Jump to content

For Questions Regarding WOFs/CERTs/NUMBER PLATEs


si

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, cletus said:

Nope as long as it meets the interior impact requirements you can do what you want if it's just a roll bar. 

 

It would only become more important to check it if it forms part of the structure, like if the upper 4 link bar mounts were incorporated into it, or you mounted your seat belts off the roll bar 

Awesome. Thanks Clint. I assume the same would apply if i was to incorporate the shock tower strengthening hoops into it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 8.2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 1 month later...

Long time lurker in this thread, but I am looking at purchasing a 2005 Lancer Evolution IX Wagon here in Canada, hanging onto it for a while here and then eventually bring it back to NZ with me in a few years time. It's fairly tidy but unfortunately it was auction grade R leaving Japan with a repair to the right rear quarter panel. Looking over the car it looks like the repair was done well and it's not overly obvious, but at the price that it's at (roughly a third of what an equiv one in NZ is listed for right now) I am seriously looking into it because it's one of my bucket list cars.

One question is, when I eventually bring it from Canada to NZ would the prior Japanese auction history be visible to the NZ border despite the car coming via Canada? I would want to tidy up the repair to the point that it's not detectible at all. Another question is, would a 2005 Lancer Evo be eligible to import into the country these days? Being out of the country 11 years now, I'm not even up to date with the import restrictions and regulations. 

 

Thanks all!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If its picked up at the time of vin inspection, budget ~$500(?) For a repair cert, plus the cost of any extra work required to satisfy the repair certifyer that its bedn done right. (Possible strip down etc) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20+yr old by the time you import it or own it for 2 yrs in canada should be sweet

Unless they change all the rules by then.....

/usa has 20yr? rule too so could probably still profit selling it to them

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, fuel said:

Long time lurker in this thread, but I am looking at purchasing a 2005 Lancer Evolution IX Wagon here in Canada, hanging onto it for a while here and then eventually bring it back to NZ with me in a few years time. It's fairly tidy but unfortunately it was auction grade R leaving Japan with a repair to the right rear quarter panel. Looking over the car it looks like the repair was done well and it's not overly obvious, but at the price that it's at (roughly a third of what an equiv one in NZ is listed for right now) I am seriously looking into it because it's one of my bucket list cars.

One question is, when I eventually bring it from Canada to NZ would the prior Japanese auction history be visible to the NZ border despite the car coming via Canada? I would want to tidy up the repair to the point that it's not detectible at all. Another question is, would a 2005 Lancer Evo be eligible to import into the country these days? Being out of the country 11 years now, I'm not even up to date with the import restrictions and regulations. 

 

Thanks all!

I'd say just bring Canada paperwork/proof it's yours and plead ignorance with jdm r grade stuff. 

I don't know/imagine they'd have any access to jdm auction stuff 

/barry out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so looks like getting insurance for a less than 25 year old JDM RHD car is near impossible in Onterrible, so instead I am looking at a '94 Evo II a bit closer to home. Can I register a '94 fine in NZ these days?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Shakotom said:

Restyling a govt issued number plate.

if I do this, and the plate becomes registered in my name (like a pplate) does that mean I can swap it between cars?

 

 

Yes, it becomes a personalised plate, as long as its done through the proper peoples (kiwi plates?)

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, fuel said:

so looks like getting insurance for a less than 25 year old JDM RHD car is near impossible in Onterrible, so instead I am looking at a '94 Evo II a bit closer to home. Can I register a '94 fine in NZ these days?

Seeing the state of the current crop of early Evos coming into the country, id be far more worried about rust and damage than anything.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

you're right about the rust, this Evo II was a total rust bucket. But it has been in Ontario (where they salt the roads in winter) without additional rust protection undercoating for almost 20 years so that would be the reason. It makes my (mostly surface) rusty 2010 VW Passat look pristine in comparison. 

image.thumb.jpeg.d293b009aff84fec105f0305726834ce.jpeg

The 2005 Evo IX wagon doesn't have rust and it's only been in the country (in BC too where they don't salt the roads) for less than a year - it's just the previous rear quarter repair that I am more worried about, also just wanted to make sure I would actually be able to bring it back to NZ in a year or two when the time comes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's over 20 years old- no problem 

Less than 20- has to comply with all emissions standards etc unless you can meet the criteria for a special interest vehicle

Will have to pay the clean car fee though, the car has to be 40+ years old to avoid that 

 

Rust or damage repair will need repair cert regardless of how old it is  

 

 

I'd avoid anything where they salt the roads, I've got a really nice 64 dodge polara on the hoist at the moment, looks good on the outside but it came from new York, and underneath is pretty fucked  

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

great thanks @cletus! I'm wondering maybe I could just hang onto it here in Canada until it's 20 years old. That would be 2025 which isn't too far away. I guess Evo IX wagon would also be classified as a SIV. The Clean car fee would probably be the killer though, but I'm sure that is the price to pay for having one of my wanted cars. If I bring over the C3 and/or RX-7 looks like I would skip the clean car fee there.

How do they determine if a damage repair requires a repair cert? am wondering where they draw the line between regular body damage (like a dent) that has been repaired and painted through to a more serious repair like a quarter panel replacement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sure this has been covered a bazzillion times but Imma go ahead and ask.

Cert for adjustable suspension, bolt in job, oh and wheels not factory also.

Will the certifier be going over the entire car to check other things?  Or is that left for WOF inspections?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, oldrx7 said:

I'm sure this has been covered a bazzillion times but Imma go ahead and ask.

Cert for adjustable suspension, bolt in job, oh and wheels not factory also.

Will the certifier be going over the entire car to check other things?  Or is that left for WOF inspections?

 

 

Provide cert man with wof sheet showing pass on basics and fail for the suspension. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not oldschool but I've never actually seen confirmation on this. 

DC5 Integra / EP3 Civic front shocks.

I know these chassis suffer from serious bumpsteer when lowered, but that shouldn't apply when retaining the stock height.

They have a pickup for the tie rods on the shock itself as seen here. (Not a great pic)
DSC9320-640x964-1.jpg

I've read that this is the issue with aftermarket coilovers. However i'm not sure why, is it to do with materials, angles, both?

A few companies still make shocks & full adjustable coilovers for them, and while I can kinda understand why the usual Taiwanese suspects aren't given a pass, surely a company like Bilstein can be trusted to build something to a standard at least as good as the OEM?  Their offering seen here.

DSC9385-640x964-1.jpg

Would something like Bilstein or KW actually fail to meet the requirements, or is it a matter of everyone wanting cheap & cheerful?

As a side note, Tein, Bilstein & historically others have made OE replacement shocks for these chassis.  Am I correct in assuming that these will pass a legit wof because they are OE level replacements?  And that the issue comes in at cert time due to an LVVTA rule?  Surely something from any of these reputable brands would be better off than the generic £80 replacements I've found out of the UK which I also believe would be perfectly legal here?

I'm looking at picking up a civic and I've noticed that front shocks have been discontinued by Honda so I don't want to find myself in a position where I'm caught out with blown shocks and no real upgrade path.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looking at dialing out some bump steer from my set up, looks like the best was to do so is to go to rose jointed arms.

 

Rather than drilling our the steering arm and using a straight bolt I’m looking to have a new pin made to match the OEM steering arm and taper.

I’m looking through the information sheet https://www.lvvta.org.nz/documents/infosheets/LVVTA_Info_04-2020_Spherical_Bearing_Rod_End_Conversion.pdf

The minimum sizes quoted are larger than the OEM specs I was hoping to replicate I.e. taper is 1/2” vs 16mm-  is there any wriggle room with the diameters quoted in the information sheet?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 22/06/2022 at 11:05, oldrx7 said:

I'm sure this has been covered a bazzillion times but Imma go ahead and ask.

Cert for adjustable suspension, bolt in job, oh and wheels not factory also.

Will the certifier be going over the entire car to check other things?  Or is that left for WOF inspections?

 

 

Wof sheet means certifier doesn't have to check wof items as part of cert so that makes it easier

However it isn't a complete get out of jail free card, it's a common sense thing. I've had cars come in that have had wof check sheets failing it for things like spot lights not working and they have missed major things like rust in the chassis 

Also, for example if the tyres are worn or the brake lights don't work, you would want to get that sorted before you take it for cert, part of the cert is a road test and something like no brake lights could make the road test/brake test hazardous. I've always been careful with making sure the car is good before road testing, because if there's an accident caused by a fault that I've found, but chose to drive the car anyway, I'm pretty sure the insurance company would just laugh at me 

 

 

 

Other thing is a wheel alignment report, the camber shouldn't be more than 1.5deg camber, or .5 degree over max oe spec, whichever is greater. 

 

 

I can't imagine your car would be too bad, having been complied recently it's probably not going to have too many surprises 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...