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had a look on the cert website and I think I should be ok, I can bring my exhaust out the side of my cruiser behind the drivers door? this is just a rough position for reference. theres no opening windows behind the drivers door etc. also would like to weld the exhaust hangers to the body mounts that come off the chassis, I can't see that being a problem? thanks  

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Pretty sure it used to be 150mm past the rear most side door for exhaust pipe exit?

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42 minutes ago, MaxPower said:

had a look on the cert website and I think I should be ok, I can bring my exhaust out the side of my cruiser behind the drivers door? this is just a rough position for reference. theres no opening windows behind the drivers door etc. also would like to weld the exhaust hangers to the body mounts that come off the chassis, I can't see that being a problem? thanks  

Nope.

Need to be like half a foot or something from an opening/ behind rear passenger seats.

 

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The cert rule says it must

"terminate in a position where the outer end of the exhaust pipe is not directly underneath the passenger compartment"

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Exhaust Systems
2.3(9) An exhaust system fitted to a low volume vehicle must:
 (a) be of a good design using materials suitable for the purpose; and
 (b) terminate in a position where the outer end of the exhaust pipe is not directly underneath or in front of the passenger compartment; and
 (c) in the case of an external exhaust system which extends beyond the outer longitudinal extremity of the vehicle or the outer sidewall of the tyres:
 (i) have a radius of no less than 3 mm on any sections facing toward the front of the vehicle; and
 (ii) have any sections of exposed exhaust contactable from the front of the vehicle or adjacent to points of occupant entry and exit adequately heat-shielded;
 and
 (d) be in good condition and free of leaks; and
 (e) be securely attached to the vehicle, using a mounting system that enables all necessary engine movement without stressing the exhaust system; and
 (f) along with the body of a low volume vehicle in the areas adjacent to the vehicle’s exhaust system, be sufficiently sealed so as to prevent the entry of any exhaust gases into the passenger compartment, and
 (g) be designed, constructed, and fitted in such a way that the exhaust system, or components within the exhaust system, cannot be removed, altered, or interfered with, without the use of hand tools.
 

 

I think you will be fine.

 

as a side note that whole 12 inches past the last opening window thing and the variations I hear on it, are old wives tales, or its a rule in Australia or something, I looked into it years ago and couldn't find any requirement like that in NZ. 

it was in 2016 that they added "in front of" to line (b), before that you could certify a hot rod with this style of exhaust if you could get it quiet enough

Image result for limefire headers

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23 hours ago, a.craw4d said:

@cletus Have you ever seen something like this?

https://www.stanceparts.com/air-cup-lift-system/

image.jpeg.61fb1012a4505f805eda7a8c07595db5.jpeg

Do you think it would be able to be certified here?

possibly. I think someone got some approved for use thru LVVTA,

IMO a bit pointless though if you wanted to set it up legally, as far as I know they are only designed to raise the suspension to clear bumps or driveways etc- they are not designed to be driven on inflated, so would have limited travel

ie if the coilover spring is set up so it has zero preload with the cup deflated (so the spring is still captive at normal ride height)

then that only gives you as much lift, as the suspension has droop travel (ie till the shocks top out- this is usually 30-50mm for most common bolt in coil overs like BC etc)

and you wouldn't be able to drive it like that apart from slow speed stuff and even then you could get stuck when it picks a wheel up off the ground going in a driveway

and  would still need the same control system as a normal bag setup ie compressor, tank, 8x valves etc

and they are not cheap

I think bags would be better- at least then you could drop it on to the bumpstops when parked instead of normal ride height

could argue that a car may handle better with springs rather than bags but I think if someone was more concerned with handling then they wouldn't be fitting stuff like this to a car anyway

 

also I saw some on an import 300c last week and the front ones appeared to be knackered due to road shit getting up in the cup- they didn't work very well

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Thanks @cletus

Yeah they aren't for driving on while inflated as you'd have little to no droop.

They have 50mm of lift. Basically have adjustable suspension for max low and doing the suspension job.  These can lift the car temporary so you can get into your driveway/ supermarket carpark etc.

They are very pricey but super simple design, could easily machine up my own.

Just makes a super low car a little bit more practical.

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Does that mean you still get 50mm if extra droop travel when the suspension is aired out? i.e. if you did a jump the shocks will still droop down. Or will the bags keep them tucked up? 

 

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The units I was looking at awhile back had some keeper spring system incorporated into the bag, and were designed to be driven inflated too.

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Pretty sure those were hydraulic - like a ram that moved the mount of the coilover from memory

 

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Yeah they were, my bad.  Just googles it now.  How would they go legality wise?  They seem pretty legit.

 

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11 hours ago, Truenotch said:

Does that mean you still get 50mm if extra droop travel when the suspension is aired out? i.e. if you did a jump the shocks will still droop down. Or will the bags keep them tucked up? 

 

No you'd get no extra droop.  They are a pneumatic ram essentially, when aired out they cant extend and are just a spring perch.

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On ‎27‎/‎07‎/‎2018 at 18:06, AllTorque said:

https://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/exhaust/exhaust-system

see line 5

as long as it cannot enter the passenger compartment, you are fine

The problem is the entire SWB 70 series landcruiser.  Repeated testing with both factory rear exit and side exit exhaust on SWB 70 series landcruier at open road speeds recorded exhaust fume levels in all passenger seating positions sufficient to poison passengers with the side windows open or closed.

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On 7/29/2018 at 22:53, a.craw4d said:

No you'd get no extra droop.  They are a pneumatic ram essentially, when aired out they cant extend and are just a spring perch.

fortune did a little video about them at sema in 2015 

 

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I've searched and can't find this being discussed. 

Can you tell me what the story is with making your own 'bumper bar' or 'bash bar' as some call it. I have a 1991 200sx (non abs and 20+ years old) with no internal front bumper bar (the metal behind plastic/fibreglass bumper). I want to either fit a factory one which might need cutting anyway, or make one out of bent tube to protect the intercooler etc.

The below makes me think its a none issue as long as it isn't designed to impale people (I intend for it to follow the inside contour of the bumper).

In fact it sounds like I don't actually need one?

 

All I can find in LVVTA docs in this:

Bumper bar (removal and change)  the vehicle is not required to comply with a frontal impact occupant protection standard (see Frontal Impact note on page 1). Note: Bumper bar means either the structural part inside a plastic bumper or a complete metal bumper as used on older vehicles.

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