasn't. Its winter here (apparently) and the water was 15 degrees according to my volt meter temp probe. That bloody sensor wire! When I lengthened it by about 800mm I used 12/0.15mm gauge wire. The original sensor wires were 17/0.15. I didn't think 5 strands @ 0.15mm were going to make enough difference to change the reading but how I was wrong. So this was where I was working early evening yesterday... I rummaged through my extensive supply of cables, picked out a few that might be ideal and started with some beefier speaker cable that had many more strands. I didn't count them as tiny. I just connected it up and tried it out. Bang on! Both meters read exactly the same. I tidied it all up and we started the engine. Ran it up to temp which took ages because by now it was only about 11 degrees. No leaks and the pump seemed to bleed of air easily. Hannah took a vid of me giving it a cheeky rev. Such fun. You'll see that in the next vid. Interestingly and annoying is that the exhaust valves don't seem to do anything to the engine note at idle. Maybe they will make a difference when asking more of the exhaust? It was by then too late to go out for a hoon. I still had to fit the belts, all of the seats, the nice blue parcel shelf engine hole cover and also the actual engine bay lid. So I spent the evening finishing these tasks off. I'd love to have driven it because it was a clear, albeit cool, day. Lots of heavy rain expected the following few days. Oh well. It was great to see the interior back in. Although the recaros don't match the interior colours I just love seeing them. I like this pic. Old and new. 'West German' seats, old imp interior, sneaky megasquirt and usb cable. So this morning it was finally time for the big occasion. There were so many things to go wrong, not work, be noisy etc. We just popped a tool box in the front, plugged the laptop in and went for a drive... Wow. It works! The clutch pickup point was spot on, gear change seems fine in a mechanical way. The gearbox was quiet. No whines. The engine was completely out of tune and we couldn't really tune it properly on this short drive. We did about 12km but a combination of the very cold morning and a very efficient cooling system meant the engine wouldn't get above about 80 when on the move so for much of the drive it was still on warmup enrichment. I now realise that I should have upped the temp setting on the pump controller. I think the default is 85 degrees so it pretty much had the pump running full time. I want this engine to be running at 95 degrees C. But hey - great to know the cooling system works well at cooling. The exhaust is more than loud enough. There's no insulation above the engine cover so that will refine the interior when cruising and how cool it is to pop into a 5th gear!!! Again, due to lack of tune I couldn't really note what the gearing is like. I never really gave it the full welly because my dash rev counter wasn't working (I have a sneaky suspicion I plugged in the wrong signal wire that currently goes no where) I just drove the car and enjoyed the fact that this moment was finally happening. Hell - it was March 4 years ago that this engine first arrived on a pallet. The things that were not so good.. The clutch bite point got lower and lower until it was tricky to get into gear. Either failing slave or master cylinder. I suspect (and hope) its the MC. Its a bit fumy. Granted it was running pretty rich and the rear cover I've made is not sealed properly. The gear lever knob moves back and forth with the engine/transmission movement. Not annoying and only noticeable if you keep your hand on the knob (chuckle) while accelerating. I had figured it would because its a very slop free mechanical connection. Maybe stiffer engine/box mounts might help but then I could expect to have more noise in the cabin. The weather was a bit shit so we went home, had coffee and cake and I looked over the car. It leaks oil. Typical. It was weeping/dripping from the point between the heads and case sides where the oil drains back into the sump then running back with the airstream and spitting onto the muffler. So there's some of the fumes then. Only happens when the engine is running but its enough to be an issue I want to sort out asap. The leaks are here. This side where it leaks straight onto the cooling pipe and runs back... The other side.. Nothing to leak onto but its still getting flicked back by the airstream onto the muffler... Here's a head gasket. You can spot the drain hole. Its only pinched up at the bottom by one 6mm bolt. If I knew then what I know now I'd have added a thin smear of threebond sealant on each side of the loop to be sure. Oh well. The mess it made on the muffler. So that's where I'm at. We checked the clutch. It works fine on the hoist. Bite point still at halfway?. No obvious leaks or traces of fluid from a leaking slave cylinder. Fluid level was fine. I'll check the m/c tomorrow. We bled the system again just to be sure. Only other thing I could suspect would be a dragging spigot bearing but I cant imagine that being the case. Its a new sealed bearing. As for the oil leaks. I'm going to try removing the lower water pipe in situ and get enough room to apply marine sikaflex 291 or similar. Its under no pressure so hopefully should seal ok so long as I get it super clean beforehand. We will test it all again, leaks or no leaks, when the rain stops (rain warning for our district this weekend) but for now I am simply chillin' and relaxin' and celebrating the first drive in a flat six powered imp that sounds pretty glorious.
    96 points
  2. Picked up the clutch MC seal kit from town while there for the weekly shop. Got home, removed the fuel tank to gain access to the pedal box, removed the cylinder and stripped it. Like I said , its been 5 years since I last had it apart. I'd like to blame this time span for forgetting what the main seal looks like. Or I could just blame my own stupidity for not looking up Imp seal kits before ordering what I thought was the right kit in because what I'd bought doesn't look much like what I needed. Oh well. The seal doesn't look too bad, nor the bore too worn. The seal could have sharper edges for sure but it would just have to do because I wanted to go out for a good drive the following day. I'll sort out replacements for the future. I reassembled it all and Hannah helped me bleed the system, again. Seems ok so we got all the blankets that used to be in the car and covered the rear parcel shelf in a bid to quieten down the engine thrum. This morning dawned a bit chilly with high cloud. Since it was about 6 degrees I used that as a chance to further tune the cold start. Once warmed up I tried sorting out the hot start. It would always start but then die unless I held the throttle open and let it settle to idle. If I didn't hold the revs up it would stumble into in the low revs/high load area on the main fuel map and I thought that was too rich. So I leaned those bins out. Got sick of mucking about and we went for a drive. By the time we got near our morning coffee destination the sun was out and it was lovely! We had a date to meet up with another oldschooler and there he was, waiting with his small rear engined noisy toy by the beach. I took some pics. Its one of the few cars that makes the imp look large... Dylan went for a hoon in my imp and then I in his x19. The various folk about the carpark with their dogs and kids must have had a giggle. We both must have looked clown like emerging from these tiny low cars. I'm 6'2" and Dylan is even taller. It was great to try out a x19 with a proper amount of power and it sounds great. I'm looking forward to when my Imp is properly sorted so we can do some spirited cross country drives. My throttle tip in from idle was a bit sensitive and inclined to bog down making it tricky to get used to. After a good coffee we parted ways and Hannah and I went home. On the motorway (Tasman 'motorway' that is.. there's like 3 areas with decent passing lanes) I was able to see how it was at higher speeds. It cruises along effortlessly at 100kph pulling around 2900rpm. Luckily the 'its getting boring now' exhaust boom is not around that zone. I'm going to have to do some work to the exhaust and try to tune out some of the drone. I have ideas already on how. Before getting home Hannah took some driveby vids. Once home I threw them together and popped them up on the tube. It sounds great. This is the first time I have heard it properly as such. Please do it justice and listen to the vid on a decent sound system because phones won't do the low notes any favours. Once home I had a play with the off idle area of the tune. I started by adding fuel back to the area I'd removed it this morning and this improved it muchly. I tweaked it, tested it, tweaked it until it was now much easier to open the throttle from idle without going lean and lurching. Then the hot start issue. Turns out I just needed to add more seconds to the 'crank to run taper time' in idle control. 5 seconds wasn't enough. Just kept adding time until its started and settled gently down to idle. Those who have tuned their own efi projects will understand just how satisfying this shit is and also how frustrating it can be until you learn what needs to be done. So I ended the days tuning on a little high and decided to tinker no further so left it at that. I put the imp on the hoist, up in the air and checked for leaks. But for a tiny weep from one bolt area there's nothing. In fact, touch wood, this is now the least leaky of all our vehicles!
    60 points
  3. After settling down from all the excitement I had a little break from the car for a day or two while I got some other stuff done. Plus it was raining cats and frogs outside. We ended up getting 160mm (6.2" for those imperial folk) of rain in two days. I made a rough plan on what I'd do next to iron out some of the issues. The leaks and clutch were the most urgent. We bled the clutch again. It seemed fine in use on the hoist with Hannah in the car working the pedal in and out while I turned the rear wheels. Bite point still roughly in the middle of travel. But I'm still going to look at the master cylinder because from a peek under the dash it doesn't look that flash... It has been playing up (bite point getting low) with the Datsun engine and it's not been touched in the 5 years since first getting this imp on the road. There's a seal kit waiting for me in town and I'll see how good it comes up. The leaks next. I had a suspicion that the little vent hole in the filler tube was letting oil squirt out as the oil splashed up the tube. I wanted to work out where the majority of oil was coming from before taking the next steps. Plus I wanted to drive the car some more before mucking about taking things apart. So I folded up this oil shield with a folded edge that hopefully catches the oil... 'The oil shield 2000' bolted up below the cam belt cover... Now I can go for another hoon. But I need to easily spot my revs (because until tuned I'm not going to blindly go bouncing it off the limiter). My rev counter wasn't working off the signal from the coil pack. I'm not sure what kind of signal that puts out or if indeed its working properly at all. So I swapped the signal wire over to the one from the megasquirt. Still nothing though. The rev counter, being an old cheap thing ($7 from the swap meet) needs a high voltage spike like it gets from the negative terminal of the ignition coil. Enter stage left a spare relay. I took it apart, removed switch plate leaving just a little coil... Made this little harness.. Ignition voltage flows through the relay coil to the ecu tach signal wire. The rev counter tach signal wire is connected to the ecu side of the coil. Each time the current is switched off by the ecu it creates a voltage spike to the old rev counter so emulating an old ignition setup. This was a fun little job made nicer by having 'driven' the imp out into the sunshine. The ground had already dried nicely after the rainy weekend, the sun was hot and it was nice to be working in natural light. Fitted the little 'Ignition spike generator 2000' in place and now I have a working rev counter... I'd also folded up a bit of alloy, stuck some double sided tape on and remounted the water pump controller angled upwards so I could read the bloody thing ^ Note how generally untidy that lot is. I really want to remove the lot, put it in a bin and rebuild my own dash and instruments. That is future Alex's job though. Time for a second drive. Boy its quick! I let it get up to about as hot as it could and did a spot of auto tuning. The tune was improving all the time as I tried to drive in as many areas on the fuel map as I could. I still didn't want to drive for too long because I was aware that the oil leaks were no doubt covering the whole back of the car with a fine mist of muck but I gave the throttle a bit more jandal (actually bare foot) and took it up to 5k. A mix of genuine surprise, shock from going that quick in the imp and mechanical sympathy held me back from going any higher. Its wicked! It really snarls. Very much looking forward to getting better footage including some drive by clips so I can give a you all a better idea. Its much quicker than I was expecting from what should be a stock 100bhp (but could well be less or maybe a little more) and I figure its the 115lbft torque that's making it feel so punchy and fun. Once back home and into the workshop it was up into the air to see where the oil splatter was at its worst. Sure enough most of it was around the filler cap area. That vent hole. Luckily its very easy to undo one screw and remove the filler neck. See the little hole here, above the screw hole... I filled it in with some quiksteel epoxy putty and refitted it with a smear of sealant around the joint and screw head just to be sure. I also made this. Its a cablestay 2000. It stops the O2 cable from going for a sneaky wander across the top of the oil filter pedestal and straying too close to the exhaust headers... One other issue I have been thinking about (too much) is the coolant system not getting hot enough. From extensive sofa residing google searches there's a few Davies Craig pump/controller combo owners in colder climates who can't get their cars up to temp, or at least not very quickly. Interestingly it was often Triumph car owners. Stags and Dolomites etc. The controller chip runs the pump through 3 main settings. At warm up runs the pump for 10secs on, 30 off until it reaches 20 degrees below the user defined target temp. Then it goes to 10 on, 10 off. At 5 degrees before target temp it has a lineal ramp up to pump on full time. Ideally it should be able to pump slower or for less time when its cold outside because on these colder days (circa 10-15 degrees) takes quite a long time to get up to even 80 degrees if the target temp is say 90-95. I was getting a bit too thinky about all this, doing lots of frantic googling and getting ready to type a strongly worded email to Davies Craig. I was also prepping to build a thermostat housing, just as some had on various threads I'd read. I even bought some alloy. I wasn't keen on this happening though. Adding restriction is one of the main reasons for premature pump failure (according to other threads..) plus it was going to be adding more ugly things to go wrong. But common sense prevailed... Goldwing engines seem to sit at around 87-90 degrees when cruising right and while they can happily handle more heat I have no need to chase it. Its pretty cold here. About as cold as I'd normally expect to see when I might be out in the car. Summer is bloody hot. Be happy it stays cool easily. Finally.. up the target temp a few degrees higher so the controller sits in the lowest flow rate possible. Rest easy me. So we went for another drive this evening. A good strop. Up some hills. Did more tuning. Tried to see as much of the fuel map as we could and let the program do its thing. It was getting better all the time although the fuelling will only end up as efficient as what I have set as targets. If I have that wrong then it'll always be wrong. Lots of driving to do so I can tune areas more by the seat of my pants and what feels right. But it was already much better and I was getting more confident and it was fun. Not so much for Hannah who was trying to hold onto the door and the laptop at the same time though. Clutch seems to be holding ok and the bite point seems ok but I'm still replacing that seal. At one point we heard a sound and saw something bouncing on the road in the cars wake. I stopped and checked the engine bay. Nothing amiss. Then I looked at the oil level (that little light under the cap never gets boring..) and the level was down. Hmmm. No signs of oil mess on the rear though. Maybe its just the oil level when the car is idling and hot... We drive up the road again and spot that the thing I must have clipped with my wheels was a bit of roadside marker. Go home now. Play is over. Its getting dark. Onto the hoist... No signs of mess at all on the back like the last two drives. Have a look under the car.. Clean as. The slightest hint of oil on one rear sump bolt. But no drips. Result !!! It must have been that vent hole. The low oil level? I checked it with the car on the ground again hoping it had risen as the oil drained back but no. Then I released the cap and the oil level in the filler tube rose. Ha. It's that well sealed. But really it needs a vent so there's no pressure changes. I'll have to look into it because I don't want oil pissing either. Going to be tricky with such a low cap. Other things I have done is go on more romantic dates with Hannah to the wreckers where we looked for bits. I got these to try out for the basis of my custom instruments. If I can get the speedo head working fine with my Toyota speed sensor then I'll strip it further.
    57 points
  4. Made a water pipe. Factory one is mild steel. And 40 years old so it's pretty fucked. Bought some 16mm bends and a T and made a new one. I think I'll stick another bracket on it then it's done. I have no idea what the water circuit is going to look like with the ITBs and whatnot but I'll figure that out as I go.
    50 points
  5. Standard exhaust manifolds and some coby hotdogs on it because I just wanted to see if it fired up okay. But... shit yes
    44 points
  6. So when the mk3 Zephyr v8 project fizzled, the hunt was on for a rat rod body. She works at a V8 shop so we tend to hang out with older gents and the lively ones have rats & traditional hot rods that mostly cruise around the shows or let rip at private paddock racing and dirt track events which is our speed too! Half of the affordable bodies and projects on the market were rubbish on ute chassis, 4drs or British. My one stipulation was that it had to be of American lineage.. a real hot rod! Then this came up on TM, dollar reserve or something silly. The owner used to have Moorehouse Muscle Cars so he knew what’s up, but had decided to liquidate and concentrate on a couple of cars. The fact is was complete, going and local was huge for us, and for me.. Flathead Ford! I went and had a look one lunchtime and it had a good vibe. It was built by all the well known rodders in the area in 2006 for the upcoming Muscle Car Madness show but sat for the last 10+ years. The bidding got a bit furious and double what it had been sitting at for a week, but she got it for 12.5! The bloke said when building it, they stopped counting at $25k! Plates are dead but we got the ownership papers from the 70s! - cab stretched 6in so fatties can fit in - engine from 37 Tudor, 24 stud - rad and grille from 37 pickup - V8 3 speed and diff - leather re-used from 39 ford seat - trued ‘35 wire wheels (went through 30 odd rims to make a perfect set!) - 39 Ford front end, 30 Model A chassis - hydraulic brakes - 12ft aerial with flags - exhausts & RR shocks off a Harley - lots of funky old accessories, gauges work and good oil pressure. It fires right up with a tiny amount of choke (a push- pull from an aeroplane) and rumbles away like a fucking champ. It’s like driving a farm implement, way back to basics! The steering box had so much slop it was using both lanes so that got replaced! Means we had to run a different steering wheel, it’s off an old speedboat. It had no brakes when we got it. I tried to save it ( new master cyl) but it wouldn’t pump up. Its mounted below the cylinders so I had to make a sealed raised bleeder thing. Didn’t work, pulled it apart and found it hadn’t aged well just sitting. Got another and started getting somewhere but still fuck all pedal. They don’t have an oil filter so I got some flash Penrith shelley mineral oil made just for these old donkeys. once I finally got the huge 2in hex sump bung off, felt about an inch of sludge in the sump! Couldn’t put my flash oil on top of that so off came the sump. These things are simple as, but there bloody awkward and tight to work on. Foul words were said. Sump gaskets were almost fossilised but there was a swapmeet that weekend and managed to find a gasket and seal set! All back together and it was time for its first outing, Rust n Dust! We’ve been for a few years but never drove the track. A-framed out behind the XD, we had a fucking ball! Did everything it should, no damage and drove up the driveway afterwards. The brake pedal came right after some use too! Has been in Petrolhead and NZ Hotrod mags June/july! The community are great and always willing to help. The grille proportions are off and we picked up a factory grille shell but it’s tiny so we’d have to do a new radiator. I’ll trim are re-position the grill shell with the smaller radiator so we can chop and change styles. She wants it lower, which isn’t as easy as cutting springs.. but its really handy not having to be careful, plus Irishman’s rally requires some clearance.. pipe dream but would be a fun trip. The exhausts are a bit wack so some headers will make their way on when we find some Its Running 12v coil and bulbs but 6v generator so doesn’t charge..might pick up a later 12v setup one day but probably not.. dont drive at night!
    43 points
  7. Picked these boys up today, 185/55-14 Kumho. Turns out there are very few options in this size... They are pretty much exactly the same weight as the CD58's. Now it turns out that the hub is a bit thicker on these so the bolts won't work, there is only a few mm of engagement. Stink. Now if I was the sort of boy who were to research the fitment of these rims relentlessly and thoroughly I would have realised this early on and come to the party prepared.... Which I am and so I did. These arrived from Midwest Bayless a week or so ago. I also drew up and printed some centercaps with the 'Fiat' logo with a nod to @h4nd's ever useful input into things. So then I simply bolted the boys on, although as per my research I removed the front factory 5mm spacer. The previous tyres were a bit bigger at 175-70/13 so must have clearanced things a bit cos there is very little rubbing. I may need to heat the inner guard a bit and push it in but Ill wait til the rubbing shows up well. Anyway, that shit looks fucking goooood. And it feels much tighter on the road, so a complete win.
    39 points
  8. The car is still sitting outside while I've needed the garage space for other stuff. So I've not made any further progress on pulling the engine back apart. However, seeing how well the metal 3d printing went, how expensive it wasnt, and how strong the parts are. I've decided it's time to make some ITB adapters that are a little less delicate than printed nylon. Printing manifolds from nylon is awesome, and I'm amazed this is a possibility to get usable parts this way. However it takes a lot of care. It feels like I'm one poorly timed fart away from over tightening a bolt and stripping threads. Since everything can be super thin if it's printed from metal, I've started my model again from scratch. About 3 billion hours later: This version now has balance tubes between the throttles. As eventually I will need to connect up PCV / brake booster and maybe an IACV if needed. Also improves behavior at part throttle a bit. I've tried to make the tubes structural-ish to help support the top flange. Then the underside of the flanges have as much material scooped out as I think I can get away with. Then same goes for the main flanges. I have added some cross bracing that I hope will add a little strength, and a raised perimeter. I'm really just guessing on what will add strength, as I dont have any of the stress analysis tools available. I could get these with the paid version of F360, but there's no point spending $200 a month (or whatever) on software that is going to save me $30 on a one off print. ha. I'm tempted to just pull the trigger and get these orders underway. However I know I should really print some plastic ones from PLA just to test fit everything and be 100% sure. So will make a start on that tomorrow and maybe a bit of progress on getting the motor apart.
    38 points
  9. Alright so my welding is definitely improving, but, still sucks a bit. I've blurred this image so you can get the gist of what's going on, without causing too many eye bleeds to people who can weld good. My tig skills have been slowly improving a bit throughout the process so far. I've also learned some better techniques for making a manifold. So here are some lessons for next time. Wrong flange material I had the flanges cut out of mild steel, no idea why, think I was just trying to save money vs stainless. I should have just made them stainless as they are already rusty. Maybe because I left them outside for a few months? who can say. Tig torch angle is crucial The big "aha" moment that I reached part way through this, was just how well it pulls the weld pool along when your torch angle is just right. And, recognizing the symptoms of if it's too steep or shallow. A lot of my welds previously had to run really hot because it was hard to try get the pool to move. So end up with big brown heat bands around the weld. Where on a few where I've been able to keep the torch moving fast, ends up with the nice rainbow sort of finish from a much smaller heat affected zone. Cool. I've had a few blowouts which has been annoying, but they are decreasing in frequency with practice, and there are a few welds there that I'm happy with how they look. If someone reading this hasnt tried tig welding before, basically getting the tig torch on the right angle is like when you get "scissor glide" through paper by having the blades in just the right place. Aahhhh. Satisfying. haha. Slot the pipes right through the flange On the flange, I had some holes cut that are the shape of the port, rather than shape of the pipe. So the pipe has to sit on the top face of the flange, it's only held on by a fillet weld around the outside. So this makes positioning the pipe tricky, and it's probably more likely to break off or crack later on. It means that the tack weld has to be fairly grunty to hold it in place, as there's a lot of weight hanging from it. It would be super easy if the pipes just slotted into the flange instead. So this way if It's all tacked together and I just need to extend or shorten the runner by a smidge, I can move the pipe in or out of the flange. Only small tacks are needed as it's supporting much less. Then once it's all welded together, you can just cut the excess pipe lengths off at the back. Might save me needing to do some tricky welds on the front face of the flange as well, if it's hard to reach. As I can just fully weld the pipe from the back side of the flange. Collector doesnt allow for welds between pipes For the collector, I've had fairly tight clearances for the 3 pipes to go together parallel. This has become a pain because there's no allowance for the thickness of a weld where the pipes touch each other. So the pipes want to splay out unless you grind the inside welds flush. It would make life waaayyyyy easier if I put something like an extra 10mm or 15mm on the outside part that the three pipes slot into. This will add some strength but also make it a lot easier to hold the pipes straight when trying to reposition them. U bends for easy length adjustment For getting pipes equal(ish) length it's awesome having a 180 degree bend in the runner - Because if you need to add 300mm, you can just cut 2x 150mm extensions and add them to either side of the 180. So far my first two pipes look to be within 20-30mm of each other with a goal of 860mm total length. (for the arbitrary reason of, the first one was 860mm) Hard part first Making the first pipe fit was the biggest headache, because once it was in place and cleared the crossmember and steering column. It was easy to put the others into the available space. It was good to start on the most difficult side, As this sets what the overall runner length can be, under the most difficult circumstances. So its al lot easier to try match it up on the other side that has more room, than come up with a length that is a nightmare to fit. Hopefully I'll have this side all finished this week. I only ordered 1 collector, so I'll add some revisions before sending off for the 2nd one to be made. I'm going to order a crapload more bends, as I might actually run out before finishing the 3rd runner. Despite thinking I'd have plenty.
    38 points
  10. Fair bit of water under the bridge since I was last here with a project - I think 2008 with my ill-fated Sapporo. No need for too many details, but after a decade of studying and then building a career, I finally am in a position to have a project again. Picked this old gal up today - a touch of rust about but nothing terminal. A mild resto-mod is on the cards, replace all the flogged stuff, give it a slight lift, some mildy chunky tyres, keep it simple and pootle about the place towing my similarly aged boat. Retro feel, none of this punishing business you see on the mall crawlers everywhere these days. Inspired by what the Land Rover guys get up to - something that will age well and suit my advanced years. Has the 2.6 Astron with a 32/36, 5 speed and goes pretty well - torquey and stinky. No plan to do anything to the engine aside from tidy it up, perhaps a non-rusty exhaust and service it well. I drive a Gen 4 Paj (silver one in the pic below) as my daily so I am a real tragic... I also own a 1940s ex-bach that needs even more love than this piece, so progress will be glacial I imagine. Pretty much forgotten everything about old cars so no doubt this will be next seen aflame floating off the Hibiscus Coast (where I now call home). If someone wants to make a discussion thread, feel free but I won't be offended if not. Parked up in its new home - the place where projects come to stall Chur boes
    35 points
  11. A kindof boring and wordy update now You may have seen the discussion thread for this where I noted that the car had developed a light rattle/cyclical vibration somewhere in the engine. This was disappointing but not surprising, in reality I should have stripped it right down to check shit when it was out. But at the same time it had only done 6000kms or so since I sold it, and it basically had a new engine, and it looked ok when I pulled a few things. The noise was weird as it had a cyclical quality every couple of seconds, like something with a wee bit of weight was being slowly rotated while undergoing vibration. I couldn't think what that could be in the engine, and otherwise it sounded like a roller bearing gone bad. @GregT suggested excessive camshaft endfloat, I checked that and the most I could see was 0.3mm, so probably not that. So then I loosened the cambelt to check the tension bearing, that felt ok. Then I took off the v belt and checked the water pump and alternator, they also felt ok. But as I was reinstalling that I noticed some fuckery with the long lower alternator bolt, it looked like the head wasn't sat in its little recess. When I looked I saw that there was no nut at all on the bolt. So I found a suitable locknut and put it back together. Tonight I took it for a quick run to check things and the noise appears to be gone. I will check again but I am hoping it is as simple as that... Also as discussed elsewhere @yoeddynz and I did a little drive swapping the other day, I was super pleased to be able to have a go in the Imp, it was a good time and I felt a certain privilege. It goes very well considering its early state of tune/refinement. Here is the only pic I took of it laying rubber into the distance; Alex pointed out that my throttle feel was not all it could be (TBH I thought he liked it stiff and hard), so a few days later I rejigged the mechanism at the throttle to make it seat at idle a bit better. This meant I could remove the hacked in extra spring that was making things stiffer. Then I reduced the amazing amount of slop in the pedal linkage itself, so that all feels a lot nicer now.... I didnt take any pics of any of this so I leave you with it looking rather fetching in its shiny new boots...
    34 points
  12. Didn't need it, but too cheap & enough of it left, to leave it where it was. Dead reg NZ new 1955 Chevrolet, 6 cylinder manual. Probably equates to a 210 model offshore. The last rego label reads 1979, was a donor for a 57 being put back on the road since the 90s. The door cards, rear plate, air cleaner and gearbox are in the boot. The floors are poked, as are some corners, sills and roof. Nothing horrendous. Under all the shite there are GM rubber floor mats which will have accelerated the rot. My brother reckons he has a freshly rebuilt Blueflame 6 he inherited from a job years ago so thats what shall power it. Plan is to just source all the missing parts and make the exterior look complete, make it start and stop. In the meantime it’s garden art! Have scored tail light surrounds, front and rear badges and surrounds, some interior trim and a front flasher we weren’t missing but the guy didn’t want. Ive got a few things on, so while it’s hard.. I’m trying to keep it at arms length. Some cool rubbish found so far:
    34 points
  13. A few more Cortinas in between, and fast forward to beginning of May this year. Trawling through FB marketplace, I spotted this car. It was built in late 1980's, same time I built mine, and current owner was selling it less engine. It was running a 393 Cleveland with around 600hp, with a 150 shot of Nitrous. He had run a best of 9.0 @ 150 mph, not bad for an old Cortina! I went to Papamoa straight away to view the car, paid a deposit, and collected it on Saturday last week. I haven't decided exactly what I am going to do with it yet. It was deregistered when it was turned into a drag car, so I am going to investigate making it road legal again. Would be fun to drive to car shows, or nip down to the dairy for milk! If that proves too difficult, then it will stay as a drag car only. Either way, I would like to go drag racing, so focus will still be on keeping it primarily as a drag car. Engine is TBC, although most likely a V8. It is very well built, and has some good parts fitted, half chassis rear, big tubs, very short fabricated nine inch with Strange 35 spline shafts, brakes and double adjustable shocks. Weld wheels 15"x12" rear and 15"x4" front. Front suspension is Ford Escort Gp.4 style struts, with Escort rack, rear end is ladder bar. A few pics of the car racing, and prior to engine removal, and then on the trailer after arriving home on Saturday.
    34 points
  14. 3d print all of the things! Fuel rails, at the best of times, are about as interesting looking as soviet era apartment blocks. If you're lucky theyre tucked away down low somewhere mostly out of sight. However mine are right in your face up top and currently they're pretty ugly. Despite me using the smallest fuel rail extrusion I could find, they ended up huge and surprisingly heavy. Not the end of the world to have ugly fuel rails, and hardly a top priority to remedy the issue. However its the first thing you see in the engine bay. So it mildly annoys me that they suck. Back to the drawing board for a new version. I wanted to tuck these in a bit closer to the throttles and have a bit more of an organic shape. Fingers crossed they work out good! Hopefully this stuff turns up in a week or two, and I can sit it all on top of my broken engine.
    33 points
  15. All other project have ceased due to lots of distractions. Distraction number 1 has been the cnc plasma, which is an excellent distraction. However distraction number 2 has been my digger requiring one hell of a birthday. It was my old man's, I inherited when he died a few years ago. It had been running hot forever and his solution was to add an electric fan, which is kindof great as we got many hundreds more hours of work out of it. Anyway, inevitable happens and it finally released the smoke, so I found a Kubota ride on with the same little d722 3 cylinder diesel in it, @ThePog kindly collected from somewhere local to him, only 1200 hours on it which was perfect. The old motor was so farked. Cracked head, piston slap, run bearings etc. It actually still ran, surprisingly. So out with the old, in with the new Have then spent last 4 evenings and the weekend prepping and painting. Will blow a fresh coat on this week. The factory paint job was obviously shit as it was flaking and surface rusting very randomly. I'm hopinh it will come up a treat.
    32 points
  16. When in context with modern cars you realise that this thing is absolutely tiny. I was 6'3' the last time I checked, it must look like a fucking clown show when I get in or out.
    32 points
  17. Around 11 pm everything was back together and a short test run proved that all systems were go. BED TIME... Early the next morning everything was loaded up and with Alan Jackson on the radio I set off to meet the boys for our 5 day trip around Sweden. Everything was great on the first day, turbos were boosting, beers were drunk and all in all a good time was had. At some point We had bought some Drag Radials from a dude around Stockholm, I got ZEB to pick them up for me, and I had mentioned that if everything was going well then we could come and get them, so we woke up early and hit the road for the 5 hr each way road trip. all in all it was going well, I had the laptop hooked up datalogging and all was good, we stopped for some diesel and I let my buddy drive, the pull onto the highway from the gas station proved too much for the heater core, which promptly exploded and dumped water into the cabin and vents. We stopped, by passed that and fixed a diesel leak while we were at it, and continued on our way. With me on the laptop and old mate driving we made headway on the tune, with each page up producing school girl giggles and soon enough the 3 bar map sensor was showing 3080 mBar and the egt was 950 degrees in the datalog. All was good, until around half an our out of our destination when the dreaded manifold tick reared it ugly head, not entirely unexpected as I hadn't had time to surface the manifold after welding but it turns out I had a lot to learn about turbo manifold afixing. Anyway, we limped back to base camp and pulled the turbos to try and fix the leak. It ultimately turned out unsuccessful, but we tried, we limped the rest of the trip and at some point the lift pump relay gave up the ghost, so with that bypassed and many more beers drunk we made it home. With only 2 weeks until street week pressure is on, but it seems as if things are do-able...
    32 points
  18. Epotec 408 epoxy. 2-3 coats. I did most of it with a brush. Took fucking ages, over 4 days. Near the end I remembered I had some small fluffy rollers and discovered they were much faster and also got in little divots that the brush just skipped over.
    32 points
  19. Well today was a big day.. slab is done! Mate started at sun up prepping for the arrival of concrete like setting up the rebates and conduit locations while concrete pump guys were there doing hose things. Ordered 20m3 and it used all of that with only what was left in the hoses as leftover. After 3.5 hours of pour and laying, mate and his son spent the following 5-6 hours doing concrete magic to the slab.
    30 points
  20. First Rally completed, some what successfully as well
    30 points
  21. Been filling the doors and the rear of the quarter, I hate it! Time for something else. Kirsty has spent a bit of money on parts and they are on their way, so time to prep for that. First things first, lows! Picked up some rear lowering springs the other day for cheap, used but pretty much brand new, old mate couldnt get his wagon out the driveway with them, been forward and backward about 30m. They are a fair bit shorter than the existing ones but a fair bit stiffer too Dropped the rear about 40mm from where it was, and still on the jacks. Its low-er but not low, much less saggy tho. now can move to the front end to eventually get it to match. Busting this apart has been easier than it looks but not easy. Haul so far Brake pad use has been maximised! Shocked but not surprised face!
    30 points
  22. Getting that bracing out of the way meant I could get back onto the list of pre-quarter welding jobs. As a refresher, this is what I mean: - Pinch weld seam repairs IN PROGRESS - Repair Cert IN PROGRESS - Properly paint inaccessible areas NOT YET STARTED Getting the last little bit before the repair cert done was a doddle. Because I used a home-made spot weld drill to unpick the majority of the seam welds along the quarter panel, the resultant holes were a bit scruffy, and the second layer had been a bit munched in a few cases. To sort that, I opted to replace the outer edge of most of the affected panels. It's not a flawless metal-finished result, but it's well within a coat of high-build primer. In some cases it was easier to outright fabricate and install a replacement panel: With that though, all the pinch-weld seam repairs were complete. Nothing stopping me now but a close-out inspection by Rod, my repair certifier. I flicked off an email to organise a visit, and no sooner had I done that, that I thought "maybe it's worth just sorting out that little bit of rot in the windscreen post before he turns up." I figure given how cramped my workspace is, it's in Rod's interest to come and look at the car as few times as possible. I relayed this through to him and he encouraged me to sort that out first and get him around afterwards. So windscreen post rot then. This is the rust in question: Given the structural demands placed on this panel, and the inaccessibility to paint the inside of any repairs, I decided early on that I want to replace the whole thing à la the original factory design. That means cutting down into the previously replaced A pillar panel, as well as the cowl patch I put in way back in 2017. This is not actually the end of the world. I was very (let's say) naïve back then, so the A panel repairs (and indeed all the fabrication work) were pretty rip shit and bust and have been playing on my mind for a while. They could all do with ripping out and re-doing if I'm being honest. So let's embrace the scope creep again. First step was to cut out all the offending panels: I used a spot weld drill again where appropriate and a slitting disk as required. It was quite validating taking the A panel off seeing three or four plug welds had not penetrated at all. I was right to redo this work if even just for that. Next step was to start fabricating the replacement panels. First up, the inner A panel: This came from a paper pattern off the old panel and extensive use of various hammers, dollies, and a cheap bead roller I picked up a while ago. Next was the windscreen post itself along with a small internal brace. These were produced in the same fashion as above; paper pattern, cut out a steel blank, then a tipping wheel and various hammers and dollies. I also was recently gifted some clecos by a very generous workmate. Can you tell? On the home stretch now. Last big panel to cover is the outer A post. Same deal again: Paper-steel-tipping wheel-hammers-swearing-hammers-etc. This one was bloody tricky I don't mind saying. The big shrink on the top left corner took a lot of beating and perseverance to get to come round. Got there in the end though. I threw the door and guard back on to make sure I had the lines close enough to correct. Pretty close. There is a section that I assume is part of the factory roof panel that overlaps the top of the windscreen post and is leaded from factory. I made a small section to replace it that I'll weld on near the end. The windscreen post panel and outer A post were (as far as I can tell at least) all part of a single piece that included part or all of the sill from factory. I intend to emulate that as best as possible which means joining my new A panel to the previously built windscreen post panel. Pro-tip: an orbital sander makes any weld look excellent and makes you look like a great panel beater if you lack actual talent. I've also made the doubler panel that goes on the inside of the A panel and mounts the door hinges out of 2mm sheet but I didn't get around to taking any photos. Rest assured, it's there. The final panel I'll need to close this section out is a patch panel for the cowl. Given the slightly medieval methods I resorted to to remove the old one, it's harder to make a paper pattern off the existing panel. The existing one was already a hand made patch as well (see my posts from 2017 on page 2), so it's hard to trust it in the first place. Knowing that, I opted for a wire form buck in this case as a starting point. It's made to match the profile of the back of the bonnet, guard, and door skin. I took the shape of the dished section from a series of flipped profiles from the driver's side, granted with some eyeball smoothing involved. Using the form, I was able to start with the paper pattern and continue in the normal fashion. I was actually pretty shagged at this point so I left the roughing in to the sprog this time. After a day of fine tuning and planishing, I got it looking pretty close. You can see how much I've been struggling with flash rust in this damp wee garage in that last photo. Well that and how long it took me to make all these panels. I keep meaning to spray over stuff with some Zinc-it but I never get around to pulling the panels off the car and getting the wire brush in there to sort it out. I'll get there before it turns into an actual hole. A closing thought here: If you have the means, I definitely don't recommend doing it all this way. The replacement panels for these sections would be a few hundred dollars shipped from Palmside. When you tally up all my hours to hand make them, and translate that to an equivalent hourly rate, it makes absolutely no sense to do it the way I did. I would have been better off doing a few hours of overtime and welding them all on over a weekend. However, I spent essentially $0 (if you excuse the material cost of the steel which I had already) which keeps the bookkeeper happy, and now have the job satisfaction of knowing I made every panel in this assembly. That can't be worth nothing. With that cowl panel done (or near enough. I'll do the final trimming and fitting once the structural panels are back on) I'm finally read for Rod to come and do his inspections. It's a very exciting feeling knowing I could be just a few licks of paint away from getting this side of the car totally ready for close out. Then I just have to do it all again on the other side. Thanks for reading.
    28 points
  23. Since the last post I’ve been waiting patiently for my builder to make a start. I felt good about teeing it up with him as he built my last shed about 8 years ago when I lived in TK. Mid March was when my consent was approved, was told he could start in two weeks. Cool.. that 2 weeks felt so much more like 2.5 months.. so weird. Anyway, after unanswered calls and a couple texts, I decided to sort it out myself.. these things happen for a reason. Got a couple quotes, then decided to call a mate of mine from school I hadn’t spoken to for a number of years, just to see if he was still in the concrete business.. yep he is and yep he’s more than happy to make it happen for me. I started by getting all the steel and polythene thru work. Mate made a start last week, setting out the back board and partial side board for the Drainlayer & Plumber to come along and do their thing. Clay is good for water retention when it pisses down with rain. Inspection done and a little fine tuning of the shower waste, all back filled. Mate back at it today, all boxing done and perimeter footing started.. happy days.
    28 points
  24. Was allowed an hour or 2 in the shop today, so I did some things. tacked in the rear rear tubs, great, now I need to do more sanding and filling on the sides of the tray. and dropped the motor and box back in. went to drop the rad in and was wondering why it didn’t line up. Don’t have the body mount rubbers in there, oh well, tomorrow’s job.
    28 points
  25. More progress.. trenches all dug out, polythene and steel laid with a thicker area for the hoist. Inspection passed and now ready for concrete. Inspector commented on the over engineered foundation.. I might of designed it a bit bigger than it needed to be, oh well. Hopefully we’ll have a slab down just before the long weekend.
    25 points
  26. so i realised i haven't updated this in awhile, i thought i had Updated this build thread but its been deleted? weird anyway, j160 bellhousing adaptor and Engine/Trans mounts from Brendan at Niteparts turns out 2zz are much harder to find than you would expect took afew months but this turned up this week. Started giving it a good clean and found some mystery RTV while giving it a scrub down which is scary but hopefully its just a leaky front cover/tensioner. Started chipping away at afew rust spots, I've never really done rust work before but limited tools and only a tig make it harder than it should be, good enough for a race car. also someone had decided the C Piller vents weren't cool so deleted them, so i deleted the delete so i not have piller vents again In between all of this i finally got the rollcaged all ticked off and homologated so i could get on with painting the interior so i don't have to be worried about stuff rusting, Water blasted the underside while it was semi warm today to get it ready for underseal to pretty it up.
    24 points
  27. I'm still slowly ticking off jobs on the whiteboard, and although this wasn't a "pre-wof" job, I wanted to get it done before a couple of other jobs in the queue that were. Back in Feb I reinstalled the refurbished and tested heater box, but I never actually connected the heater core to anything, presuming that I would do it later. I'll tell you now, I wish I had at least fit a pair of 90 degree hoses off the heater core when it was out and easy to access, instead of doing it in the car. The plan here to was get the heater connected and working, before installing the carpet into the car, just in case it did decide to spring a leak, it won't damage the carpet. A while ago I ordered 1 meter of 51mm flexible ducting from Aliexpress to run from the outlets on the bottom of the heater box and up to the windscreen vents, this will allow me to direct air to the windscreen to demist it. This fits inside the plastic 90 degree joints on the bottom of the heater box, and on the outside of the dash vents, as per factory. I installed the vents into the dash first. These were a real pain in the backside to get into place, and work out which one went on which side. I got there in the end, and then cut some ducting and slipped it into place, using duct tape to seal and secure it. The driver's side is a bit less fun as there is less space to work and more wires in the way Unfortunately, after all the faffing about getting the dash vent in place, for whatever reason, it turns out the vent doesn't clear the speedo on the three-dial cluster and no amount of forcing it was going to allow them to share the limited space available. I don't know if this is because the car originally had two dials and the vent is different, or if I was doing something wrong, but in the end, I removed the dash vent, and zip-tied the duct to the dash structure. This still blows out through the slot in the dash, it's just not as directed as it should be. It's better than nothing. Speaking of the dash cluster, once I refitted it, and the steering wheel (since I removed it to give me more space to work under the dash), I refitted the steering wheel center pad for the first time since I got the car. This wheel is only until the car is on the road and then I have a nice aftermarket one to fit, but it's a milestone nonetheless. Who doesn't love a good plughole of despair? Testing the vents with the functional two-speed blower showed ample air being blown in the general direction of the windscreen. The next step was to actually hook up the heater core to the cooling circuit. This required me to obtain a couple (2-3) meters of 1/2" heater hose, and a pair of "Z" hoses (universal hoses that have a 90 and a 45 degree bend with a couple of straights, for cutting to fit). I also obtained a brass joiner, and brass "ball" valve. The Z hoses are to give me a pair of 90 degree fittings out of the heater core. I'm not running the standard heater valve that mounts to the box and is controlled with the cable, as I don't have a good one, and replacements are expensive. I don't care much for needing to change the temp often, so I chose to regulate the temperature with a ball valve in the hose instead. Winter mode, and summer mode. Because I'm not running the standard heater valve, I needed the hoses to clear the brackets immediately in front of the heater core outlets and then exit through the hole in the firewall. A normal hose would kink when trying to bend that sharp, so it had to be a 90 degree moulded bend. The upper heater core pipe is above the one visible, completely blocked by the bracket Z hoses are perfect for this sort of thing. I found these Aeroflow silicone ones locally at a reasonable price I cut the 45 off and shortened the 90 so it would fit I then proceeded to fight with the hose for the next half hour or so, trying to get it fully onto the upper pipe. The space is limited, and the visibility is zero, so it was all done by feel, and I sure felt the sharp bits digging into me. I was very close to just giving up on fitting the heater, it was fighting me that hard, but eventually, with both hands up under the dash, my head on the trans tunnel and my legs hanging out of the car, it finally slipped into place. The next fight was the hose clamp, getting that into place and tightening it, but we won't go into that. The lower hose was much easier to fit, it more or less pressed into place and the clamp went on without much fuss. Now that I had both stubs of hose poking through the firewall, I sprayed some silicone spray on the rubber grommet and pressed it onto the hoses and into the firewall. I had previously looped the heater hoses at the engine, as the previous owners had too (albeit their loop was a lot longer and had a joiner in the middle of it) A bit of research showed that the top heater hose was the one that went to the standard heater valve, so that's the one I fit the tap into I had also seen in photos that the hoses are usually secured to the inner wing by a pair of P clamps. I located a hole that would've been where a self-tapper went into I hate using coarse threaded screws to secure things, so drilled it out a bit further After coating it with some Rover Zircon Blue paint, I whacked an M5 Rivnut into it This allowed me to use a pair of P clamps to secure the hoses in place, keeping them tucked up nicely I then quickly juggled the old loop hose, spilled some coolant, and connected the two heater hoses It's quite a nice tidy setup, and I'm quite proud of how well it has worked out. When the red lever on the valve is in line with the hose, the coolant is flowing in that direction, turn it 90 degrees and it's closed. While I was there, spilling coolant on the floor, I also removed and swapped the coolant temp sender. I had never seen the coolant temp gauge rise, even when the coolant was warm enough to cycle the fan, so I wanted to see if replacing the sender helped. I believe the old one was original and is marked Smiths. The terminal was wiggly, which I'm not sure if it's meant to be The replacement went straight in without issue. Before firing the car up to take it outside and bleed the cooling system, I quickly filled the hole in the floor for the shifter. Originally this would've had a lump of foam around the shifter shaft and covered by a nice "leather" shift boot with a metal ring I have all these parts, but the boot is so manky you wouldn't want to touch it, let alone install it in the car. I plan to remake the shifter and handbrake boots in the same tan vinyl as the door cards, but in the meantime I just wanted to block it off so the WOF man wouldn't be looking at the road during its test. I bought a MK2 boot from a nice fellow Marina owner, and figured I could make it work. This is the less attractive once-piece rubber deal, which was also used on some UK MK1 cars I removed the surround plate from the floor and inserted the rubber boot. It turned out that almost all the holes in the boot lined up with the surround, so it screwed in nice and easy It's not perfect, I suspect cars that are meant to have this boot will have a larger opening in the surround plate, that locates in a ridge on the bottom of the boot, but mine has a smaller opening to support the metal ring of the standard boot. It still works though, and seals the cabin from the outside world. And with that done, I topped the radiator and expansion tank up and started the car. It really needs some nice new fuel, the old stale fuel makes it really hard to start, but the replacement starter is bliss to use and the engine turns over quickly every time. Eventually the engine fired up on all cylinders and settled into a nice fast idle. I jumped in, popped it into gear and headed for the garage exit. I didn't quite make it the first time before the cold engine bogged down, so I rolled back and gave it another go, with more revs, and a bit of a run-up to get up my steep driveway. Apparently, this also meant that I did a nice unintentional single-wheel burnout in the garage Just can't harness all that OHC power! But make it we did. Once outside I got the hose out and gave the engine bay a quick hose down to wash out all the coolant I had spilled (and all the dirt and muck from years of sitting). This little burst of "cleaning" ended up in the Marina finally seeing the first "wash" of my ownership. Yes, it was only a hose down, but already it's a lot cleaner. It's crazy how much dirt was washed away, after 20+ years of sitting and 3 years of me cutting, grinding, and sanding. It's no show car, or even clean, by any stretch of the imagination, but at least I can touch the panels without getting filthy now. Even with me blasting the car with the hose, the interior was reasonably leak-free, except where expected. The front windscreen leaks like a sieve (expected, the seal is wrong and doesn't fit), the rear windscreen has a tiny leak in the bottom corner, and the front quarterlight windows leaked a little too. Once the windscreen seal is replaced, the others should be fine to handle a little rain if I happen to get caught out. The whole time it was outside the engine was just happily ticking over at idle, with the fan cutting in and out as needed. On a huge plus, the temp gauge now works. So what of the heater? well, I can confirm it blows nice warm air around the car, and if you leave it idling with the heater on, the blower on fast, and with the windows up, it becomes uncomfortably warm inside the car. Great success. As far as I can see, there are no coolant leaks and everything is doing as it should. Next, sound deadening and then carpet.
    23 points
  28. If it has methanol in it , it has to meet all requirements for a fuel system So every one I have certed has 'water only' on a sticker on the tank, passes cert and nobody ever puts methanol in it ever at all because that would be illegal
    23 points
  29. @NickJ Golden!!! I was just about to post and spotted your post first. Check out this. It's yet another really useful happy helpful comment on you tube...
    23 points
  30. Oh wow, somewhere along the way I forgot to update this thread!! A lot has happened since 2017... I bought a house, got married, both Nick and I had kids (with our respective female counterparts) and to be honest this car sat in a corner/under a tarp outside waiting to be used for the majority of the last 7years or so. Here are some finished photos Then it got the castrol livery because retro racecar things Sat in storage for a few years at the farm. Did one or two small events. Replaced a clutch, diff continued to whine unbearably and generally ran like a piece of shit on BP98. Car was never 100% but the answer was always it needs money/effort spent on it and we both had other priorities. A year or two back I was doing some testing with timing and it blew a headgasket. I suspected it had been not ideal for some time as it seemed to run better afterwards. Compression tested at 220psi or something silly. Car was supposed to make a comeback 2023 but I was too committed to finishing my Levin to do any kind of motorsport... Soo now its 2024, my Levin still isn't finished (but at least its close!), and we've decided to commit to doing at least Daybreaker rally (and maybe Waitomo if all the stars align). - Picked up a new 4.7 crown wheel and pinion from Weir performance when I was in USA earlier in year (was real cheap with no freight!). Diff bearings replaced by Geartech. - Engine currently stripped down, cam being measured so we can come up with a plan to slap together a usable motor. The engine has always been too high compression (13-14:1) for the fuel. - New flywheel needed - Find some second hand tyres & do some skids. Looking forward to throwing some stones and talking shit again. Will try to keep this thread a little more updated as we figure out what the engine will look like.
    23 points
  31. Ok, update time... really trying to push on with this. Gave the block a good tidyup with new gaskets/paint and ancillary parts - these early SII blocks are just different enough to the later (far more plentiful) ones to make sourcing bits annoying. Clutch was in very good nick but the ring gear was well worn (though still engaging) - gave it the ol swap using the 'perfect for all occasions' Colman liquid fuel burner. While ignoring all advice on the internet I too learned that you cannot get the engine/gbox into one of these complete. But after doing a general tidy up to the bits in the front of the frame/firewall from years of butchering it was ready for some chassis black. Got the final lot of parts on order, need to swap in some new spring bushes, run an exhaust and then we aren't too far away from having it move under its own power....
    23 points
  32. Did some more electrolysis over the weekend, thought I'd pop it in this thread. One very old dirty greasy and rusty thing. Filled up the tub and then realised I should move it outside for the weekend, 60ltrs=60kgs! Looked like this after it's 48plus hour bath And shiny and chrome after a quick wire wheel, until I paint most of it tonight.
    23 points
  33. Also; after work I took it for a quick drive to see how the gearstick felt and sounded which was way better all round. But when I pulled in towards the shed I could see what looked like a largish puddle of oil on the shed floor. I got out to check and thats exactly what it was I park up and look under and there is a small flood of oil falling out of the engine. I tried hard not to, but I couldn't help but feeling a bit disappointed... I then tried to trace it back to some sort of source that wasnt the main crank seal and I can see traces up quite high on the engine. So I start the engine to see if a bit more pressure won't force more out and voila, there is a bit of a river coming out of one of the tappet cover bolt holes. You can see the culprit right there, my last noise source check must have split it when I tightened it down. Fortunately I had a spare handy that I had ordered in case my cursory investigations when I first had the engine out meant I had to replace it. I probably need to find some degreaser to wash off what remains but basically that was another surprisingly easy fix.
    22 points
  34. One of the things that has been bothering me is the rattle(s) somewhere in the cabin. It is pretty loud when the right mid range revs kicks it off. I chased it a couple of weeks ago and found that the door pull was loose, the frunk release was loose and the fusebox needed better mounting. I fixed all of this and it made the overall noise levels better but the main noise was still there. After some testing I eventually I figured out that it was coming from the gear stick mechanism. This has always been pretty loose, and in fact the whole gearstick can move up and down by 2 or 3mm. Someone (possibly me) had hacked a spring in there that pulled the main actuation rod upwards which helped it a bit, but obviously not enough. So I pulled it all out to have a look and shit was pretty sorry in there, mostly the light coloured lower retainer had worn away to something pretty thin. Then without realising it I fucked things up by splitting the lower retainer to see if splaying it out would allow it to push upwards a bit further and take up the slack. No, it turns out, and this was bad for other reasons. I chucked the upper part in the lathe and trimmed a few mm off the underside, just enough so the lower cover could take up the slack. In principle this worked, but I needed a spacer in there to give some additional push. I split a conveniently sized grommet to fit, assembled it with a bit of a clean up and grease, then chucked it in. It felt splendid until I pushed down on the gearstick and it popped past the retainer that I stupidly split... Obviously I then needed to break out the 3D printer, how great are these things for making new shit to replace the shit you broke on your car. I made a first guess which took 45mins to print, the took half a mm off the extra height and printed another. Then just grease it up and assemble. Look at that fucking mad gearstick knob, I used to hate it but now it seems an intrinsic part of the dumbfuckery and I wouldnt be without it.
    22 points
  35. Found out concrete won’t be til next Wednesday as they needed to sort a pump as well.. damn tight building site with the bus and storage shed in the way.. shed will be going but it’s handy to keep things dry at this stage. Decided to finish the ends of the retaining wall off in preparation for many cubic metres of top soil for my raised garden bed. A few weeks ago I finally managed to complete a project I had in my brain for months. I needed a temp water supply for the site and also for topping up my water tank/watering the garden. Got a 910 litre tank from dad a couple years ago which is a good size for dragging thru the bush without too much hassle. Set it up at the top of the waterfall with a feed from the creek (takes less than on hour to fill). Ran about 150m of 25mm pipe and hooked it all up. Took just under a minute for the line to purge all the air before the water came thru at a nice rate. Not massive pressure but perfect for my needs. Action shot..
    22 points
  36. Also.. Seeing various car barries argue over what the engine is from is fun to watch... ...and..
    22 points
  37. Got the gearbox buttoned up on the weekend. Had to trim part of the case to fit the starter and also cut the snout off the front bearing cover and then just bolted right up! Also got the factory mazda gearknob fitted up. All ready to test fit up in the car now and sort the mount
    22 points
  38. Motor is fully assembled, I've mostly been waiting on engineering of some smaller items to be able to carry on Modified primary fuel rail to suit 1000cc injectors. Cut all the 6 port actuators off the manifold, and welded over the holes to smooth it out. Welded a boss into back of the waterpump to accept the autometer sender. Still waiting on the new side mount alternator bracket I purchased to be cut up and modified do as to lift the alternator higher up, the 'bolt on' item as purchased gives about 4mm movement before the alternator hits the chassis rail.... Pulled apart the old blower manifold to find a massive restriction for flow, there was just 4 round holes drilled through Whereas the mani is a much larger oval shape, currently getting it cncd out to match, and maybe a bit more flow into the port. Still won't be ideal, as a lot of the boost still just hits straight into the blower plate, but should be far better than was was there. Also have an AEM water meth kit on order to help control boost temps, and ign stability
    21 points
  39. Gave it a lick of underseal and it looks 1000x better, good enough for a race car anyway. Im on a super tight budget for this car, new sprog popped out and better half at home down to one income makes it tough! Usually would sandblast/powdercoat everything but with budget cuts a quick wire wheel and "subframe black" paint worked a treat! With keeping in the theme of cheap parts i was on the lookout for cheap coilovers on market place and these popped up, off a modern Subaru of some sort a set of Blitz coilovers length looked about right and at $150 the price was right. all tidied up cut off all the tabs/mounts on the lower and ill weld them straight the the knuckle. the camber plates are also have enough meat on them to cut down to suit the ke70 bolt patter on the top. One of the fronts didn't come apart easily and a week of penetrating oil, some big bars/pipes and some hammers didn't make it budge.. a little stumped on how to unseize it without buggering it. I might try a air chisel to try break it loose but if not i will have to cut it off to save the shock and try find someone friendly with a lather to turn up a new one with an internal thread for me. The car has turrets welded in the rear to suit s13 coilovers, no holes are drilled so the world is my oyster really as long as the length is right. the rears seem to be about the right length and hopefully not tooo short for the back of this. For $150 if i can make these work i will be stoked.
    21 points
  40. All going to plan, there will be a floor by the end of today
    21 points
  41. The photos just show how terrible the lighting is in my workshop. but anyway I press on.. picked up my CAD templates for the notch bits from Wooles, all looks good except somehow the 200mm centres became 195mm centres on the notches. Which means the bar braces don’t fit. dammit. I can still run the notches at 195 centres and get them to recut the braces to suit. as it’s mocked up at ride height, the bags fit in perfectly above axle. once the new braces are made I can carry on with it. Including bracing up the front link mounts etc then figure out if I’m going with a watts link or a long panhard bar.
    21 points
  42. The mid-June fuel didn't arrive and paid work has been real challenge due to no petrol for six(?) weeks and no diesel for about 8 days.... but I still have a bit of stale helicopter fuel and finally some time off work with calm weather to scrape out for the concrete deck. Good lord this cabin is taking a long time to begin, but it may be worth it. No concrete can get poured without a freight ship (due mid July?) but I figure on getting at least the deck footings formed up in the next few days. To pour concrete I need water (pipework waiting on shipping), steel (as above), a concrete mixer (thanks for that assistance @nzstato), petrol to run it.... and diesel for the ute to go pick it all up. Oh, and also some money. It all sounds easy. Ha!
    21 points
  43. 14x6, 6mm offset. Magnesium! That looks like it might work. The question is whether to hit them with some mattyB. I like black wheels and these are not so super tidy that it would be a shame.. See poll at the top for opinions.
    21 points
  44. TL;DR for only two lines of writing? Hold my fucken beer I remember I went to a nightspeed drags event at Meremere maybe 10 or 15 years ago. So there was the usual bunch of evos, subarus, all that kind of stuff. Then there was this one older guy there, who had something like a 70s capri, cant remember exactly what it was. However it had the big drag tyres, skinny fronts, absolutely obnoxious rutting lumpy cam v8 idle. Think it had a big intake sticking out the bonnet, and so on. Smelled like it was running fancy gas. This thing lurched up to the line, barely able to move that slowly. Then did this big burnout, then staged annnnndddddd...... hooked up pretty good but ran something like a 13 sec quarter. I remember at the time having a chuckle, and wondering why you'd bother having all of the inconvenience and hardships of this dedicated drag car when peoples daily driven stuff was easily going faster. However this particular mental image of that moment stuck with me. Because everything about the car was a spectacle. Like how it idled was exciting. Seeing it awkwardly trying to lurch forward with a high stall (or whatever) was cool. Hooking a massive skid was cool. How it sounded going down the track was awesome. The experience for the driver would have been absolutely thrilling. It was never about numbers! It was about the driving experience, and this guy was having an absolute blast doing things exactly how he wanted to be doing things. He could have bought an evo just like anyone else, but he made a decision. He wants that noise, he wants that car shape, he wants that driving experience. Then the performance was secondary. And that's stuck in my mind because it's such a good encapsulation of what old cars are about. If old cars did everything exactly like a daily driven car, there would be no point in having them. There's such a variety of automotive experiences to enjoy, and only 5% of that comes from the fairly narrow set of constraints that a modern standard car can provide.
    20 points
  45. That is super cool... ^ On the other end of the scale, I'm a leather Barry now. The ~ 15 yr old leather lounge suite was a bit fucked, stitching coming apart, heat, dirt, neglect, colour wearing off, holes. Didn't really take before pics but apart from damaged sections it pretty much looked like this... It's a good set though, reclining chairs you can sleep in and couch has pop up footrests so I wanted to save it. Started by buying a curved leather needle and upholstery thread, watching youtube on how to re-stitch things, and it came out ok... Then gave whole suite a good clean (bought a Pelle leather care kit). Sprayed it with liquid cleaner, brushed in small circles (I used a new soft shoe brush) and wiped with clean rags, so much grime came off. Then before applying the reconditioner cream I looked at addressing the colour and holes. Bought some bits from Temu, leather dye, filler and glue... Glued a small patch underneath the hole and filled with a flexible filler that takes colour apparently, seemed to go ok... and before and after... Then applied colour dye, just rubbed in with clean rags where needed, the dark brown was a good match, and let it dry overnight. This was first coat, I reapplied where necessary... Applied it in sections... Then rubbed in reconditioning cream liberally, it's dark & shiny here cos just applied but will soak in... Bloody pleased overall, pretty satisfying work, looks like a new one, and has passed furry thing approval...
    20 points
  46. Anywhoo, how about these DRZ4hundeez eh? In between where we left off, (losing and retrieving a phone and generally getting all wet) and now, I've been doing a bit to this and also using it quite a bit when I can. So after our intrepid journey to Puketoi Rd (and back again) I'd committed to upgrading the suspension on this thing. Stock spring rates weren't up to my fat middle-aged heft, and I was finding the bump stops frequently. So apart it came. First the back bit came out. Relatively straightforward, just a bit of jiggery pokery required to get to the top shock bolt. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (23) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Then the front. Piece of piss, this bit. Hover bike chic. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (25) by Richard Opie, on Flickr And we end up with all the gear out, and as is customary to my habits, it all got a thorough clean before dispatching to Scotty at MotoSR for a revalve and respring. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (26) by Richard Opie, on Flickr 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (27) by Richard Opie, on Flickr In the interim, I thought I could better clean stuff up. So I got busy with the brakeclean, APC, prepsol and detailing brushes and really gave it a once over. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (31) by Richard Opie, on Flickr 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (32) by Richard Opie, on Flickr 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (33) by Richard Opie, on Flickr At this point I figured, since the thing was partially stripped I'd do the carb breather mod to help with the wading depth. Basically, it's just re-routing 3 of the 5 breather tubes up high on the bike, instead of all exiting low and well below the waterline. In theory, less likely to drown it on a deep crossing. This is the before pic, you can see all 5 breather tubes xiting low (for some reason someones cut some of them short) 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (35) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Here it is with new nitrile hose fitted. You can see the difference in routing. There's like 800mm of hose from those top ports. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (55)-2 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (57) by Richard Opie, on Flickr When installed on the bike, the 3 long hoses now exit near the steering head, if shit gets this deep I have bigger problems I expect. Bonus was a thorough carb clean and cable adjustments whilst I did this. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (37) by Richard Opie, on Flickr It also occured to me I should check and grease the suspension bearings and pivots, as these things have a reputation for having the bare minimum of grease applied off the factory floor. Cue more pulling apart. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (39) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Now, even though they have grease nipples, legend has it that it's still a wise move to remove and manually grease everything to the max with waterproof/marine grease not only for lubrication but as a safeguard against moisture from both river crossings and pressure washing. The main swingarm pivot was pretty dry, although not too tricky to remove in the end with a big punch and a hammer. The remainder of bearings and bushes weren't too bad, but I cleaned them anyway and repacked with plenty of grease. Naturally, I cleaned the shit out of it all. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (38) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Another "ok while I'm at it" task was a seat re-trim. The original seat cover was torn near the rear and had a super nice and totally conversant with my OCD electrical tape repair. I got this off the shelf cover from Strike Seats and slapped it over the original foam. It wouldn't last long, not for quality reasons... but, you'll see. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (40) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Next thing you know, the NZCouriers bloke is rapping on the front door and lo and behold, a suspension shaped box is sitting there. The heavier rear spring is visible, and some nice stickers let everyone know I paid a wad of cash for nicer suspension. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (42) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Naturally, I had to install it all straight away that night. I only made one cock up, and installed the thrust washer things on the wrong side of one of the linkage arms (it was late, OK) but spotted it before I'd had the opportunity to ride it. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (43) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Anyway, it's all put back together and I even took the opportunity to slap a new FMF sticker on the pipe (which I polished BTW) as the old one was all mussed up. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (44) by Richard Opie, on Flickr So, you need to go and test the suspension, right? Max and I headed up Odlins Rd with the intention of getting past the hut at the top, however our day was cut short by a 4x4 that was dangling perilously over the edge of the track, lashed to some trees on the opposite side to stop it from toppling right off. I did get a few pics of this but for some reason haven't uploaded, so you'll have to deal with pics of 2 bikes instead. We actually over took the rescue party heading in to get this truck out - the owner (a South African bloke out hunting) was super lucky a couple of very eager young lads in a Hilux and 70 series Cruiser were headed in for a bit of a drive too, and they had some decent recovery gear and loads of enthusiasm to help. We hung around for the recovery effort, and were thankful to see a VERY relieved Saffa bloke get his Daihatsu Rocky back on the track and I assume out of the bush - the light was failing so we belted out of there quickly. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (45) by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is where we stopped just before the stranded 4x4 - we'll be back to tackle this again soon. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (46) by Richard Opie, on Flickr The good news though? Suspension was MEAN. I found I could tackle the bigger obstacles with significantly more confidence and pace, it was easier to pop the front up when needed and also, on the looser gravel it steered so much better, especially on the front brake. The next weekend I took it for a 300km odd ride to see Sean in Ohakune, taking in the excellent flowing form that is Turakina Valley Rd. Way faster on the DRZ than I ever was on the XT. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (49) by Richard Opie, on Flickr More riding happened. Some Santoft hoons, again with Max, figuring it out in soft, deep sand and getting a puncture on the road while en route (and close) to home. A quick sprint up to the Mangahao dams with Bliz and a group who'd come from Wanganui, on a variety of pretty ripper machines. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (51) by Richard Opie, on Flickr 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (52) by Richard Opie, on Flickr I'd signed up to a 3 day, 1180km ride from Napier to Masterton and back via seal, gravel, farm tracks, forestry and beaches. Originally I was set to run this one with Bliz, but unfortunately he had a bit of a major whoopsie while helping map a section of this actual ride - more on that later - so I had to hit it solo, albeit with MUCH apprehension. Was I going to be able to keep up? Were my abilities up to it? Nevertheless, a few small bits of prep were required, namely a new rear tyre, a screen and fitting up the Kriega bags I'd kept from the XT. Parabellum rally screen and ABA headlight guard fitted here. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (3) by Richard Opie, on Flickr Big chonk Dunlop D606 out the back for traction on slippery surfaces. The old MotoZ Tractionator was pretty cooked. You can also see that I'd changed the seat out, for a Seat Concepts comfort seat. This wasn't cheap. But as I was about to find out, it's worth EVERY cent. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (53) by Richard Opie, on Flickr And finally, Kriega OS base fitted up with the 12l bags fitted. These, along with the small tank bag and a 9l pack with a hydration bladder would suffice for 3 days easily. 2015 Suzuki DR-Z 400E Phone (80) by Richard Opie, on Flickr That'll do for now - next instalment I'll have a yarn about the impending adventures! Albeit with not enough photos.
    20 points
  47. I have the balanced half shafts back and ready to be installed. The guys at Lambert Engineering in Masterton were fantastic and took me for a tour of the shop and showed me the machine they use to balance it. Looks like something from the 70's and Im gutted I didnt bring my phone for a photo. I'll get that and the kingpins/stub axle installed in the car this weekend and see how it goes. Would have done it last night but I flew to Auckland to pick up the XJS fresh from getting the head gasket repaired. The AJ6 is such a fabulous engine. Going up long steep hills at 100kph on cruise control and never dropped a gear. Just a shame it pissed down most of the way so I couldn't fling it round the corners.
    20 points
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