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Random slightly cool stuff you built but not worth its own thread, thread


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Used to have to do that monthly to the logic board in my Macbook, worked flawlessly until I put it in a glass roasting dish with a convex base, just twisting the board enough that half the surface mount parts fell off. 

Used a strip of thin solder next to the board to get a guess on temp

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On 2/19/2018 at 21:58, NickJ said:

Used to have to do that monthly to the logic board in my Macbook, worked flawlessly until I put it in a glass roasting dish with a convex base, just twisting the board enough that half the surface mount parts fell off. 

Used a strip of thin solder next to the board to get a guess on temp

Yep, watch the radiant from the element, temp can be higher than on the dial.

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4 hours ago, h4nd said:

Yep, watch the radiant from the element, temp can be higher than on the dial.

That jogs the brain, I used tin foil to shield the plastic sockets etc, should have been ok, but I wasn't keen on taking too much risk.

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On 2/19/2018 at 21:58, NickJ said:

Used to have to do that monthly to the logic board in my Macbook, worked flawlessly until I put it in a glass roasting dish with a convex base, just twisting the board enough that half the surface mount parts fell off. 

Used a strip of thin solder next to the board to get a guess on temp

Unfortunately solders can melt at vastly different temps. Iv had some that didn't want to melt at all with iron until i put normal solder on top (may have been a different issue?)

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9 minutes ago, flyingbrick said:

Unfortunately solders can melt at vastly different temps. Iv had some that didn't want to melt at all with iron until i put normal solder on top (may have been a different issue?)

Apart from specialised cases, all electrical solders have a melting point around 200degC (true eutectic is 190 from memory) the biggest issue is getting heat into a joint, if you have two convex surfaces (iron tip and joint) then the heat path is minimal, a dab of solder increases the heat path area and all is happiness. In extreme cases, the eutectic may shift from compositional changes, this can happen in brazing, where once a part is flowed, it takes a higher temp to release the joint, but i'm unsure if this is documented in solder?

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