sr2

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About sr2

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 02/08/1956

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Music, Cars, bikes, boats, family, more family and good Bourbon.

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    Auckland

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  1. As those who are more familiar with us will know both Rigamortice and myself have a great affinity for the environment and take climate change (i.e. the thing we used to “call global warming” before it got cold again!) very seriously. Stricken by remorse and overwhelmed by guilt over the tons of negative carbon credits I’ve released on the global economy through years of motor racing, driving cars for the love of it, and behaving like a typical older ‘Oldschool’ member I have acquired an EV! You may scoff at the fact that it’s a clapped out old warehouse sweeper with buggered batteries saved from the scrap heap but to Rigamortice and myself it is a powerful symbol of our indefatigable commitment to a green and politically correct future. With help from my brother providing advice, encouragement and the Wild Turkey may I present the definitive green, negative carbon credit, EV solution to taking the wheelie bins out when you live down a long driveway. Commentary and camera work courtesy of the ever lovely Mrs sr2.
  2. As always both Rigamortice and myself welcome unsolicited advice, adulation, various forms of verbal abuse (as long as it’s entertaining) and are totally open to most popular forms of bribery and coercion (Wild Turkey works well) on our discussion thread. https://oldschool.co.nz/index.php?/topic/49843-sr2%E2%80%99s-1947-vauxhall-%E2%80%9Crigamortice%E2%80%9D-discussion-thread/&page=5
  3. Thought it was about time to have a look at my favorite DCD Weber; we go back a long way, purchased new in 1974 it was looking a little 2nd hand. Stripped it down and on closer inspection the throttle spindles showed little almost no wear and the call was made to give it a good clean and assemble with a new float valve and gaskets. Finally located a rebuild kit from MLP Carbs in Victoria, (don’t you hate it when bloody Aussies turn out to be good guys……!). After an enjoyable evening in the world famous sr2 man cave rattling the neighbourhood with Pink Floyd playing loud and ½ a bottle of cheap (ish) pinot noir - one more job’s ticked off the list.
  4. Respect given and well deserved mate. A fine, particularly impracticable choice in motors!
  5. After making the call to take the block out to 60 thou oversize (hard to argue with an internal micrometer) the hunt was on for suitable pistons. Problem is these motors were designed to run on leaded 100 octane petrol (yes real lead, the stuff pre-millennial ‘real jokers’ used to have in their pencils!) and the best we can buy in our modern times is BP98. To add another problem both the head and block had probably been decked a number of times and I was now planning on pushing 208 CI displacement into a 186 head. With flat top pistons off the menu I managed to track down a set of ‘new old stock’ .060” over JCC dished pistons in Australia complete with pins and chrome moly rings. You have to love the 30 plus year old tea cup stain on the end of the box, if they could talk I'm sure these ‘new old’ spares could tell some stories.
  6. Finally picked up the finished counterbalance crank; big thanks to Engine Specialties for a not cheap but a hard job well done, good value in my books-thanks guys. Crack tested, big ends ground 10 thou, main journals reduced to fit the X2 186 block, rear seal converted from rope to neoprene (once more to fit the block) and a full balance. They insisted on supplying their preferred bearing shells and how can you argue with a bunch of guys taking full ownership of their work? For an old Holden 6 junkie, this is nothing less than pure crankshaft porn!
  7. sr2

    Coil info - help

    Is it an aftermarket dizzy or one from a VB - VK Commodore?
  8. The terminology has always been confusing. A 'ballasted coil' is one that needs to be run with an external ballast where as a 'non ballasted coil' is one that has an internal ballast. As a quick rule of thumb the primary winding on an average 'non-ballasted' coil is around 3 ohms while a ballasted one should be approx. 1.5 ohms.
  9. sr2

    Oddball bolt suppliers in New Zealand?

    Same for me, I've always had great service from the Archers rd Bolt Shop.
  10. Not sure what I can add to what has been posted so far but with brakes the rule of thumb is invariably ‘bigger is better’. As previously stated increasing the rotor diameter while retaining the original calipers (and pad area) will in most cases improve braking simply through the point of friction being further away from the center of the hub (i.e. more leverage). You will also increase the speed differential between the rotor surface and the pads which in turn will generate more heat (i.e. increased stopping power). To break (excuse the pun!) it down to its simplest form, any friction braking system is a two stage process; 1: the conversion of kinetic energy into heat and 2: the dissipation of the heat. For the 2nd part of the process using a larger rotor gives a significant gain by increasing the surface area where heat transfer (metal to air) takes place. Be aware that you will be increasing un-sprung weight, there could be a shift in brake bias and a change in pad material, and fluid type may need to be considered. My own personal opinion is that for street driving there is possibly another gain from the larger mass of the rotor increasing the ‘heat soak’ capacity of a braking system in an emergency, single application scenario, (i.e. an emergency stop). I don’t have any hard data to back this up but would love to look at it further in a controlled environment. Hope this helps.
  11. sr2

    32/36 dgv weber issues

    28/36 DCD would have been my pick.
  12. Another new/old Trademe score was a late 50’s “Miles Master” fuel pressure regulator, (SU’s need only a few lbs of fuel pressure). I was going to use a modern conventional 3.5 psi regulator but how could you resist both the packaging not to mention the sales pitch; and how could a mere mortal question the 30 day money back guarantee? Have to point out that both Rigamortice and I were somewhat let-down with the discovery that there was no ‘free set of Ginzu steak knives’ included in the transaction, but we just keep falling in love with this stuff. It’s history.
  13. The initial plan was to replace the Spindles and Spindle Bushes and then re-kit the carbs but I managed to track down 3 new/old stock HS6 carbs for a fraction of the price – sometimes you just get lucky! The guy I bought them off even threw in a carb balancer and a Colortune Kit to sweeten the deal, there’s some good sorts out there.
  14. Some six months or so ago, after considerable research, (drunken chewing of the fat with our mates) and in depth self-analysis, (a Bottle of 101 Wild Turkey) both Rigamortice and myself came to the inevitable conclusion that the ideal carburation solution for the new 208ci “186 X2” had to be the period correct set of 3x 1¾ HS6 SU carbs on the vintage Speco manifold. We will however run the motor in and get the dodgy legals done with the tried and proven Weber DCD setup. (Anyone after a triple set of 40 DEOCE’s and a 9 port manifold – just ask). I did a quick dummy assembly with a spare motor for a bit of man-cave decoration.
  15. You'll have to let on, the suspense is killing us! I'm hoping it will be a totally impracticable and at the least able to be described as an unwieldy one of a kind solution to a problem that that never existed in the first place.