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  1. Flat six in Cut away under the seat base and the tunnel as per on the green imp. The air saw was so perfect for much of this job which means much less grinding dust everywhere. I've marked out where I'll cut away a little bit more. I'd rather give it extra clearance now than ending up with it potentially knocking against the steel on a bumpy road etc later. Cut off a couple of superfluous tabs sticking up on the transmission for the same reasons as above. Oh I also couldn't resist a photo of the two power plants next to each other. It's hard to gauge sizes from the pic though as the Datsuns wheely stand 2000 is much lower.
    71 points
  2. Sealing up the cut out tunnel top and under the rear seat was to be the next stage but first I decided to make some new beefed up engine mounts. The originals I had made from a mixture of 3 and 4mm steel were probably fine but i wanted to move the crossmember backwards away from the engine for a little bit more clearance. So while I was at it I thought it best to use thicker steel. To start with I made a jig based off the original mounts. Now there were datum points to build to, allowing for extra clearance while I was at it. I popped into G3 engineering where I get a lot of my steel offcuts from and grabbed some 4mm plate. I had 5mm at home for the main backing plates. Used the hefty steel bender.. Tigged the majority of the welds except the inside ones I couldn't reach which got mig welded. Plenty of heat. These wont fail. Added gussets just to be sure... The new mounts now set the crossmember further back by about 5mm. I could now drill the holes through the chassis rails. I made up a new pair of backing plates with extra holes and captive nuts. The plates extend further forwards to line up with the holes that Datsun crossmember bolts through. I can now easily bolt in either crossmember. I was super happy to discover that due to the flat six being only 3 cylinders long I have enough room to pull the engine back so its gearbox bobbins are clear of the gearbox crossmember. I can then raise the car up and away from the engine, all without having to remove the rear bumper and valance. Now the engine was in its final position I could replace the lid on the tunnel, now 50mm higher. I started with this bit and had to cut out a section to allow for access to the toyota spec gearbox speedo sensor plug... Making sure there was ample clearance all round so the box cant knock the tinwork on rough roads I proceeded to box the tunnel back in... Kneeling down on folded up bits of foam and towels was my home for the next few hours... Cardboard trials, then steel, cut, trim, tack, check, weld... Finally boxed in. Another access hole let in so I can get to the top universal joint and lube the gearbox selector shaft. It was a very good part of the build to finish. Seeing it all sealed up, strong again. I have yet to check the rear seat squab but I feel confident it'll fit with some modifications to the wire frame within. Underneath looked neat... Hannah has now painted the tunnel inside and out with Epoxy paint. After I have finished any other little fabrication bits or hole filling/drilling in the engine bay I'll give it a flick of blue paint (hopefully not making everything else in the workshop blue like the first time) Now it was onto the rear suspension arms. I am using the set that came on the green imp 2. Surface rust needed wire brushing off outside... Painted with KBS rust seal (Aussie por 15 clone).. Another bit I could have got away without doing but I thought best to make while I'm under the car was this brace... Pulling up tight to the floor via spreader plates under the seat base... I have added it to brace the floor halves inline to help keep the suspension mounts inline during hard corning. Like said, I'm not sure if its essential but it might just help avoid any weird effects like rear steering. I know its a bit ugly but hey, at least its hidden under the car. On the subject of bracing I also made this little brace... To help stiffen the top of the tunnel near the shifter so it doesn't flex. again, not really needed but I do want a really positive shift action without an excess movement. So now my next job is to run out the brake/clutch/fuel pipes back along the tunnel and then reassemble the rear suspension so I can setup the handbrake cables. I'll have to paint some bits too. The crossmember, mounts, fuel tank etc. The work area looks like this with bits everywhere... In other news we had these treats turn up in the mail, a surprise present from my brother in Wales... He had gone to a big collectables/toy and model show local to him where he then spent a good amount of time asking at the various collectors stalls for any Hillman Imp models and found what is quite a rare and sought after Dinky toy car... Plus a cool little Imp police car .. They turned up in the post yesterday as a surprise and made our evening. Very cool. Thanks bro!
    50 points
  3. Getting closer!!! Next job was to strengthen and close up the rear valance. Pics.. Added internal bracing. I probably didn't need to. Its not really under much stress now without an engine hanging on it as per on an original imp setup. Just closes off the back end, gives something to hang an exhaust on and something for the fiberglass engine cover to latch onto. But hey, I'm only adding a little bit of extra weight... Gave the inside an extra layer of zinc rich paint .. Closed it up.. Flap disc on the welds and trial fitted it. I won't yet fit any exhaust mounts. i want to weld those on when the engine is sat in the blue Imp so its all done to suit its home as no two imps are exactly the same. It looks neat in place though. Speaking of exhausts. I needed a bit of rod for a customers job and went searching through the steel rack... ..and I found this bit of stainless rod with an eye pressed in at one end. Its perfect for the valve actuation rod that'll run along the exhaust box.. I've been having a little browse at various actuators on Ali express and I think one of these could do the job well... https://vi.aliexpress.com/item/1005003796596080.html?spm=a2g0o.cart.0.0.148738damrmWCz&mp=1&gatewayAdapt=glo2vnm With the valance sorted and covered in some epoxy paint ready for a skim of filler I could now remove the engine from rusty green imp. That's the last time it'll be sat in there. Not sure what will become of that shell. Maybe garden art? Maybe just chop it up and keep any useful repair panels in case I have a whoopsie with Blue imp? Its not too rusty and could be saved but it would take another fella like me to do such a silly thing to a car where you can buy better shells, rego on hold, for not much money. British imp fans would probably save it though as its a good solid base compared to what I have seen on offer in the UK. Green imp was then pushed outside into the cold and I sat in front of the wood burner, warm and cosy. I cut the main engine loom in half and let in a big multi plug. I'd been contemplating whether I'd be bothered to do this for some time now and I'm really glad I did for it didn't actually take very long to do. It'll make removing the engine even easier with no need to disturb the ecu wiring under the rear seat. I then removed the gearbox and made a cover plate for the gap located below the flywheel. The bellhousing opening it covers faces forwards and I don't want to fill it with stones, dirt, dead possums etc. Removed the flywheel and carefully ground a lead onto each tooth on the Subaru ring gear. Its designed for a different rotation on the starter and in use the starter would sometimes not mesh properly and make a horrible loud 'gnashing of metallic teeth' sound. Not keen on that. I'd also given the pinion a similar grind so hopefully they'll slide in nicer. Time will tell. I then machined up a basic clutch disc alignment tool.. I refitted the valance and exhaust to the blue imp, drove it into the workshop and then removed the lovely comfy, but not exactly period correct (like as if that's an issue with me....) Tomei steering wheel which will now be fitted into our Nissan Micra. I then cleaned up the lovely Moto-lita steering wheel that has been hanging on the wall for years since I sold my Viva HB. My Uncle in the UK worked for a short time at Moto-lita many moons ago and got this wheel then. He'd fitted it in several cars including a few Morris Minors. When he died my cousins gave it to me after his funeral. I'm very happy to be fitting it in the Imp. It's more in keeping and looks great. I was also happy to discover that Imps and Vivas share the same spline pattern so I was able to use the original nicely made boss. I also removed the stereo, speakers and parcel shelves. The speakers were always in the way and getting knocked by my feet when I entered the car so they won't be going back. Then all the blankets and other stuff that's accumulated in the imp. Lol at the several British airways blankets that had found their way into the imp... Next up were the Recaro seats. Out they came. Definitely going back in though. Might not be period correct but they are lovely. In the future, once I've won lotto I'll get them recovered in a more suitable style. Looking quite bare inside now.. I do love the two tone red/black colour scheme on the door cards and the red rear seat. But I don't love the super sticky flashing tape I'd used to hold down the loom under the rear seat. This stuff is great if you don't want things to move or you desire tired hands trying to remove it. Now it was finally time to remove the Datsun engine. Actually now it was time to make a 'Datsun 1200 wheely stand 2000'. I want to have an easier system to remove/refit the Datsun lump without having to use a top mounted engine cradle and sling - a setup that was due to the centre mounted engine cross member. So I made this.. Yes, a bit over built, but it'll find other handy workshop carting uses in the future if the flat six proves itself and the Datsun setup gets sold on. Fitted sturdy wheels, painted it workshop grey and whipped up a plywood engine cradle with room in the centre to drop the cross member down into. Now in action. Much easier and way faster!!! Engine out... Still a neat little engine. If I was to keep it in the Imp (like said above, the flat six has to prove itself) I'd rebuild it, balanced properly, fit my oval port head, sporty cam, itbs and full engine management. Then promptly destroy the Imp transmission... Arty shot... I stripped out the remaining bits from the engine bay, the rear suspension and cross member. Drained the fuel tank, luckily only 5 litres to bother with, removed it and stashed it away in the garage which is now filling up with imp parts. Brought the green imp back in from the chill so I use it to take measurements from. Measured and marked out the cut lines where I need to chop out under the rear seat base for the taller Subaru transmission. Covered the inside glass surfaces with paper. I'll get Hannah to block grinding sparks when I'm doing any cutting from under the car. So that's where I'm at now. Next job is cutty cutty time.
    48 points
  4. Good news is that the head looks okay, valve guides look okay, exhaust valves look untouched. Just intake valves got pretty tweaked! There's a few tiny marks on the pistons but nothing to worry about. Because I have stiff valve springs, and the valves were held about half way down because of the bends. It was an interesting experience banging the collets out. I may have fired a few into orbit. So need to get some of those when I go to pickapart to get new valves etc. I was also cursing at the fact that I need to take the sump off, in order to get the front cover off to reset the timing. If I need to take the upper sump pan off, it's an engine out job which I dont really have any space to do. I managed to get the cover mostly off by only removing the lower bowl, and undoing the cover bolts from underneath - but then it seemed stuck so I resigned to the fact that I'd have to take the sump fully off. Then I remembered that the oil pickup tube is attached to the oil pump, which is on the front cover - Which was what was jamming it. Ha. So when I undo that, hopefully the cover comes off no problem. In other news, I saw a video from Papadakis racing where they fully made a turbo manifold from 3d printed inconel. It looked absolutely friggen amazing. So I thought for interests sake, I wonder if there's anywhere that 3d prints metal that could give me a price online by just uploading an STL file. So I drew a collector with no particular science to it, just to get a shape to get a ballpark figure. Expecting zillions. Much to my surprise, one of the places could do it for $250NZD from 316L stainless. Which seems absolutely incredible! The prices for getting aluminium printed seemed completely sane as well. For some smaller or more complex objects, this might be a no brainer. So at some point I think I will get one made and see how it looks. Then order a 2nd one for the other side if it's any good. But I'll do some more investigation on what makes a good collector shape first. This will be by far the cheapest and easiest option, and potentially the best shape too. I'm excited about it. It will be cool to be able to make some organic shapes without being constrained by working just with a constant pipe diameter. Might be a month or three down the track though. But thats what I'm fizzing over a the moment.
    41 points
  5. Long time since I’ve done anything Oldschool related, the Suzuki is tucked in the corner of the shed, so though I’d buy another project. So here is my 1956 Ford F100. My first V8 of my own. Plans are to tidy it up, get it re reg’d and putt around the country. It does need a lot of work, rust everywhere , no brakes amongst other things. It still retains its v8 y block, I believe it’s either a 256ci or 272ci power plant, matched with a 4 speed floor shift manual, and it’s rhd. Discussion thread
    40 points
  6. Made @nzstato come over to check out this old bus and lend me some advice on HQs specifically, and discuss the folly of old car projects in general and we have decided to press on. One bite at a time. Plan is to finish tidying the front clip so that is done and it can be reassembled and stored back on the car and it looks like a car. Brake master so it can at least stop itself as well as go. Will save a full brake overhaul till later. Will also start a big list of repair panels and random bits from aussie. Inner and outer sills ill just get folded up locally. Meanwhile, time for some diy panels using 1.0mm for the first time. Also $60 repco mini air grinder with 36 grit 3m roloc pads works pretty good! my compressor cant keep up with constant use, but its great for access and cleaning awkward areas as the small pad doesnt really catch like a grinder would, and the speed/torque is controllable which is much nicer than the all or nothing of the grinder Passenger fender, has a few bits of loose paint here and there and a few extra trim holes, otherwise excellent, only the typical rear corner mud trap rust. Made the inner brace first, Rust removed, mostly for access but trying to keep as much data to line up to as possible Ready to weld, made the drainage a bit more generous than factory Welded mostly from the inside, so i dond need to tidy the welds much So the other side that noone can see cause its behind the inner fender and up against the sill, which i will grind, look such better Then the outer, all welded in and the edge dressed over Got a bit of a hollow right where i couldnt get the dolly into, and its a bit wobbly and hand made at least up close, but pretty happy with that for panel number one, Ready for a skim of filler to smooth it off. Ill save drilling the rear bolt hole till we fit on the car and can adjust it a bit, and add a couple of tacks to lock it in its final shape and seam seal it but thats one rust free fender.
    39 points
  7. Ah man I just took it for its first 'just for the fun of it' blast around the back roads, fuck it goes well. The engine is just so willing to get up and go and it feels amazingly planted for a 43 year old car. The handling is really really good. It does an almost comical amount of burbling and popping on the overrun, I might have to tune a bit of it out. 11/10 would trade again.
    39 points
  8. The correct tie rod end arrived a couple of days ago thankfully before the wof grace period ran out; And so this just happened; And I was greeted by a complementary bit of even leakier wedgieness which was an irresistible photo op; So fucking excited.
    38 points
  9. Dad finished up radiator shell number 2. Looking great.
    35 points
  10. Pulley carnage Made some progress getting the old stuff apart. The old intake pulley has a few interesting things which suck about it. So firstly the 3 bolts holding the pulley together have threads going nearly all of the way up to the head: So when the bolt passes through this front section, if there is any shearing load then it's happening threads against pulley. Rather than acting like a dowel pin. There isnt anything that locates the front part of the pulley to the rear half, apart from those 3 bolts. So once they started coming loose, we get this sort of thing going on: So what I'm thinking is to replace with a bolt that has a longer shank that fits tight to the hole instead. Not on that pulley obviously though. Although, I'm also thinking to just replace all of the pulleys with the newer versions. Check that the locking pins are functioning. Then just get on with it. Which brings us to the next part... The suffering and joy (and suffering) of having a common engine I've bleated on many times now, about how I'm glad to have a common engine so it's easy to get parts etc. But I now realize this is a double edged sword. If this was an uncommon engine and I had no choice to just pay for brand new parts. Then I'd just do that. Sure it would set me back $1500 or something. But making myself suffer at pickapart wouldn't be an option. When it is an option though, I'll always consider it. Ha. So that's what I've been doing. I found the Mark X in the Mangere yard that was the 2009+ model with the later pulleys. I turned up and it's looking like this: Awkward to work on as the motor has already been dropped down. The radiator was stoved into the front of the motor as well. Not deal breakers, just make it more annoying to do remove stuff. After considerable aggravation I managed to get the cams out from one bank. However the intake manifold is held on by several regular bolts, but also ONE fucking cap screw. Which I didnt have anything to undo it with. Then I had also forgotten to bring my hex head bit for undoing the head bolts to try get some valves out. So called it a day. Came back another time. It was easier getting the other bank's cams out once the intake manifold was off, because the chain was already loose. Then to get the head off, lots of stuff needs to come off from the front and back. I finally got a head ready to come off. Except for that I forgot how stupidly tight these bolts are, and that I usually have a long extension on the end of my breaker bar. However I wasnt ready to give up, so had a wander around and found a piece of exhaust pipe that did the trick. Then the valves banged out easy enough. Sure enough they are all caked in shit though from not having port injection. Job done. I forgot how much garbage is all over these engines in factory configuration. Definitely zero percent interested to ever diagnose or fix any issues on a Mark X. ha. So I'll get the valves cleaned up, fit them up and get the head back on. So the one good thing about all this, is that it didnt cost too much. 4x VVTI pulleys @ $15 each 6x intake valves @ $7 each So $102 + some gas money (and some hours...) The best prices I could find brand new parts were around $350-$400 per pulley. Then $35 each per valve. So that would have been more like $1800 if that was my only option. Which would set me back a few months worth of car budget, meaning no progress on other things. Having the pulley blow up didnt bother me too much at first. But after a while it was a bit of a downer thinking about how much work I've got to do, just to get back to the starting point I was already at. But at least now it feels like I'm on the path to putting things back together, rather than pulling it all apart. Exhaust stuff Having the pulley blow up also made me realize that although it was a good milestone to have the motor fired up. There were really just a lot of things not anywhere close to being ready. Needs exhaust, needs more wiring sorted, needs a radiator fan, needs a firewall, and so on. So I'm focused back on progressing on these things rather than melting my ear drums. Generally doing any exhaust stuff has been a fairly stressful experience while I've tried haphazardly put stuff together without much of a plan. So I'm trying to do things differently this time. Firstly came up with a simple sketch of how things are going to be laid out. Then added some angles and dimensions to this from measuring the car to revise this sketch. So then I can always refer back to this if I get myself in a fluster, and feel like I've got a plan. Also have a decently educated guess about making a few sections off-car without scrounging around on the ground a lot. So it's mostly going to be 3" pipe. I tallied up all of the bends and lengths, then ordered a bunch more than needed. Rather than, buying as many as I think I will need then stressing because I'm trying to ration them. I will get the Y section all tacked together and put some flanges on it. Then I will bolt this solidly to the underside of the car, offset from the body with some printed fixtures. Then I can work on everything forward and back from this pieces without jiggling it all around like when it's hung from rubber mounts. Then hang it from rubber mounts all at once, rather than trying to second guess the addition of extra weight as you add bits on. Hopefully I'll be able to fit two decently big mufflers under the car, one mid and one at the back. The bends turned up a few days ago, and the straight sections in the post just today. So hopefully it wont be too much of a drama to repair this head and get it back in place. Then make a decent start on the exhaust. I think working from the exhaust backwards towards the manifolds will make the manifolds a bit easier as well. So no shortage of thing to be doing right now. Having a very limited amount of garage space and limited daylight hours is definitely making things difficult right now. But will keep chipping away at it.
    35 points
  11. Definitely experiencing a combination of wins and losses with things right now. I fixed the wiring on my cam angle sensors, and then it actually looked fairly easy to change the wiring to an 8v supply so I did that too. ...Then the motor wouldnt start at all. It looks like it would work well with an 8v supply, if you use pulldown resistors instead of pull up. So pulled the loom back out, changed it back to 5V supply. Once I got this fixed, the motor would fire up again. Sort of. I guess "fire up" is probably an accurate description: What the hell is going on? How can the timing be obviously so bad, but the motor still runs at all haha. Well it looks like the polarity of the crank angle sensor is back to front. So every now and then it thinks its doing a zillion RPM and then ignites on the intake stroke. So some fairly rookie mistakes going on. But I'm slowly sorting through them. I think it should be idling and running properly pretty soon, hopefully. I've not had any time to fit the exhausts on properly so my 1 stroke external combustion engine / fireworks machine is still pretty bloody noisy.
    34 points
  12. I was thinking "oh I'll just finish X then get a post up" and that happened a few times so I guess I should stop and do a dump. And what a dump! Where last we left off I threw up a bullet point list and left it at that, so here's a follow-up pic barrage for that. I believe we're just after what engine reconditioners call a long block? A long block with a nice un-aluminium-taped surface. Little strips of copper and aluminium tape are EVERYWHERE. In the strangest places - on the insides of the intake funnel, underneath the steering wheel, covering the holes in the bonnet, some absolutely random spots like one corner of the windscreen and the top of the oil cap. Truly the last owner was absolutely mad. The engine internals were mostly closed in. I rectified that by putting the new oil pick up on with a nice new lubed o-ring, off-brand threebond and the nice and cleaned sump and wire-brushed bolts. If we were a long block before, I guess this is extra-long? Then Girlface swung by and we took the engine off the stand as it was just getting in the way now. We got the flywheel sorted out with a pry bar, four arms and three legs. Brake cleaner was once again misused as a non-brake cleaning product to thoroughly clean the clutch and flywheel surfaces before we got it installed with the special tool. This is the one place that the manual's machine translation kind of suffered - it did a piss-poor job of communicating how it wanted the bolt sequence done - but we figured it out. The printed tool worked a treat! And ya know, can't really leave it there before you go inside can you The next day I further accessorised with the new thermostat and its housing and returning the water temp sensor. Followed up by intake manifold - but not before separating the throttle body to install its new gasket. I also gently cleaned the TB with brake cleaner, about 50x more filth came out of it than it looks like it contains in the pic. One thing I tried to keep on top of was understanding where things went. Various bolts, pipes and other widgets are safely grouped on various garage surfaces and knowing where something goes ahead of time lets me avoid doing shit out-of-order and having to undo work, and gives me the confidence that I'm not going to be left short a bolt. So when stuff like the breather plate has a big ol' hole in it, I get antsy until I know what goes in there. Fortunately, my paranoia has served me well so far. The injectors never left the rail so no need for new o-rings there, but we didn't think to order new o-rings for the business end. They seem okay and they're easy to access so I'm OK re-using them. I made sure to give them a quick clean before putting the rail on (bottom injector cleaned here). I had left a coolant pipe attached to the oil cover because it gave too much resistance to being removed. I was going to leave it there, but after figuring out that the final item in my gasket kit was a new o-ring for it, we decided to just apply lube, pucker up and start jerking. Fortunately it got off after a few hard tugs and we were able to apply the new rubber. The old one was quite flat, so glad we did that. Loom time. When we removed the engine it was a pretty mad dash to do so, and we didn't have the manual. If we did, we'd have known we could have left the whole loom intact on the car and just disconnected it at the battery and fuse box. This hurt because the connectors on the back of the engine in particular are a total bitch to access and unclip, especially without damaging the clips. So, unfortunately a few of them suffered. What extra-sucks is that despite ordering a ton of cable clips from aliexpress of various types, not a single one of them is suitable for any of the clips :|. Josh taught me how to re-use clips that had been sliced through the cable, so I got them set up for the most important two broken clips, threw a naked zip tie on the second most important clip, and have left the rest for a later order of fresh new clips - they're reasonably accessible. I got left short a bolt. There was a bolt left for the knock sensor, but it only engaged by about 1-2 threads, so clearly not quite the right one. No idea where the real one went, but I had to get a new bolt from the stash. Maybe it ran away with the shaft key. Hopefully this is the only time that'll happen... Anyway, we've run out of things the engine needs before it goes on the car. Loom is on, turbo's going on after the engine goes in because it fought us too much on the way out, the extra intake stuff on the top will just get in the way. It was due to rain off and on over the weekend which is kind of a pain if you need to use the garage for something that isn't Starion work thanks to the Starion being not exactly weatherproof but... fuck it, it'll survive a little weather under a cover. On Sunday morning I cracked open the garage, tetris'd stuff around, threw the steering column back in the starion and made way for progress. First niggle: now that the loom was on the engine and not the car, there was no way of unlocking the steering (push-button ignition). We solved that by applying a lot of force to a tiny jack on a very weathered concrete driveway... :X ... but eventually we got it situated. An alternative would have been to dig around the steering column but easier mental path. I procrastinated a little by noticing a bunch of rust on the wiper stalks, fixed with a careful wire wheel and light coating of grease. Kelv came over to help and the three of us got stuck in. I always forget to take pics when there's company so... sorry from here on out lol. I remembered I hadn't done shit until the final engine mount was in place. The first two required some manoeuvring to situate, and at least one bolt was swapped with another, but honestly wasn't a struggle. We had a car with an engine in it: day's goal complete! With that done, we could now push the car out of the garage and tinker with it from the driveway or something. No need to wait for a sunny day and mess around with car locations. Everything is unlocked. A secondary goal of the day was to get the drive shafts in. Because existing neural pathways are preferable to forming new ones, I wanted to just wrangle them in as we nestled the engine into the bay. It didn't look promising. But with Kelv and his experienced brain with us, we instead decided to take the wheel route. I'd resisted this just because I hadn't put any thought into how the suspension on this car is configured and didn't want to crack into that with all the other shit floating around my head, and also because of the chance of it needing a re-alignment. But with Kelv leading the charge we managed to break the lower control arms free and bend the hubs just enough to be able to squeeze some shafts into some holes. It ended up being really easy, to the point that we were actually going at it so hard we didn't even realise the ball joints were separated right when we first started wailing on them, and we were just about to get creative. No alignment needed fortunately! Secondary goal of the day complete! It's all extra credit from here. Aww yiss. Whilst Kelv and Girlface noodled with torque specs and radiator hoses (we replaced the two main hoses because... well, because), I rushed to the bench to complete the turbo stuff I was meant to have done already. There's a set of gaskets and whatnot to fix up, and two crush washers need seeing to on the oil feed banjo fitting. Those old chestnuts... Whilst doing this, Kelv sorted installing the belt and idler. The belt feels a little tired and there's a nick in one of the grooves, so I've ordered a new one. We decided that the old belt will do in the meantime. Based on Kelv's swearing and grunting, the new belt will be a PITA to install. He also went off and brought his poorly Alto over to serve as a reference for niggly bits like earthing cables and 1-way check valves. What a tiny-ass country. After cleaning a silly amount of gunk off the turbo, flushing the turbo oil lines with brake cleaner then following that up with fresh oil and assembling its various components with gaskets into one turbo unit, it was time to put it on the car. It was very tight, and the oil line had to come back off to clear the A/C compressor, but we got it on. And then we went to connect the oil line. No matter what angle we took, how we bent or held things, the banjo bolt absolutely refused to grab threads. It was happy to do so without the line around it, so it wasn't fucked or anything, it's just that the angle of the banjo fitting needed to be 100.0000% for it to even think about being seated. Access was pretty poor with lots of crap around the seating site. We undid the block end of the line and that let us get the turbo end on, but then the block end was fucked, and it was even harder to access. The A/C compressor was in the way, and the A/C compressor is part of the belt system, which Kelv had already sorted. Much wailing and gnashing of teeth ensued but we took the belt and compressor back off and with further effort were able to sort both of the banjo fittings out. They were proper bitches even with clean clear access, so I'm glad we didn't just suffer needlessly. Also Kelv put the belt back on so really, I didn't experience much personal additional suffering. While that was getting wrangled, Kelv and Girlface got various bits of bracketry connected, hoses connected, ABS lines refitted, ECUs plugged in... It was around here we were like... "wanna get it started tonight?" Fuck yeah we do. We sorted out the clutch line - it's a bit loose, so we'll need to mess with it a bit more, but on the plus side there's a solid bushing (Kelv has pointed out a lot of things that are aftermarket that totally sailed by me). Apparently that was a common upgrade for the clutch that I was probably going to look at down the line for myself anyway, so nice to know it had already been done lol. Girlface sorted the cat and exhaust. "It was really easy". Kelv didn't manage to exit this pic. We filled the transmission with nice fresh gear oil and two new shiny plugs. The engine was filled with mineral oil to the most perfect mark on the dipstick I've ever seen. We double-checked all the coolant pipes, vac hoses, fuel pipes, plugs, sensors and whatnot. We ran the starter without injectors and coils for a while, which really made the battery quite sad, in order to circulate oil and build some pressure. It was looking a bit dire as the light stayed illuminated but just as the starter was really starting to lurch unhappily the light went off, indicating that pressure was okay <3 And seven hours into the job, what else is there left to do, but... What a fucking rush. It sounds good. The revs are all over the place because of the lack of piping but there are no leaks (that we can see), no weird noises, it's got oil pressure, and the knocking that the car always has is completely gone. We just have a (sort of) new engine now! All the bits that matter anyway. 126,671 KM -> 0 KM. And Kelv's standing there congratulating us and our efforts, "you've just rebuilt an engine!" It's obvious he would have been chuffed at getting it running that evening, but I could just see that he probably was getting even more out of just seeing how happy and excited we were to have achieved this. This second-hand enjoyment of our chuffedness is what really separates blokes like him from the unwashed masses. I got a lot of third-hand enjoyment out of that lol. Thank you @kws, we'd never have achieved what we did that night without you, and that manual you helped organise has saved a lot of headaches and added a lot of confidence in our work. We threw the bonnet back on and zhuzhed the drive shaft nuts up to log(n) ugga-duggas in the absence of a sufficient torque wrench / brakes (we'll sort all that out later), swapped the two cars around just as it started spitting, bid each other good night and went to get inebriated and watch the eurovision finals. Pretty good weekend, in all.
    32 points
  13. FS: Ulta high flow valves, Using stem curvature technology to maximize intake airflow. 4x more airflow that a regular valve, due to letting air in on every stroke! $400 ONO, no low balls. I know what I've got Should have the head off by tomorrow some time if the weather stays good. Looks like the other bank is totally fine, hopefully the valve seats and so on are okay on this one. Juts whack some new valves and cam pulleys in hopefully. But thats best case scenario EDIT:
    31 points
  14. If anybody wanted to see the difference between a standard imp boot lid and a GT lid then you're in luck. You can see the rear radiator peaking through the slots here. Over the weekend I put together a new engine mount. The cert man didn't ask for it but I know that if the rear most mount fails the engine will just plop onto the ground. In this direction it should just drag rather than pole vault the car but having a mid mount will nullify that situation entirely. I was able to put the engine on a slight tilt to get the oil filler tube away from the firewall too. I was just going to cut and move it but the alternator is very close and it was all a little awkward. Hoping it won't affect much on the engine but I still need to redo the sump anyway as it sits too low. The vibration the engine had with mounts at opposite ends has been mitigated too. It was substantial. You can see it here. So I got a stock VW rear mount and just added some arms to some brackets on the body rails. I'll see what cert man thinks as I'm never precious about these things. I had to re-rout both exhausts but wasn't too tricky. One needed two curves put in and one just needed a slight mod.
    30 points
  15. It turns out the crank sensor polarity was indeed the right way around, but, maybe the shielding could have been better? So I remade the wiring, and rerouted it away from the alternator. Still flames out the intake... hmmm. Everything was looking good on the trigger scope so it didnt make sense. So maybe time to start checking for mechanical issues. I run a compression test, one bank is getting between 130-150psi... However the other bank was zero zero zero. first thought was that I must have bent some valves, or the valves arent seating correctly and need lapping in or something. I pulled the rocker covers off, and found that all of the rockers underneath the intake cam on that side had fallen off... Not 100% sure why yet. It may relate to me doing a half arsed version of bleeding the lifters before installing them. As I only found out the proper way after I'd put it together. You need to stick a needle down the hole until air stops coming out, while the lifter is soaked in oil. So maybe it was the combination of starting a motor with no oil in the VVT pulleys, no oil in the lifters, and then the extra heavy valve springs making things whip around more than usual, and flicked things out. Not what I was expecting. I will triple check the cam timing next. If that's good, I'll see if I can manage to pop the lifters back in without removing too much stuff. One thing that sucks about this motor is that the front timing cover can only come off, by undoing some bolts that are inside the sump. So hopefully that's not needed, but see how I go. In terms of removing everything to get the covers off, the motor passes the serviceability test for the most part. The only annoying thing was having to disconnect the clutch MC in order to have enough room to get that side's cover off. I think once I've got a rear firewall in though, some tasks will be a bit harder.
    30 points
  16. Old guy next door who loaned me that big van, died a couple of years ago, and his daughter isn't really coping with home ownership. She's been away ~3 months looking after an ex who was having heart surgery. So I had a bit of time to think as I wombled around doing this, and concluded doing something for a neighbour was pretty appropriate for Anzac day.
    30 points
  17. However, during the pre purchase inspection I picked up a few things in the engine bay and suspension wise that placed some doubt on how far the mechanical restoration had been taken. Nothing major, but just little signs that some items still needed attention. On getting it home, the first thing that I did was to fit an electronic unit to the existing distributor in the hopes of resolving an intermittent misfire. We then clocked up about 1000km during which time I was almost constantly fiddling about to try and get the timing right. In desperation I eventually pulled the dizzy out for a closer look and discovered excessive play in the shaft, so I ended up ordering a brand-new distributor from MiniSport in Adelaide. The new distributor came with its own set of electronic internals already fitted so the old unit went into the parts bin. This solved the misfire, and we ended up enjoying another 500km of trouble-free motoring until one day the Moke just suddenly cut out and left us stranded at the side of the road. Luckily, we were close to home, so I walked the rest of the way and returned with our Holden ute and a tow rope. After a bit of troubleshooting, I pinpointed a fuelling issue which turned out to be a faulty float valve. Got a new one sent up from MiniSport and we were back in business. Shortly after that the actual carby started playing up - again excessive wear - and we ended up ordering a reconditioned SU from MiniSport. Since then its literally been an annual oil and filter change and the fitting of a new battery and we are now up to around 2400km of travel that we have undertaken since purchase. And that pretty much brings us up to this point in time. In my next update I'll cover some additional maintenance work that has happened over the past few weeks. And no one likes a pictureless update so here is a group photo of our small fleet:
    30 points
  18. I've never really had a lot of luck restoring plastic parts. Usually ends up full of scratches or looking just as bad as it did bit with a shit paint job on them. This time however I'm pretty happy with the result. As is fucking Usually the story I was too useless to take a picture before I started. You'll just have to take my word for it being 40 odd years old and fucked, full of scratches and discolouration. Now it looks ace, I'm really happy with this. The 4 square millimeters of it you actually see will look amazing.
    29 points
  19. Well its been a while but I am back. Finally got my hands on another old-school car after much going back and forth on several other choices. Car arrives in mid-May. Has a 2M and 5 speed but will be swapping out for modern drivetrain later on.
    28 points
  20. Crank and cam triggers done. Crank trigger is fairly self explanatory. Cam trigger was a bit more difficult. Is basically the eccentric cam that would have driven the fuel pump. I welded a lump on it and filed it up to make a tang. The sensor can reach the 40 odd mm to get a signal. I don't know how I'll time the engine because the lay shaft that this is on can go anywhere. That can be future sheepers problem. So the front cover and the sump is on for the final time. It's taken so much work to get to this point, what the fuck am I doing......
    28 points
  21. We decided to remove the front clip to tidy it up and make it easier to get to the suspension and enginey bits as well. Check out the custom radiator shims - the Torana must have a shorter engine bay. We got $50 of random 202 bits of FBMP and amongst a couple other handy bits that included a near new water pump, a much better thermostat housing and the extended fan thing. Nose cone off Note the blue inner on the drivers fender i think this was replaced post restoration as the paint is overall much worse than any other panel and seems to have been painted only once bolted on - the passenger side is also a replacement (originally a pale yellow/mustard) but was fairly obviously repainted with much more prep and attention while off the car. Other than the fender rust behind the front wheels where water and mud collects, the front clip panels are entirely rust free which is nice Fenders out Pulled everthing to bits, cleaned it, derusted, and painted Pretty pleased with that, pressed a couple of dents out with the press and it seems to sit nicer too Going through the front indicators to make at least 2 ok ones inner fenders tidied up rad support seperated from the nosecone and all bits including the lamps all cleaned, derusted, unbent, painted, threads tapped and reassembled. Nose cone has similar treatment but just knocking the cracked paint off on the outside and primed it. Looks worse at first glance, but its straight, rust free and ready to bolt back on, or for body work at some future point. Need to sort the rust at the base of fenders but all that stuff is ready to bolt back on. Because my big sheet of 0.8mm is for baby cars, I picked up some 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4mm panel steel offcuts today for $15 + GST ( https://rietveld.co.nz/ - what a treasure of a place - a true barry paradise!) so ill probably make a start on patching the bottom of the easier of the two fenders next to start to ease into it.
    28 points
  22. I got it all back together and has all of its gears so I'm calling that a win. It also does not appear to be leaking any transmission fluid, another win. So then I looked to the wheel bearing situation, and smashed that out. There is a dedicated X1/9 forum, Xweb, which has a lot of excellent info and how to's. I found a great pictorial run through of the process and set to. I did need to make a special tool to remove a locking ring but that was no drama. Octagonal lock ring fuckery. Special tool made by a special tool. That and the engine going in meant Sunday was quite a big day, so I left the tie rod end for tonight. On the basis of this minor last task I booked the car in for its recheck and a wheel alignment. After work I went down to sort it, only to find that the rod end is the wrong one, and about 50mm too short, GAHhhh! It took two weeks for the last one to arrive, I am so disappointed. Anyway. Previously to this weekends shenanigans I had done some messing with the jetting, and drilled the mains out to 130 from 125. So I took it out for a short run so I could bleed the cooling system properly and check the AFRs which were much improved, as was the idle to main circuit transition, so that at least was good.
    28 points
  23. As per the title this next stage of building the exhaust silencer/muffler/back box/ take your pick has taken much more time and effort than I had always expected. I started by taking the blue imp apart. To Woolf valley garage I went.... ..where I removed (rusty mild steel) exhaust, bumper and rear valance.. Popped it onto rusty imp shell... Now I knew exactly how much room I have to play with. Whatever I was going to build had to work with several things. I wanted the box to be mounted higher than the existing one behind the Datsun engine as I was sick of scraping it on steep driveway exits. It had to be built completely of stainless steel, no exceptions. No more corrosion. It had to look tidy and fit within the bumper line, tailpipes excluded. The tailpipes were to be twin centre exit. I had a very specific look in mind and they have to be just right. It had to be quiet enough and yet still sound sporty. This last one is tricky and will most likely need modifications to get right hence the last design point... It has to be modular, easy enough to disassemble and repack with sound deadening (most likely glass fibre) Now I knew the size I could build it to I started by making some flanges. This so I can unbolt the flexible sections between the V clamps and the box. Made to suit the 44mm tube as per the tube off the V clamps. Lifted the big folder we'd made onto the bench top and folded up some 1.2mm stainless. Although heftier than I could have used I've gone with this thickness to helped avoid the tinny sound thin stainless boxes can make. I wanted perforated stainless tube but couldn't find any within NZ. Got some perforated sheet instead - again 1.2... Which I cut strips from and formed up into tubes as such... Welded... Now I had the start of a box and some tube. I could sit down and nut out a design. I have had some basic ideas for ages on how it might look inside but it was really good to sit down and see how it might work. Drew some ideas up.. Nutted out something I think would work well and be easy enough to change if need be. Time to commit. I had to cut some blue steel. First actual act of modification to the imp in my quest to plonk a flat six in it. Now I could double check box sizing and weld the flanges in place. Folded up the second box side.. Complete with captive nuts to suit a lid.. Tail pipe time. I almost went with twin 2" exits but they were just a tad too big. Settled on twin 45mm. Tacked them to yet another stainless pair of flanges to work with the modular design aspect. Happy with the look I then fully welded them on the inside. The flanges will be sealed with a soft copper gasket. Happy I had the look right I cut the centre top from the box, created a recessed bit and carefully welded in the second threaded flange. So now I have inlets and outlets where I want them and just have to connect the dots. Ideally a nice long a route to dampen sound while keeping it as smooth flowing as possible. Plus, as per original brief, it has to allow for easy disassembly and re-packing. There was quite a bit of head scratching with this bit of the build but eventually I sorted a design out. I cut various bit of sheet and put big holes in them with a nice brand new holesaw set. Made little boxes with more big holes... Shaped bits like a heart...(#putmyheartandsoulintoit.....) Welded the ends onto the main box, curved in bit to help with flow and also hide the external bobbin mounts from view a little. Now I had a collection of parts that would come together and form a london underground of tubeways for the exhaust gases to follow. I was pretty happy with the layout for its potential silencing effect. However I now wondered if it might just end up being a touch too quiet and restrictive. Luckily I had come up with an idea early on where I could add some valves. Quite a little bit of extra work involved but the more I'd thought about it the more I was convinced it could work well. With this in mind I had built the middle chamber width to allow for some valves and made sure they could be removed to fit said valves in place. I cut some 44mm holes in the middle chamber lids and made some to valves to suit... Whipped up a little press form to create brackets.. Valves mounted. Underside of lids have the heart halves which help direct flow from one tube back too the next, or up and out through the open valves.. Valve shafts stick out through back of box. Sealing will be by a combination of spring loaded fibre and silicone washers. Now for an exciting point in life that every shed 'Barry' looks forward to. Emptying out those boxes of little random fittings that have been stashed away 'just in case you might need them'... Such fun! I selected my (stainless!!!) treats and scribbled on some alloy. Made lots of alloy swarf.. Ended up with these levers. Pinch bolted to the shafts along with added grub screws. The short length of threaded rod will be changed for a long length of stainless rod, actuation method from within the car yet undecided. Possibly a 12volt door lock motor etc or maybe mechanically with a bicycle cable. Recessed the backs to allow for seals.. So yeah. Lots of parts! Compulsory photo of thing exploded into many bits... All together now with some arrows. Remember each side is just a mirror of the other side (there is a small cross over hole in the centre plate that separates the sides) Valve closed... Valve open... I think it'll be quite a difference in sound and look forward to hearing it. Valves can be seen in action in this very exciting video... So It's pretty much complete except for the mount points which I'll do once I've got some bobbins from engineering shop along with seals. The lid will be sealed by running a bead of silicone which I'll let set before clamping the lid down. Oh I weighed it too. I was worried it might end up quite hefty but it will be only about 6.4 kg once all the bolts are in/packed with fibreglass.. The box will be painted satin/matt black leaving the tailpipes shiny. Silencer mounted in place... View from above showing plenty of room for the valve linkages in place. I ended up cutting a tiny bit more of the valance away so there's room for a stainless heatshield. I then covered the valance with some masking tape to help prevent it getting too scratched while I put back in some internal strengthening and capping it all off. I'll also be adding mount areas for the bobbins. I'll remove the engine next and add in the big multi-pin connector to the engine loom. Then I'll be seriously very close to removing the Datsun engine and cutting out the under seat area just as I have on this rusty shell. Wow!!
    27 points
  24. Been chipping away at this slowllllyyy. DMA alloy tank with intank pump turned up from auzzie to replace the factory tank Have ordered a mountain of speedflow fittings and hose and am working on plumbing at the moment. Have decided to delete the masters from firewall and run reverse swing wilwood master to help with intake/filter clearance and clean engine bay up a bit more. Also measured up my BBS RS currently 15s but have ordered 15-16"step lips and barrels from Pine Engineering. Should work out at 16x7.5 with 2 inch lips and 15x8.5 with 3 inch lips in the back. Slightly better tyre choice on the 16s and fills the guards out a bit better. Have bolted a heap of bits and pieces on ready for wiring.
    26 points
  25. So point of having it stop is to have it driving is so it can be moved around. Driving a project is a good motivator too Point of being able to stop is to drive it outside to give it a good clean underneath, mainly so we can see whats under there and dont get filthy while working on it This car was driven a lot on wet gravel roads. There was a LOT of dirt underneath Quick tidy of the 14x7 and 14x8 Cheviots while they are off with some fine scotchbrite to get the worst of the oxidising off Some blue springs and matching blue AUSTRALIA RIDES MONROE GAS shocks in the rear. Pretty sure both he springs and the shocks are completely shagged from carrying around the LPG tank but interesting to see. This thing is an absolute whale compared to the rest of the fleet Gave it a wipe down with a waxy towel Swept out and tidied up stuff And shuffled everything back to bed
    26 points
  26. So the tank came out, pretty easy all in all. 4 bolts and two straps and it drops straight down. There does need to be a bit of room so I lifted her up onto the big ramps again. Shes pretty claggy down in the hole; And here is the most obvious culprit, the joiner between the filler and the tank. ; I ordered a silicone joiner of the correct diameters which arrived promptly. I took the tank to the local radiator place and he reckoned I needed to split it open to sandblast the inside. We settled on cutting big holes in either side, and he said he could just solder it up again. This he did, and did a tidy job, but he reckoned it was so glazed on the inside it took 4 hours to blast it properly poor boy. He ended up coating the inside of the tank, so unfortunately the paint kit that @dmulally sent me expressly for this purpose will not be used.... Not on this job anyway. So I got it back today and chucked it in, somehow without managing to take any pics, and its all up and running. I'll have to balance the carbs again but it runs ok. While I waited for the tank to get sorted I tidied a few other things, I sourced a relay that @vk327 suggested, and wired that in to run the fuel pump. There is a signal that comes from the starter to prime the pump when cranking, but I wired that to a button on the dash so I could just podge it to get things going if it has been sitting for a while. I also pulled the cluster (fuck) to put an incandescent bulb in place of the LED so the charging circuit would excite properly. This was a bit of a fudge as the tiny bulbs dont seem to be particularly available, so I filed the hole a bit bigger for a bigger holder/bulb of which I had spares. This worked out ok surprisingly. Ill tune it up in the weekend then see what else breaks
    25 points
  27. Dredge from many pages down. I hit 25000kms the other day, I was wondering how many scratch builts actually get used that much.... Anyway, 25k seemed to set off a run of fuckery with the old girl. On a trip back from a job it started to make a rattly noise around 3k revs, so I nursed it home and did some investigation without many results. Then someone suggested replacing the harmonic balancer so I figured why not and ordered one. As I was walking down to check the mail I thought to have a quick look at the condition of the existing one. When I looked I saw that there was no nut on the crank..... I guessed this was probably the cause of the rattle. I fitted the new balancer and decided that the wee bit of slop that now existed in the keyway was acceptable enough, and the shaft seemed ok. That worked fine and it runs quite a bit smoother now, unsurprisingly. I found another spare nut in case the new one falls off... Then almost immediately it started to dump oil from somewhere. Like half a cup per trip dripped out once stopped. I suspected the turbo as this seemed to be on having a crisis, there seemed to be a certain amount of oil getting into the inlet tract, and the bypass valve that I welded up to stop it rattling had come loose and was rattling again. Further investigation seemed to confirm that was the issue. A year or so ago @fuel gave me his old TD05 that was significantly nicer/newer in all respects and had a way better bypass design, this has been sitting on my shelf awaiting fitment. So this weekend I cracked on with the swap, it was surprisingly time consuming, just cos things are tight in there and I have ham hands. Obviously I had to set the rotations to suit and mod the actuator lever position, you can just see this below. Different valve designs. The inlet was a little bigger so I had to mod a pipe and find a new silicone joiner. That was pretty much it, but it took the whole weekend plus another evening, I wasnt rushing tho. I also tidied up the catch can situation while I was there, changing shitty bent/kinked tubes for hardpiping, then bolted it all back together. All seems well now, but I have a trip over to Mot tomorrow so that will tell me some things. Next time I guess it will be the 50k running report....
    25 points
  28. Hadn't really done much with this. Mostly because it was just rubbish to drive. Bit the bullet and got stuck into doing an engine transplant. Brought a well used ms123 crown for the running gear. Gave the engine a paint job rebuild and proceeded to fit it into the coupe. For the most part it bolted in. Had to modify the crossmember and make a new driveshaft as the transmissions are a different length. Lots of small things need modifying as the coupes engine bay is about 100mm narrower and a 100mm shorter then the doner crown. Biggest battle was getting the wiring loom intergrated into the existing car loom, definitely not one of my strong points but muddled my way through. Replaced the steering box with a new one I got off yahoo,so stoked, made all the difference to the feel of how it drives. Happy days
    25 points
  29. been a min so lets catch up. we left on mocking up the rear wheel. it was a pretty rough rushed set up to see how things worked. i needed some wheel bearings to fit the smaller axle, smashed out the old ones got some new ones that fitted and another visit to @Kimjons we started fitting it up i also had @flyingbrick come out and we got some spacers made up that centerd the wheel and got working on how to make the caliper fit. took a bit of shaving some material off the hanger part and we were able to use the oem gsx1100 stabilizing bar on the gs1200 swing arm in the same spots. drilled the hole out a couple mm and everything worked so well! nathan also got busy on making a number plate bracket that also held the indicators going off the above image we were also mocking up the chain. i ordered the wrong sprocket as i thought it was a wider chain but the rear sprocket was a bit skinner and a 525. boyds had a sprocket and chain in stock so bought that and headed out to kims another day. had to space the front sprocket out a bit to line the chain up. put a small sleeve on the shaft and it worked out perfect a bunch of lock tight later and the nut was on! chucked the chain on and onto making the muffler fit hot metal glue later and lets roll this boy out side time to take it home and do some things i can do at home! got apex here in hamilton to make me some brake lines. they were 70 and 75 plug gst which i felt was good with some pressed ends on them. i bleed the system up and rode it in the drive way a bit but i wasnt so happy about the front master doing its job 100% here is me and my daughter wearing all the same safety gear doing drive way hoons so i went and paid a visit to my local bike wrecker and showed him what i was after and he had a vtr1000 master in stock that was in working order. slapped that on and i felt alot better about the front brakes time to pull the bike apart and get some tires and other jobs done hang it from the roof in the garage. whipped the tires off and got myself some road 6s while the tires were off it was time to finish up the rear swing arm and get @Rhyscar to weld it up. made this little pattern with tape cut it down then cut it out of some plate i got from @Kelvin used my old bike rack to shape it up and get it close enought to where i was happy with it trimmed these little peaces of box section up to re enforce the swing arm a bit more Rhys had a bit of filling to do but as per normal he smashed it out while rhys was off doing this i pulled my headers off as i knew they had a leak on them. turns out they were a but loose and probably leaking from the flange but while they were off i wanted to also clean up a few cracks from where dad had modified the pipes from ages ago. ground it all back as it looks like it might have been joined with brass or of something similar and due to that i had to use filler rod to weld it back together as i was blowing holes in it from been so thin thankfully im a grinder and not a welder. i had also filled up the bottom part for a better transition cause i was going to wrap these headers. if you are asking why, its cause they look like ass! and heat wrap makes them look better. see i told you. i put them back on with a bit of maniseal and carried on with putting my muffler on @flyingbrick gave me the hanger part that goes around the muffler cause he wasnt using it on his muffler set up he bought. i made a little bracket that goes from he oem hanger position shout out to bunnings for the steel time to put the swing arm back in. that wasnt any issue but i came into a problem with the swing arm shrinking a little bit..... i think the inner triangle peaces i had rhys weld it made it a bit tighter.... but i continued on like a normal person and struggled till i wone and boom! all together. you might see i have a white front fender as well. i got a mate to drop off some vinyl and i thought id give wrapping a go...... green fender. white fender pretty happy with how well it came out considering it was my very first time. and today i had to go buy some bolts to chuck fender on properly put those bolts on it the car park and then went to visit a mate to show the bike off. it wasnt long and we put his bike back together and we headed out for my 1st ride after all the mods had been done this is after i push started him at the servo from having a flat battery. made it over the divy and the bike went really well used a bit of the tire for my first outing and over all a stunning day for a ride we done 50kms today at fast and slow speeds. bike felt really good and very easy to throw over in the corners. over all super stoked with it! ive got a few smaller things to do like speedo and other minor problems, but it is 100% able to be riden now! ahh i also got the og black plate re instated so i can register it on the og black plates. excited about that! and to top this post off here are some old photos of dad on it or the bike back in its day while i was searching for photos of it with the black plate dads katana with my older brother on it before he got the gsx hope you all enjoyed this post.
    24 points
  30. We have owned this little Moke for about 4 years now and since I'm starting to do a bit of work on it, I figured I'd start a thread as it might be of interest to others. So, first up a bit of background. When we lived in NZ, Mrs Flash owned one of those newish 1275cc SPI Rover Minis. It was a Jap import that someone had done quite a bit of back dating on. A lot of the changes were fairly subtle, but the most notable things were the fitting of 10-inch Watanabe rims to replace the original 13-inch units and the removal of the modern dashboard that was replaced with a classic centre mount speedo. The car was a little rocket and super fun to drive. Sadly, we made the decision to sell it before heading off on our Australian adventure and last I heard it was somewhere in Christchurch. So fast forward a few years and we are now permanently OZ based and looking to get back into some classics. We often thought back to the fun that we had with that little Mini and decided that owning another little Leyland would be good. The climate over in tropical Queensland lends itself to something a little more open and so we set our sights on a Moke. After checking out a few we ended up pulling the trigger on a fully restored 1100cc powered 1974 Californian look alike that was going for reasonable money. When I say reasonable I really mean that after doing my own sums I concluded that I couldn't have restored a clunker to this level for the money that was being asked. So, after swapping a few calls with the current owner together with the studying of some detailed photos a "deal in principle" was struck pending final inspection. We grabbed a hire trailer and headed south down to Noosa hoping to be returning with a loaded trailer. Gave it the once over, took it for a quick drive, some cash changed hands, and this happened: In my next update I'll talk about the maintenance undertaken to date and then a little bit about the current work being done. Thanks for looking.
    24 points
  31. Shortly after completing the above, I got sent to the states for a couple of weeks for work which killed all progress for obvious reasons. Still, I got to see a space shuttle and shit, so that was still pretty sweet. Once I got back, it was a matter of ticking off house jobs for a few weekends and various other stuff, all of which meant it was a month or two between finishing the thermostat housing and getting stuck back into the car. For reasons I've grown to despise, you'll recall I cut the rear quarter panel off the car over three years ago now. Given it is still not welded back on, this is still the main focus of the work. So far the list of jobs I wanted to do while the quarter was off has included: - Wheel tub outer repair DONE - Rear jacking point rebuild DONE - Inner sill brace section DONE - Inner sill/Floor outer repair DONE - Seat mount re-engineering DONE - Outer sill replacement DONE That leaves a very short list to complete before the quarter is ready to go back on. Namely: - Pinch weld seam repairs IN PROGRESS - Repair Cert IN PROGRESS - Properly paint inaccessible areas NOT YET STARTED That is unless I embrace a bit more scope creep... As one does, I was excitedly showing off my progress to my partner one day (who is lovely but doesn't pay too much attention to how I burn away my spare hours) when she noticed that there are no rear seat belts. "Of course my love, it's a 50 year old car" was my almost truthful reply. It was at this point that I was informed in no uncertain terms that under no circumstances would my small daughter be riding in a death trap like that. Which sucks, cause I have many fond memories of drives with my dad in old death traps, and I'd hate for my kids to miss out on the same. So we came to a deal. I'd put lap belts in the back. Diagonals were technically an option back in the day, but at the cost of a big ugly vertical bar the mounted the top hanger in the middle of the rear windows. While looking at how I could do that nicely, it occurred to me just how little effort had been put into any kind of side impact protection back in the day. It makes sense of course. There's a reason these old cars are so light compared to new ones. But it still isn't great. Given my track record with RWD cars (stacking only the second one I've ever owned on the first day of ownership at 18), and the likelihood of catching a rouge mum in a Q8 blowing through a roundabout in Dorkland, I figured it would be prudent to at least have a go at improving it a little bit. To begin with, I wanted to improve the door structure. Any improvements in the door itself would be largely pointless if the impact was able to tear it off the latch, so that was the first point of modification. When we wrecked the Capella for its V6 waaaay back in the day, we saved as much of the interior mechanicals as was practical. Because of that, I have a perfectly good burst-proof latch assembly that just needed to be grafted in. Initially, I just roughly mocked it up to give me a good idea of where the male part would need to mount. Once I had a good idea of where things would need to end up, it was simple enough to make a quick cardboard template to mock up the latch mounting arrangement. Note how it all tucks nicely behind the window track. Like it was meant to be there. Transferred it to steel, and added a 3mm doubler behind it to give the whole area a lot more strength. While I was in this corner I also took two seconds to fill in a speaker hole that I'm not planning to use. Before I got too far ahead of myself, I took the time to sort out the linkages to make sure I could use all the standard Escort parts still. I had to make my own key by taking the barrel out and reverse engineering it from each wafer, but it worked out fine in the end. Oh and splash out on a 3D printer. Been looking for an excuse to get one for a while anyway. Once I knew that would work, I got stuck into the brace itself. Each end is gusseted with 2mm sheet braces. The hinge/front end of the door already has a big 2mm spreader plate from factory, which the brace is welded directly onto, and the rear end is welded to the 3mm doubler I installed before. I opted to go for 25x50x3mm box, just cause I felt like moving the bare door around the garage was too easy and I could do with the extra weight training. Because I'm also a weak scrawny little runt though, I did cut a bit of gravity out of the inside face before installing it. The window and latch mechanisms all clear, and it looks pretty good on the car. So that's the door pretty much sorted. Next is to beef up the B pillar. It's all well and good having a strong door, but if the B pillar just folds in and drops the fence post in your lap anyway, it's all kind of moot. For this, I used a similar design. 3mm doubler welded to the wheel tub, 2mm gussets to the main member, a 25x50x3mm box section, and another 3mm doubler behind the door catch to transfer the load from it into the vehicle structure. And that's it. I've taken to thinking of these braces as "open casket bars". God knows they're probably not going to save anyone's life, but at least they might help give my ugly mug an open casket funeral. I'm also mentally justifying the extra weight and time spent with saying they'll stiffen the chassis up a bit. Probably just going to make the car slower in the end, but ah well, I'm a great believer in the sunk cost philosophy anyway. I've again got more stuff photographed and ready for writing about, but Imgur's hellishly poor usability totally killed my motivation to make updates recently. I've switched image hosts now, so I'll have a crack at writing a bit more in the near future to bring it all a bit more up to date. Cheers
    23 points
  32. In the early R06A engines like in my Alto, the crank thrust bearing issue is well known. I decided to preemptively replace mine. From 2016 to around 2019, when they changed to the Type 2 cars (which basically just incorporated all the changes made through the production of the Type 1 cars), the crank thrust bearings have an issue where the metal was too soft, and the bearings could wear prematurely. The issue is so prevalent that Suzuki Japan issued a warranty extension/recall in Japan for it, extending the warranty to 10 years/200,000km. Unfortunately this doesn't carry over to imports in NZ, and I've also seen reports that getting Suzuki to actually cover the work means waiting until the engine is basically toast from the bearings failing. Their "solution" is to replace the crank, block and bearings; a full rebuild. My friend Tom @tomble with the blue HA36S, who unfortunately had an engine whoopsie on track earlier in the year, happened to order a spare pair of thrust bearings with his order of bits to rebuild his engine. Knowing my car was in the VIN range of affected cars, I obtained the bearings from him, intending to replace them before things went bad. I was doing this preventitively, not because I knew mine were stuffed, keep that in mind. I had been ignoring the niggle at the back of my mind knowing my car could be affected by it. The usual indication that the bearings are starting to fail is a knocking when engaging and disengaging the clutch, as the force of the clutch causes the crank to move due to excessive runout. My car was what I would consider quiet, for what it is. No noises out of the ordinary, but the other day when I drove the car to work my Android Auto was a bit slow to connect and the first couple of minutes of my drive had no music... and what happens when there is no music, you hear EVERYTHING. At one point, I thought I heard a slight tapping when coming on and off the clutch in traffic. It was quiet, and I couldn't be sure I wasn't just hearing things, my car does buzz and vibrate a bit at low RPM due to the inserts in the rear mount... That day after work I picked the bearings up from Tom. I couldn't risk it. Last night, after work, I put the car up on stands and set about replacing the bearings. Unfortunately they are inside the engine, so not a "simple" task, but overall very doable in a garage on stands, with standard tools (with the exception of a torque wrench and angle gauge, both of which are easy to obtain). The biggest issue is that the sump needs to be removed. To do so, the front pipe of the exhaust needs to also be removed, so there is space for the sump. My bolts were a bit rusty, so with a lack of fire-making abilities, I aimed the heat gun at them on full blast and got them as hot as I could (pretty hot, really). With a crack, the bolts came free. I completely removed it, but I guess you could probably just drop it down and leave it hanging if your rear bolts were unable to be removed I also drained the oil and removed the filter. I did this with an engine that had sat overnight, so as much oil would be in the sump as possible, so I wouldn't have it dripping on me when the sump was off. Next, I removed all the sump bolts and tried to get the sump off. The sump is sealed on with goop, and I battled for a very long time trying to break the seal. In the end, and I wouldn't recommend it if you have other options, I used a claw hammer to pry it free. It worked well with no damage, but you could easily break the sump if you aren't careful. There were two points on the front edge of the sump that were perfect to pry from With the sump off, I had access to the guts. It was very oily, so photos will be limited, but I removed the cap in question (second from the flywheel). With the cap removed you can see the bearings. Thankfully both of mine were still in place; when they get bad one, or both, can slip out and drop into the sump leaving the crank free to move back and forth. The bearings are curved and wrap around the top of the crank, one on each side of the main bearing cap. Using a pick to carefully push on the end of the bearing, you rotate the bearing around the crank so you can slide it out Well, it appears I was on borrowed time This is what the bearings should look like; the old ones are the inside pair There was no sign of any metal in the oil, or in the bottom of the sump, so I guess it's just been slowly grinding itself away over 100,000km. The new bearings (and the "good" old bearing) measure 2.5mm, the bad bearing? It's lost almost half a mm of metal You can tell if they are the original bearings (or at least not countermeasure parts), as the markings on the back will be different to the new countermeasure parts Old New Thankfully the crank bearing itself looked great, plenty more track days left in it The crank also appeared to be in good shape. The "bad" side had some slight ridges in it, but was smooth and still looked polished (some looked really chewed up when the bearing failed) I cleaned and lubricated the new bearings, slipped them into place on the crank, and reinstalled the bearing cap. Of note, was that before I removed the old bearings I could move the crank back and forth in the block by hand a small but noticeable amount. Now, I can't. The bolts are stretch bolts, which means they stretch when torqued correctly. Normally you would consider them one-time use, and replace them, but since I would be waiting over a month for a pair of new bolts from Japan, I looked for an alternative. According to the workshop manual, there is a spec that allows the bolts to be reused. You measure the thickness of the bolt at two specific places along its length; A, where the bolt would thin when stretched, and B, where the bolt should be original thickness. Subtract C from D, and that leaves you with a value that needs to be less than the 0.12mm limit. My calipers wont be amazingly accurate, they're ancient and weren't that expensive in the first place, but the main thing is that regardless of what the reading is, the value still needs to be consistent and less than 0.12mm. Because I didn't want to be left with no bolts that are in reusable tolerance once I pull the bearing cap off, if mine were over tolerance, Tom was kind enough to supply me with his old bearing bolts, since he used all new ones in his rebuild. I went through every bolt and measured them All of them were within tolerance, some more so than others, so I picked the three best ones and knew I could at least rely on them if mine were no good. I checked the two bolts from my engine, and one was 0.10mm, which is closer to the limit than I liked, so I swapped that for one of Tom's bolts and reused the other. Using my torque wrench and angle gauge I started torquing the bolts up. The spec is 30nm to seat the cap/bearing, undo it to zero, and then 20nm, before turning to 45 degrees and then a further 50 degrees. Both bolts torqued up fine, and the first one went to the two angles fine. Unfortunately when doing the first 45 degree angle on the second bolt the little lever that holds the angle gauge in place slipped, so I lost the accuracy of how far I had gone. I ended up removing this bolt and replacing it with another of Tom's bolts, which went fine this time. The sump was pretty clean after draining the left over oil out of it, so I scraped all the old sealant off and cleaned the inside with brake clean I then cleaned the sealing surface on the engine block, which is super fun upside down under the car. Permatex Ultimate Grey seemed to be a good replacement for the Threebond called for in the manual, so I slathered some of that on the sump and fitted it to the engine The bolts need to be fitted in a crisscross pattern from inside out, and were the perfect chance to use my little 1/4" torque wrench as their torque is quite low. The sealant needs overnight to cure, so I finished by installing the exhaust front pipe I wanted to make it as obvious as possible that the engine had no oil in it overnight Today after work, the sealant was cured, so I filled the engine with oil and fired it up. After a quick check that nothing was leaking, everything looked and sounded fine. It appears I dodged a bullet this time. I took the car for a drive, and it was noticeably quieter. I didn't think it was particularly loud beforehand, but there is less "mechanical" noise from the engine now. The two main noises that seem to be gone are the knocking/clunking when I back up my driveway from a stop when cold. I attributed this to the gearbox, as I had to slip the clutch a bit and it wasn't too happy doing it. Now that noise appears to be gone. The other noise was at high RPM, off boost, particularly when decelerating, the car would have a kind of buzzy tapping noise. It wasn't a bad noise, but it was there. This also seems to be gone. Over all the whole engine just seems quieter. I guess the bearing failure was more obvious than I thought. It's a good timely reminder that anyone with a Type 1 Alto (Works, RS, NA or Lapin), Wagon R, Hustler, or Jimny with the R06A engine is on borrowed time with their bearings unless they have been changed. Some of them go fine for many thousands of KM, and some don't last to 50,000km. My car has had a very hard life, and at 100,000km the bearings were stuffed and probably had one more trackday in them before it fell to bits. I'm very happy to know they have been done now, and extremely relieved to have caught that before it wore further and grenaded the engine.
    23 points
  33. Aren't they just the cutest little wheels. So glad my fancy brakes fit. with half a gnat's foreskin to spare. I'm fairly sure they are 'straya contessa "minilites". 10" X 5"
    21 points
  34. For a change of pace I am doing some bodywork. After the louvre pressing the bonnet was in a bit of a state from previous paintjobs so it required a fair bit of work. It's presently in the first coat of primer so I'll give it a bit of a tickle with some sandpaper before doing a final coat of primer. This first coat will just make it easier for me to see where needs more work. Also dug out the spare GT lid I've been hoarding which will help the rear radiator get some much needed air.
    20 points
  35. Not much to report, going for a warrant tomorrow. Ive always had an issue in the indicator switch..can never have a flasher and a brake lamp at the same time unless you jiggle the stalk. I tried a few things to fix but ultimately got nowhere. Rock auto to the rescue again, landed this whole unit for about $80nz The fuckery comes from these 4 contacts and the back of the cancelling cam (rewind a few years to when i replaced the broken one with a rockauto seperate 2 wire unit. Theres enough slack in it that the gravity acting on the stalk at rest pulled it onto or off neutral contacts. Well this new one was proper Chinese. I spent another hour seeing if i could fix original or use chang one for parts (the alloy stalk pickup was staked into the plastic cancelling cam and original was slid in so i couldnt really cannabalise it without risk of the slop coming back) but in the end it made more sense to run it, so i had to: -file the slot the stalk locates into from a V to a U while avoiding putting too much pressure on the whole plastic part. - cut both hazard knobs in half and join with some steel rod as a spine because it worked opposite to OEM and bottomed out on the column shroud, and looked shit - slice/shave the OEM plug to accept the chang copy. Was kinda glad i went to the effort of pulling the column apart & half way out to pull and push the loom plug through as i found a bare wire. I'm hopeful this was the reason i saw a wee wisp of smoke exit the shifter area one day sitting at the lights with foot on the brakes. So its all back together and works as it should! Haven't been able to daily it as much as id hoped cause the boss is being a weird cunt about parking in driveway or out front like i always have and relied on. It doesn't fit in the street parks. Have rocked it any other chance i get though!
    20 points
  36. So onto the next problem, I've had warped rotors for a while (low down on priority list), so i had them skimmed ended up with 0.12mm taken off of one side... So went out again, car was braking amazingly, I could brake so later and with huge confidence, then they started warping again. Ok need to sort that out as the rotors aren't cheap. They have also been hitting 600c+ which is not good for rotor or pad life. I brought knockoff makita blower and I put it on the intake to the brake duct and measured where the air was coming out. 30kph straight in and 10kph straight out the rotor at the red circle, 0 out the vanes. Granted in hindsight, its bloody obvious, but just hadn't really through through the ramifications and how bad it was. Fundamentally the hat (GP4 Fabrications Kit) is just not designed correctly it should have no holes in it. One 3d print later I had Testing that alone made a massive different to the airflow (naturally, it's so fucking obvious now) with air coming out 1/4 of the vanes. Here's the old cooling, so while I'm there i may as well do the job properly and make sure the air doesn't come out the other side either as that could cause warping as well. Multiple iterations later we have this So after getting laser cut we end up with these Clearance to disk will be adjusted if it requires it. That's the simple part done, hard part is now ducting the air into it nicely/safely. You can see the technical chat on that here: Fundamentally current plan is to go with a PLA mould and fibreglass/carbon/Kevlar on top of it, then softening/melting it out, I have someone doing the work for me whos an expert in fibreglassing. Heres attempt number one (carbon/kevlar). He had a go at getting the Mould out but it put up a fight. So I've printed some thinner moulds to see if that makes it easier for him. However I think if I put it in the oven at 70c it should melt out, so going to try that too, if it works it's very cheap and easy to make the moulds for complex shapes. Now naturally while the front brakes were working amazingly (being straight and all) the rears are now starting to get up past 600c as there is not a lot of room to get air into them, 258mmx21mm disk with AP Calipers. So work is proceeding to see what can be achieved with redoing the caliper mount and/or moving disk outboard for easier maintenance/replacement.
    19 points
  37. Have also screwed together another block for it. FC 13b S4 plates, large stages with secondary bridgeport- because braps. I have made the manifold side of the secondary intakes huge as I am port matching a 6 port manifold to a 4 port motor, it gives an odd shape, but is pretty much JC Cosmo sized secondary's which is awesome for flow. Have opened up all the oil passages, and drilled and tapped bungs into oil and water galleries as required. FC E-shaft and JC Cosmo Rotors tip clearanced with large oil groove bearings. all balanced up JC stat gears with factory window bearings Brand new FC housings, with large exhaust ports, and have relieved the spark plug holes so you can actually fit a socket onto the plugs now. 4 extra dowels for strength as S4 plates are weak around the rear oil filter area in particular. All new genuine Mazda parts, front stack, oil pump, seals, bearings etc SCR power seals apex seals Brand new 100amp alternator, and side mount bracket - bracket is dumb, its too low down so I have to cut it up and modify it so the alt sits higher and doesn't hit the chassis rail.
    19 points
  38. I slapped some colour on it at lunchtime today. I didn't do nearly enough prep on the bonnet but I'm on a deadline for certification with other fish to fry. The fish being engine mounts but I'll get onto that tomorrow. Standard operating procedure for painting. Old paint. Not enough hardener/thinners to test fire so adjusting on the fly after too many dry spots or runs. Oh well. At least the shit job will match the rest of the bodywork so I'm not concerned.
    19 points
  39. For god knows what reason, the VVTI pulley on the cam that spat the rockers had lost its bolts. Whether this is cause or effect, I am unsure. But im now concerned that maybe the valves conked into pistons or something, then all of this stuff is just a consequence of that. So I need to do a bunch of checks. I definitely hadnt touched these bolts, as they are a weird 5 sided internal hex that I dont even have a tool for. Weird! So this has now officially escalated into a full blown fuck-around. As the bolts have gone part way down the timing cover. Also one of the valve caps has made its way to the sump by the looks. So no shortcut options, its all going to have to come apart. As I cant get the timing cover off, without the sump off. I might get lucky and its just the lower oil pan that needs to come off. Not stressed about it, but just more annoying stuff to sort out. I cannot overstate the peace of mind that comes with using a cheap and replacable engine. I think id be at stress level 5000 if this was anything more expensive or uncommon. But no stress. EDIT: Some of the 2GR guys that I asked, said they've seen this a few times before. Happens on the pre 2009 engines. Apparently Toyota went through a few revisions of their VVT pulleys, and later ones were better. The root cause is indeed when the locking pin stops working, that is supposed to hold the cam in place until there is sufficient oil pressure. The internal parts slap around very violently when there's no oil inside on cold starts. This would have been exacerbated by the very stiff valve springs that I have fitted. So this wouldnt have happened if the motor was just slapped in a car and run standard. However, it's also a known issue that I'm not sure I could have anticipated so I feel a bit better about it.
    19 points
  40. I've been chipping away at this over the last couple of months. The entire exterior is now down to bare metal and I've done about half of the rust repairs. I've been taking it slow as I'm still learning about how to repair cars and do body work. I'm not used to working with such thin steel and the world of panelbeating is much more complex than I'd guessed. I'm really enjoying learning this part of it though, making strange shapes and learning to stretch/shrink metal is a lot of fun. During the school holidays my routine was to make up a little patch panel in the morning, and then weld it in after work. It's an honest life. There were a few holes in the rocker covers, the wheel wells, and the boot that I've already sorted out. While cleaning up the boot I found yet another hideous fix-up from a previous owner, or repair shop. The metal on the inside of the boot, near the passenger side boot hinge had rusted away entirely. Their "fix" was to recreate this structure using aluminium tape and then paint over it in that thick textured paint that you see in wheel wells. Bastards! I've kept a decent run of this tape, with paint still attached, as a memento to go along with the sandwich-sized hunk of filler from another part of the boot. Anyway, progress is being made and luckily all the rust is mostly in the boot and not on frame rails or the underside of the body. So I'm not too put off by it all. Here's some pics of my helpers, son & his friend, who I coerced into making paper templates for the rust holes and some pics of the largest panels I had to make
    19 points
  41. Not too long ago around Xmas I had heard that there was developing interest in my Auntys beetle and so in oldschool fashion I acquired another OS machine to add to my collection. To fill in some blanks we need to go back to 2007, I had a brush with the law lost my license and moved to Surfers for a few months for a cool off period.During my time there I got the use of this thing to commute around I had 2 jobs over there one a part time job at a tyre shop and another washing dishes up in Sanctuary cove at a high end seafood restaurant. The Lil bug was great and I only had issues with fuel delivery when it got too hot. I'd push it over to the side of the road between surfers and Miami and wait a while for it to chill... once I got fed up with part time work I managed to get a fleet job with Baurepairs down in west burleigh. First day on the job being kiwi got the general hazing from the lads and they got it back in equal amounts, they all enjoyed commies and falcons as long as it had a v8, so here we are with the Lil herby puttin about with a raspy exhaust note. Couple weeks later one of the lads had car issues and broke down and was resorting to the bus. I offered a lift as it was on the way home. Needless to say he was reluctant. Oh well suit yourself. Next day I offered again and he decided ok sure. We cruised along and headed up the coast towards his stop. At one of the lights I was waiting to turn right and this guy was beside himself, next to us was a beach blonde in her own bug waving at us. I wasn't paying attention and so I finally had a look and she was alright to look at. I played it down, so the next day he gets to work telling the crew about the ordeal and the bug is now dubbed a pussy wagon. The crew then insisted we do a Roady to Byron Bay via nimbin. It was a great time had by all and a few yarns about nimbin could be told. Better to not sharn on about that too much... back to the main yarn. A few years later... and a few more to be exact Since then it was exported to NZ about many years ago where it got parked in an old hanger and left to gather dust. I developed a curiosity about will it go and maybe putting it back into operation. At xmas last year I headed down to drag it out and see if it was still in one piece. Someone had wired fuel pump on backwards as I heard it bubbling into the tank so seemed like someone had borrowed the fp and then put it back. Got a fresh battery and a while later it barked into life. Dry rotted and coozed tyres were next on the list. 60 bux later we had a set of roadworthy treads the fronts were bad but they held out. 5 Hours later rolled into the 09 and parked her up. The was a mean mission. It's been parked up for the last month just waiting for garage space to accommodate this so we can begin stripping and assessing in conjunction with the viva
    19 points
  42. The wagon has arrived and has been taken down to compliance. Going to be waiting for a big list of things I think but I knew that going into this project. So far I know the car needs a tune, needs some bushes replaced in the front as it was floating a bit on the road. Exhaust needs to be done properly from the headers back, a patch of rust in the rear wheel well needs sorting and the brakes need adjusting.
    18 points
  43. I have owned this car for the past 3 years. It has had a 3.3 engine and a cresta rear end installed. The front end has been gone through with rebuilt ball joints and shocks all around. New dual exhausts that cackle. I have an overdrive that is going to be assembled and installed. The 65 front grill is because I had a 65 when I was in my 20’s. Photo from Kumeu two years ago.
    18 points
  44. Monday. I had a little bit of time after work and before dinner to get some stuff done. I raced out to Supercheap and grabbed some demon water and set our poor little beastie up to get at least some light and tool access. I wanted to take it easy that day, so just put the master cylinder back without attempting to bleed anything just yet (Kelv later looked at it and realised there's plenty room to access the belt with it there so it probably could have gone on earlier). The hosiery followed. I could remove the zip tied heat shields but... meh, some other time maybe, they're actually possibly slightly functional for the time being. Besides, priorities...! I also got her started with some demon water - again, no real intent to bleed the full system of air just yet, just getting things started. The strut brace and ECU found their forever homes, And then the cat heat shield was pretty much the last engine-related thing to go on the car. Let me tell you, it was a proper biatch to get in there. For extra points - and because priorities, right? - I took the opportunity to properly clean up the wiper cowling of its waxiness with some isopropyl, a magic eraser type sponge thing (fuck me that was some effort, don't wax trim people) and then zhuzhed with some Meguiar's ultimate protectant trim restorer. We'll see how long that lasts. Before packing it in for the night we also wanted to give it a cheeky start now that everything was on the car. Theoretically all the sensors and air and whatnot should be totally happy. They were Tuesday. @kws was coming over again with the goal of getting our first post-rebuild drive in and breaking the engine in. He had a vacuum brake bleeder and a chunkier torque wrench that we needed for the hub nuts, and of course his desirable presence. First I did the car tetris thing and got the alto up ready for some brake bleeding before I got stuck in to tinkering. This shot is after I'd reinstalled the bumper mounts/braces and torqued up the bonnet latch. The first real tinkering to be done is to get the clutch happy - it's a light clutch, but it's too light now, the pedal is super soft and doesn't really have much resistance until it's nearly on the floor. The manual states that resistance should come at about 10-20mm. Uh... so I guess 45mm is too much? The adjustment procedure is to tighten or loosen the I was about to get measurey but I noticed there was some easy slack, so I started by just winding it in until the slack disappeared. This brought it perfectly in spec, so I did up the jam nuts to lock it in. The other day while taking the bonnet off I lost a bolt, it fell down into a cavity over the wheel well and no amount of poking around with a magnet could find it. Kelv suggested running a hose down there to see where the water ends up (and hopefully flush the bolt out if it's just sitting somewhere high). It didn't come out, and the water ran out the sill far from where I could get at it with the magnet, so I just left it for the time being. But I had a brainwave now that it was in the garage, what if bounced along the wheel liner and into the sill? There were only four clips left holding it in so I wrangled it off. Of course there's more random padding... in the bin. And the possible remains of a bird. But there's also my bolt . So now the bonnet has four bolts. Still needs adjusting but it's secure. Not pictured: the extreme grot all around and inside the bonnet latch. It got an absolute shitload of brake cleaner, brush and paper towelling followed by some WD40 to get things less grease+road dirt sounding when actuated. We reckon the insane previous owner must have just kept throwing grease at it for some reason, because nothing else was even a fraction as dirty. After everyone had had a feed Kelv popped over. We cracked straight into bleeding the brakes. It was really easy with the vacuum bleeder, especially for me. I just held a funnel and then changed roles to pedal-presser to finish it off manually. Then we 175 Nano mangled the hub nuts with Kelv's calibrated rod and punched the retainer into place. Girlface got the lights and bumper on in the mean time. With the bonnet bolt found, we could put the cowl back into its forever home (sans a few broken clips :\) and install the wipers. We nailed the position first try. Some final clips to install, then the wheels go back on. The actual last of the engine bay bits go back in... including our previous "zip tie the rattly intercooler duct" fix because the clips are too large... And now we're all prepared for the main event. To break in the engine we took an amalgamation of the internet's collective wisdom and took the core of what everyone suggested, discarding the outliers: get it up to temp, make sure the cooling system is fully bled of air (no proper coolant or additives yet because the steel head gasket doesn't like it) while getting up to temp, constantly change the rev's to give it the best chance of avoiding premature ring bs take it out for a spin, avoiding boost or high revs, constantly changing between gears and engine braking to provide different levels of RPM and vacuum to ensure the rings are correctly moved in and out of position as they grind against the bore walls also avoiding boost Step one took fucking ages. Everything got warm but the thermostat just refused to open / fan refused to turn on. The engine cooked off some wisps of oil from where we inevitably sloshed it on components, especially the turbo, but nothing major and it sorted itself out pretty quick. After a handful of antsy minutes we were about to give up and just proceed anyway. Just after I turned the car off, Kelv felt the pipe start to get warm. I turned the car back on and a split second later the fan turned on and the thermo was open lol. We turned her off, waited for the bubbling to cease then zipped her up. There was one minor scare where a dribble of oil had appeared on the floor under the engine. Crawling under the bumper, the sump plug had a thicc drip ready to separate from it ... :X It turns out that while we'd made sure that the sump plug was in, we'd never made sure it was tight. Oops. Another quarter turn and a paper towel sorted that drama out, really glad we caught that!!! Anyway enough dilly dallying... off we go... It was a blast. I struggled a little with the clutch at times, it's extremely light and a stark difference from the MX5, first in this car is super touchy with either not enough or too many beans, and I was never amazing at clutch control anyway. I struggled much more with staying off the turbo. Fuck me it's so easy and every fibre of my being wanted to just absolutely send her. Almost every acceleration event was met with a "boost!" from the passenger seat, the back seat, or both. At one point we decided to merge onto SH2 to make a loop. It's only a 70km section, but I'd forgotten it was up a hill. Fortunately, and I've never seen this before, but a Tractor just happened to be noodling its way towards the intersection with a long tail of cars behind it, providing the perfect merge window. Of course since it's me and it was a hill start, there was a mild burnout. There was also a lot of turbo admonishment. And here I am, trying to baby her up to 70km/h, sweating as I see a literal fucking tractor gaining on me in the rear view mirror. We stuck to the 50km streets after that. The brakes work perfectly and the ABS seems happy. The driving position is on fleek. Fuck I love this car. 30 minutes and 20 kilometres later we rolled back into the garage, with a nice little exhaust graze as we mount our stupid driveway. The engine oil is now littered with ring glitter, assembly lube and whatever else, so we have to get rid of that. Feels odd to do an oil change after only 20km. The engine was bone dry pretty much everywhere. There were a few lashings of oil under the turbo and the A/C pump which was totally expected - we really did slosh it around getting that thing on the car - and some legacy moistness on the subframe because it hadn't been cleaned. Nothing that caused concern. There were no dribbles around any of the sealed surfaces with the exception of the A/C pump's corner of the block, which again, was explainable. The oil looked good, the colour had definitely changed but no water or anything. Girlface helped. The glitter wasn't immediately obvious, even with a magnet, until we emptied the pan back into the empty oil container. We did one last stock take at what was left and... well, there isn't anything notable, really. The two edge pieces of the cowl need to go in but I'm going to zhuzh them up first. The bonnet needs to be fettled a bit to fit quite right. Gotta address the squeaky belt or just live with it until the new belt arrives. Our bolt supply was almost perfect. The knock sensor bolt had clearly been used somewhere a shorter bolt should have been, so after using a bolt from my stash to replace it, having one bolt left over made sense. We also mangled a few clips; I'll need to order a bunch. We did lose a bolt however, which was one of the final bolts for the ECU mount. Once again, the stash comes in handy. I suspect this bolt is sitting somewhere in an otherwise empty bolt hole somewhere on the body, screwed in after-the-fact when i was trying to find homes for things. Victory pose with bonnet not latched because we're fucking photographers Wednesday morning We left cardboard under the car overnight. Girlface reports no undue moistness, so she got her first 'normal' drive post-rebuild. Girlface also thought up the perfect name for her, based on a quip she made last night in the garage. We bought a lemon, but instead of getting sad and throwing our toys, we made lemonade. So, her name is now Lemonade. Lemmy for short I guess. It's a real shame that there's no yellow on the car... a real shame... Anyway, we now have about 100km of easy driving, and 500km of no-dropping-the-clutch ahead of us. It'll be over before we know it, I'm sure.
    18 points
  45. Sunroof is currently out being repaired by local metal wizard Hammer & Weld It's been nice to finally tuck it away in a garage before winter kicks off. Planning to slowly work through the rust before there's nothing left to engine swap!
    18 points
  46. After realising a 50cc nangmaster 3000 wasn't quite the ticket for me, I sold the RD50. Fast forward a few months and a FB market place listing for this popped up in a group chat. Local and the price was right. Another 50cc 2 stroke! 1981 Suzuki A50-II. The guy I bought it off, it was his old man's and he recalls riding it around as a kid, but since then it's just sat in the shed. Last registered 1995 and looked every bit like it had been sitting gathering dust since. So got it home, gave it a soak and a wipe down and it's bloody solid. Hit the chrome with CRC and Goldilocks and whilst it is far from mint, its solid. Shows its age but doesn't appear to have had a huge amount of use. Fuel in the carb and fuel tap had turned to gum so stripped and cleaned those. New fluids, check for spark, and it fired into life first kick and idled straight off the bat. It goes and stops (ride around the lawn) but no signs of life from any of the lights. Indicators run off the battery so they go. Fuel leaks from the carb so that needs attention but otherwise a solid start to getting it back in the road.
    18 points
  47. 2 months since an update, been working on the car when time allows. I'll start with the rear, I removed all the show car boxed in boot trim, moved the battery to the RH side and purchased a proper cert spec Moroso battery box, far better than just having the battery tie downs just hooked through the floor sheet metal as it was before. Bonus is I can actually run a spare wheel now too! After much thought, I decided to try a high pressure pump and surge tank combo, to save space, should be ok for what I'm trying to achieve. All new speed flow push lock AN fittings, and brand new carter lift pump. Fire extinguisher also mounted for a bit of piece of mind, will also fit another one in the cabin. Also had an O2 sensor bung fitted at the exhaust merge to assist with tuning once up and running. Although it all needs a clean, I'm trying not to be as fussy with detailing on this build, as I really don't want another long term time consuming project again.
    18 points
  48. Removing the mud and giving the old girl a good bath made it look better, but also made it easier to see a fair few issues. I think this has been restored once before and there are a few rust bubbles starting and a fair bit of paint adhesion and filler cracking in all the 'usual' spots. I shouldn't have but i started to pick. The Premier sill garnish that had been riveted on this lowly Belmonts sills was holding a lot of mud so i drilled (some) of the rivets. Sucks teeth Ill think ill just put that back up there and pretend we didnt see that With the seal definitely broken i dug into all the suspect areas to see how many repair panels to put on the list . This deep crease explains the thick filler on the upper half of this quarter panel, the filler probably made the rust on the lower half worse. Removing the deep filler means the door shut looks 100x better than it did Good 5mm of filler of this too, and much the same on the other side, except that side has braze as well There were signs of lots of filler on this quarter too. It has also been (previously?) brazed some of the filler was 10mm thick Took most of it off with a heat gun, much less messy than with a whirlywoo. The panel looked like this underneath it, from a prang in the rear Spent a bit of time with some hammers and dollies and a bit of extra heat trying to shrink some spots and it is quite a lot better. Like the other side, removing the filler also significantly improved the fit of the doors to the body! So yeah, some bits are pretty much as i expected (doors) some are much much better than i feared (quarter panels, cowls) , but some i didnt even suspect, like the sills, are quite bad indeed. We will need every patch panel you can buy, which basically means its got bitten in all the usual places, but that is a nice change from not being able to buy any panels at all!
    18 points
  49. Panel Barry is a stickler for door gaps. Suppose he wouldn't be panel Barry if he wasn't a gap commander. These dogleg panels (his words) which cover the front portion of the rear arch were not lined up well with the doors and it was throwing off some other things. These little panels have always been messed up since I got it, probably since 30 years ago to be fair. So out comes the cutting and welding tools again. The doors also weren't perfect so fixed that up on both sides. I'm happy to hear, and his words "This is the end of the real time consuming type of repairs". We'll see about that I suppose as he works the front.
    18 points
  50. Got the chance to fuck around with 5his wreck again today. Plumbed in an electric fuel pump. (It was a GMB unit for a subaru leone, bought from rock auto as a lift pump for my 620 ute) but it couldnt suck any gas through either. Like an utter fucktard, i inverted the pump polarity. (That did nothing, no buzz) So i switched it back. That now did nothing too. Then some smoke escaped from the pump. So a brand new pump that never even saw gas once is now destined for the bin. (Its very fortunate rock auto is so cheap) So i popped the gas cap, and jammed 120psi down the fuel supply line to the tank. It didnt really seem like it was pushing much. The old boy showed up, so he shot the air in while i listened at the fuel filler hole. Didnt sound like much. then a huge rush of air burst through. Obviously since it sat so long, the gas had turned to shit and blocked the line. So sooner or later the gas tank will need to come out for a de-scuzzing. So i reconnected the mechanical fuel pump, and cranked it over. The fuel filter quickly filled up, and it burst into life. (Sort of) ran a bit wooly. And wouldnt stay running on the main fuel circuit. 99% sure the old gas in the bowls has turned to varnish, and blocked the jets/capillaries. I dumped 2/3rd of a bottle of CRL into the radiator, and filled the rest up with water. Which involved another fuck around trying to get the hose working. (I took a bucket of miscellaneous hose fittings over with me) Using generous lashing of pedal pumping, i kept it running long enough warm it up. then drained the rad, and repeated a few times. Later i plucked the thermostat, and hosed the block out a few times. Eventually the stuff coming out looked clean. The old boy asked if i wanted him to clean the carb out for me. (Hes just build a 750 DP for his VF, and it piecing together another 650DP 5hat he got for free) since hes semi retired, i said yeah go on. (Im quite time poor) so i whipped it off and gave it to him. (The fuel that dribbled out the bowl vents onto the lawn to empty them was fucking putrid) (the colour of a dehydrated piss, and even more stanky) The manifold is an Edelbrock "street master". Which is a single plane open plenium. But its a design from the post oil shock '70s. (Apparently it won some award in its day) So despite being single plane, its got quite a small plenium volume. Somebody on a mopar forum filled with clever people reckoned they pull quite hard to 4000. This manifold also has the smaller ports to match with the 318 ports. (340 and 360 are bigger) im running a 390cfm 4bbl carb. The small carb means higher air speed. Which makes for really sharp bottom end response. (It should pair nicely with this manifold) the last engine this carb was one was quite punchy down low too. I strongly suspect that it will benefit from a carb spacer. As luck would have it, i picked up a carb spacer a while ago that will spice things up once i get the vehicle back on the road. This carb spacer is tunable up to 250hp. Although i suspect aiming that high would be a one way ticket to a sump full of piston fragments. Then focus shifted to my pile of diffs. Fairly sure the diff isnt an LSD. Since ive pulled apart so many Vals over the years, ive got a good collection. I had the idea in my head one of them was a 3.23:1 lsd. However after removing the back plates to check the ratio on four different VG valiant diffs, apparently none were fittes with that ratio. (And only one was an LSD) You can identify a bougie warner M75 LSD by the extra set of bolts which hold the halves of the nugget together. So after lugging heavy diffs about, and touching gear oil that was put in these diffs possibly before some of you were born, i shelved that persuit. Ive got an LSD nugget that i scored off @unlimitedpower a long ways back. (Reportedly scavanged from a EA-ish falcon) this will be pulled down, inspected, and set back up to the factory spec. (Way back when i first joined OS i bought a Factory VH valiant workshop manual of somebody on here. It has the specs these are supposed to be set up to) If I remember to take pictures, ill do a post when that gets done. So coupled with cutting the grass, i finished the day stinking of gear oil, and stale gas. (And because theres no proper hand cleaner at mums, i had to use cold water surf. (Well, the Pams equivalent)
    17 points
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