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For Questions Regarding WOFs/CERTs/NUMBER PLATEs


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1 hour ago, cletus said:
3 hours ago, AllTorque said:

I'd be happy to be incorrect on this one, but I cant find anything in the virm that says there are different requirements for trucks and cars apart from the different requirements for dual wheel vehicles

My interpretation is a vehicle either has individual mudguards or a body panel mudguard. Like most of the virm it is unclear.

Any time I have called nzta for help they tell me to use my judgment.

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I currently spend a substantial part of my working day reviewing documentation for building quite complex machinery, this is not only for our assembly team but also to satisfy various directives and certification standards from around the world that we are subjected to.

Biggest learning is not to do the usual human response and try to control every detail, the art is in conveying the design intent of each particular assembly without constraints, be that tooling, process or parts. For example, if I put down 'torque fastener to 200Nm' I then need to ensure there are torque wrenches available at that station, they are then subject to quality control, periodic inspection and calibration, Additionally, I will need to justify why that torque is specified so that the next engineer understands why that is stated. If the above fastener is not structural and once loaded could fall out with no il-effect, the effort above is quite wasteful.

Whenever i've tried to be fancy with describing a process, it has backfired, not in a physical failure, but in restricting movements without rewriting existing documents. I would say it is clear to everyone here that in an effort to define a mudflap (noble intent) this is rearing up to be quite an own goal.

While arbitrary rules also hurt, in the case of the mudflap, what is the intent? is there real harm from lack of full coverage? Your pics Cletus seem to shut down the whole discussion quite visibly, unless rally flaps for all?

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14 hours ago, NickJ said:

I currently spend a substantial part of my working day reviewing documentation for building quite complex machinery, this is not only for our assembly team but also to satisfy various directives and certification standards from around the world that we are subjected to.

Biggest learning is not to do the usual human response and try to control every detail, the art is in conveying the design intent of each particular assembly without constraints, be that tooling, process or parts. For example, if I put down 'torque fastener to 200Nm' I then need to ensure there are torque wrenches available at that station, they are then subject to quality control, periodic inspection and calibration, Additionally, I will need to justify why that torque is specified so that the next engineer understands why that is stated. If the above fastener is not structural and once loaded could fall out with no il-effect, the effort above is quite wasteful.

Whenever i've tried to be fancy with describing a process, it has backfired, not in a physical failure, but in restricting movements without rewriting existing documents. I would say it is clear to everyone here that in an effort to define a mudflap (noble intent) this is rearing up to be quite an own goal.

While arbitrary rules also hurt, in the case of the mudflap, what is the intent? is there real harm from lack of full coverage? Your pics Cletus seem to shut down the whole discussion quite visibly, unless rally flaps for all?

Wow ! :shock:- that seems all very complex for your work that builds wheel barrows!!!!

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15 minutes ago, yoeddynz said:

Wow ! :shock:- that seems all very complex for your work that builds wheel barrows!!!!

As chief engineer of wheelbarrow alignments, I take my role preserving even tyre wear very seriously!

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Would I require a cert for fitting a strut brace like this? Goes between the two rear strut towers, but requires two holes in each strut tower to be drilled for the bolts. It'd be in the back of the Carib/Wagon but same concept. @KKtrips @cletus

Ultra-Racing-Rear-Strut-Bar-for-TOYOTA-C

a2b3bcbcf316d5193af61e27f2417646

 

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How much point is there actually having a brace like that? Does the whole car flex that much? Probably don't need to tag them in here, they frequent often enough ;) 

[ling]you're modifying the structure of the vehicle so my guess is needs a cert[/ling]

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52 minutes ago, Bling said:

How much point is there actually having a brace like that? Does the whole car flex that much? Probably don't need to tag them in here, they frequent often enough ;) 

[ling]you're modifying the structure of the vehicle so my guess is needs a cert[/ling]

Compared to the liftback it flexes like a wet paper towel. Creaks going up curbs and things. 

Fitting a rear brace to a legacy wagon made a huge difference in feel, so I'm hoping for the same with the Carib, but the design of the strut tops makes mounting a brace in the normal way a bit shit (and there are zero off the shelf options for the wagon as it's different to the coupe/sedan). 

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I originally read that as saying it should bolt to the original mountng holes, but I guess that's not what it means. 

 

It's a luggage rack isn't it anyway :wink:

 

Linging here, but you can also do a mid brace across behind the front seats and use the lower belt bolts to mount it

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I was talking to the local Repair Certifier yesterday and he suggested that doing the iCar welding test and certification would be a 'good thing' for getting approval on the woodie structural work.

So, I guess I better do that. It doesn't seem to need any formal associated with a business so that's good.

It is kind of spendy though

https://i-car.co.nz/course/automotive-steel-mig-welding-qualification-assessment/

 

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