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Hannah and alex's 1966 classic trailer sailor - 6 yearly update... Cobwebs and rum


yoeddynz
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  • 6 years later...
  • yoeddynz changed the title to Hannah and alex's 1966 classic trailer sailor - 6 yearly update... Cobwebs and rum

Stoked to see an update on this! Bilge keelers may not be the fastest boats but clever sailing can still make them competitive, plus you'll always get the best anchorage for the party after the race.

 

My old yacht wasn't a bilge keeler, but it was always satisfying chugging into an anchorage, past all the big boats, and anchoring right next to the sand.

 

The best way to learn to sail is by doing it. You've got the type of mind that will figure out how to trim the sail nicely all on your own by seeing where it's flapping or wrinkling, then looking at the ropes you have available to change the shape of the sail. It's hard to describe to someone when the right moment is to release the sheets during a tack or a gybe, but it's easy to feel when you're doing it.

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I have plenty of  memories of heading out and about on the old mans Tasman 20. He's since replaced it with a Gazelle (originally 24ft but has had a flat extension added off the transom so is actually 26ft). No race machines by any stretch but still fund getting around on them.

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Is a tasman another kiwi made yacht? 

Its quite cool now I'm looking about and learning how many cool different trailer sailer boat designs have come from nz. 

@Samboone of the first things that tim, the fella who's boat we were on told me was to think about the sail being a planes wing standing vertically. Its the low pressure created on the front of it as the air flows across the sail that creates the 'pull'

Up to that point i had always just considered a main sail as something that caught the wind from behind and the wind pushed the boat along. I never considered that it (well a modern sail) was shaped to create the same cross section as a planes wing. 

Sooooo much to learn! But it's fun

Plus as carbydave @sentra told me when here - there's no fucking about worrying about certs and all that like with cars.

 

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Tasman 20 was designed by Alan Wright, who designed my old boat also. You'll see his name attached to an extraordinary number of NZ yachts. Mostly they go by other names (Tasman, Variant, Lotus, Tracker etc), unlike a lot of other NZ designed boats.

 

Very cool that your boat was built with the guys who developed the Nolex design too. That's another Kiwi classic. Apparently Nolexs have been used to circumnavigate. 

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I'd like to find out who actually built it. It's been beautifully put together, very nice joints and finish to all the edges. Its practical but not flamboyant. Hopefully @Carsnz123 or @JustHarry might be able to find out more info because the fella we bought it off was a bit elusive when I asked him about the folder of info he claimed to have.

I'm looking forward to adding a few more bits of hard wood trim and stainless inside to create our own little interior over time. 

 

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9 hours ago, Sambo said:

Tasman 20 was designed by Alan Wright, who designed my old boat also. You'll see his name attached to an extraordinary number of NZ yachts. Mostly they go by other names (Tasman, Variant, Lotus, Tracker etc), unlike a lot of other NZ designed boats.

 

Very cool that your boat was built with the guys who developed the Nolex design too. That's another Kiwi classic. Apparently Nolexs have been used to circumnavigate. 

I did a quick google, which didn't reveal anything, but on the offchance do you know if Alan Wright was also trained an architect? There was an architects firm in the sixties called Warwick & Wright, and Warwick went on to build superyachts, wondering if Wright did too? That'd be amazing. They designed my house.

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Oooh please get into this project really keen to see what you do with it. I grew up sailing little optimists, p classes, starlings and sunbursts. It was a right of passage with a family full of boat builders. Wish I had the time to still be involved in the scene. Such a wholesome way to pass the time and many good people involved. 

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