Jump to content

Romans 2005 Toyota Echo


Roman
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 457
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

1 minute ago, Spencer said:

How many holes have you started drilling in it?

Did any of these come out with non electric windows?

Should shorten all the bolts and make any non load bearing bolts hollow :p

Still got sound deadening?

Lexan? :p

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
14 hours ago, ~Slideways~ said:

I'm not sure if this has come up but what kind of 3d printer do you need to do this sort of thing?

How is durability now?

Do you mean for my manifold, or the other bits? 
I'm still using the same manifold from day 1, so I'll call that a win.
Once I put the carbon on it, it's been fine since then. 
The only real reliability problem is that my throttles are held in my tapping into the plastic material. 
If printing another one I'd make the tapped area much longer so it spreads the load more, or design it so steel threaded inserts can be pressed in from behind.

To print this material (HIPS) you need a printer that can get the nozzle to around 250 degrees, and a heated bed that can go 120ish. Then you need an enclosure to stop drafts (this is probably most important part) 
then it's still a bit of a bastard to print haha. Loves to warp.

Most off the shelf printers cant go that high for nozzle or bed temp, but these are easy-ish upgrades you can buy for not much. 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Roman said:

Do you mean for my manifold, or the other bits? 
I'm still using the same manifold from day 1, so I'll call that a win.
Once I put the carbon on it, it's been fine since then. 
The only real reliability problem is that my throttles are held in my tapping into the plastic material. 
If printing another one I'd make the tapped area much longer so it spreads the load more, or design it so steel threaded inserts can be pressed in from behind.

To print this material (HIPS) you need a printer that can get the nozzle to around 250 degrees, and a heated bed that can go 120ish. Then you need an enclosure to stop drafts (this is probably most important part) 
then it's still a bit of a bastard to print haha. Loves to warp.

Most off the shelf printers cant go that high for nozzle or bed temp, but these are easy-ish upgrades you can buy for not much. 
 

Yep was meaning the manifold itself, it really interests me since I've been looking into ITB's for my MX5 on and off for a while now. Options are either high end expensive CNC stuff or DIY to keep it affordable.

The DIY path has a few options like 20v ITB's with a tig welded flange onto the stock cut down intake manifold. But its a compromise due to port/runner shapes and spacing. The other is using motorbike ITB's with silicon joiners to the cut down manifold but again it's a compromise with either running out of room or having bad flow etc.

Doing something like you've done makes more sense to me, as long as it lasts a decent amount of time.

Plus the option of printing different trumpets etc is pretty cool.

 

What kind of 3d printer do you have? Do you recommend it?

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So in echo related updates, 

Picking up the new wheels from swap meet this weekend, big thanks to @Goat who is bringing them along! 
I also picked up box full of C56 internals including a torsen LSD. Big thanks to my mate Ken for this. LSD will be glorious!
But I have a decision to make. 
The "proper" way to install it is to sit the box on a bench with bellhousing facing down. Then disassemble the box from the far side and remove the gearsets and detents and everything to eventually get to the ring gear and diff center.
But this is like, you've got some food stuck in your teeth but you can only reach it by sticking a broom up your arse. 
There's a bodgey way where you can remove the front cover only, looks fiddly as fuck but saves a big headache (maybe)
So I'll give this method a try on my C152 box first to test the practicality of it.
I hate working on gearboxes so I'm torn between taking the long/proper way, or the potentially short but fiddly way. 
Historically speaking, trying to take any shortcuts usually leads to misery and having to do things the proper way anyway.

Also my alternator situation has been nothing short of a miserable headache that's stopping me from driving the car currently.
It was fine when I first installed the bracket and tensioner, but it would squeak a little bit sometimes. 
Eventually my shitty tensioner broke, so I made a better one with the aim of eliminating the squeak. 
Didnt work, it still sqoke. 
Rechecked belt alignment, fine tuned it to be as exact as I could. 
Pinged belt up tighter. Squeals like a stuck pig. 
Eventually my alternator bracket broke. 
So I got the local workshop to jizz it back up with some welds. 
Then it was fine for a little bit, then started squealing in an incredibly annoying manner and hasnt stopped since. 

I found that the bracket had bent, for I think the same reason it broke initially.
The alternator has a sliding sleeve of sorts that pulls inwards to tighten the alternator to the bracket, where the bolt threads in.
If it's a bit rusty (they all are) it doesnt move too freely, so takes a lot of force to pull it back in. 
I CRCd it a bunch and hammered it in and out to free it up a bit. 
But when you crank the shit out of it to tighten it up, it's trying to crush my bracket before its trying to pull that end bit in. 
Also I think another potential problem is that the original motor has 3 accessories on it. Aircon pump, waterpump, then alternator. 
The belt path means theres maybe 190-200 deg worth of belt wrap on the alternator. 


REPAIR MANUAL ENGINE 1NZ-FE TOYOTA - Car X File


But if you run just from the pulley to the alternator, there's only ~160ish degrees of belt wrap. 
So then you need to tighten the belt heaps to try make up for it - then you have issues with things bending or breaking especially when rpm is high and maybe some harmonics stuff coming into play.
Then the short belt length probably doesnt help either.

So at the moment I'm torn between trying again with another alternator bracket, or just calling it quits on this motor.

Evenutally I need/want to get an NHW20 prius motor so I can run VVTI, bolts to gearbox properly, and then I can use the factory bracket to fit an alternator on. With extra belt wrap and belt length because it's back to a mechanical waterpump.
But I'd like to compare notes to this existing engine first, hopefully get both on a dyno and see how much difference the compression ratio difference makes (or not)

The NHW20 motor is funny because the only thing running off the accessory belt is the waterpump, which then runs on the non V side of the belt. 
So the only thing running on the Vs of the belt is an idler where the alternator usually goes...
But it can definitely fit an alternator there, as the block is the same part number as a normal 1NZ motor. 
Ready to Run OPCIO 1NZFXE 5181749 full engine Toyota Prius (nhw20) 1.5  Cat|ATV Parts & Accessories| - AliExpress
Pretty frustrated at the moment as it's a really unfun sort of problem to deal with, and I dont really have any tools or ability to fix it myself.

 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, ~Slideways~ said:

Yep was meaning the manifold itself, it really interests me since I've been looking into ITB's for my MX5 on and off for a while now. Options are either high end expensive CNC stuff or DIY to keep it affordable.

The DIY path has a few options like 20v ITB's with a tig welded flange onto the stock cut down intake manifold. But its a compromise due to port/runner shapes and spacing. The other is using motorbike ITB's with silicon joiners to the cut down manifold but again it's a compromise with either running out of room or having bad flow etc.

Doing something like you've done makes more sense to me, as long as it lasts a decent amount of time.

Plus the option of printing different trumpets etc is pretty cool.

What kind of 3d printer do you have? Do you recommend it?

Yeah it's definitely a cool thing to have, I have tits for hands when it comes to fabricating things so it's really bridged that gap for me. 
And now I think it's got me thinking more about how I'd actually fabricate something, when it seems intimidating when you dont know how to start otherwise. 

I have a Creality CR10-S S5. 
So it's a 500x500x500 build size but otherwise a pretty cheap and basic printer. 
I wouldnt reccomend how it comes out of the box unless you wanted to print PLA only (material that isnt really usable in hot conditions or for things like manifolds)

To get it to be able to print stuff like HIPS I needed: 

-Change to direct drive extruder
-240v heated bed 
-build a shitty enclosure 
-new controller and firmware that is 32bit instead of 8 bit (It would choke up a bit when there were lots of commands to do quickly)
-solid mount the bed instead of springs

Probably about an extra $4-500 worth of stuff, and shitloads of time calibrating things. 
But now it's an invaluable tool for me.
 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Roman said:

Yeah it's definitely a cool thing to have, I have tits for hands when it comes to fabricating things so it's really bridged that gap for me. 
And now I think it's got me thinking more about how I'd actually fabricate something, when it seems intimidating when you dont know how to start otherwise. 

I have a Creality CR10-S S5. 
So it's a 500x500x500 build size but otherwise a pretty cheap and basic printer. 
I wouldnt reccomend how it comes out of the box unless you wanted to print PLA only (material that isnt really usable in hot conditions or for things like manifolds)

To get it to be able to print stuff like HIPS I needed: 

-Change to direct drive extruder
-240v heated bed 
-build a shitty enclosure 
-new controller and firmware that is 32bit instead of 8 bit (It would choke up a bit when there were lots of commands to do quickly)
-solid mount the bed instead of springs

Probably about an extra $4-500 worth of stuff, and shitloads of time calibrating things. 
But now it's an invaluable tool for me.
 

Ah so that's quite a large one! I was looking at the Ender 3 Pro which says it can do Carbon Fibre (not sure if that's the right thing). But the build size is much smaller at 220x220x250.

From what I can find the nozzle can do 240degC and the base 110degC so maybe just shy of what is needed.

I suppose a manifold could be designed in pieces that slot together?

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah you can do it in bits that slot together. 

240 and 110 deg will likely be fine. Main thing is stopping drafts.
I've not tried printing the carbon nylon stuff because  it's a real ball buster of admin work to keep the matieral ok for printing. 
You have to bake it before your print it to get the moisture out, then it reabsorbs moisture so quickly from the air, that you need to keep it in a dehumidifier box while it prints. 
A smaller printer is considerably considerably easier to work with with way less headaches.

I'd say 70% or 80% of the prints I do are under 250x250
 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re c series gearboxes.  Have pulled many apart. The janky way works fine. Just need to split the case  and have about 10 to 15mm gap to work with to get 2x m8 bolts out that hold the reverse selector thing?  Then will come apart.  Otherwise doing it the proper way,  getting 5th gear off can be a pain. But the later boxes seem to have jacking bolt holes. which makes things not too bad. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Roman said:

Yeah you can do it in bits that slot together. 

240 and 110 deg will likely be fine. Main thing is stopping drafts.
I've not tried printing the carbon nylon stuff because  it's a real ball buster of admin work to keep the matieral ok for printing. 
You have to bake it before your print it to get the moisture out, then it reabsorbs moisture so quickly from the air, that you need to keep it in a dehumidifier box while it prints. 
A smaller printer is considerably considerably easier to work with with way less headaches.

I'd say 70% or 80% of the prints I do are under 250x250
 

Awesome thanks for the info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...