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For Questions Regarding WOFs/CERTs/NUMBER PLATEs

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On 17/05/2020 at 14:32, hood said:

No rust repairs there Clint, its clean on that side of things

Yes, its getting all sorted at the shop.

Well basically it has a minor dent in the cross member from coming into contact with a tow ball.

Prior to the damage taking place the whole chassis had been cleaned up and painted.

Any further input or similar experiences to share?

Thanks 

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If it was me, if it hasn't had other repairs that would need repair cert, and it hasn't got a whole bunch of fresh underseal and paint etc I'd just send it through compliance and see what they say 

A letter from the panelbeater wouldn't achieve anything, if anything you could pay a repair certifier to write you up something saying it doesnt require it  

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Awesome Clint, thanks for input on the matter.

Fresh paint on the rails, but not on the underside of the cab though 

 

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Lastly Clint, is there anyone in particular who you reccomend i get in contact with?

Or just simply pick someone from NZTA page who covers the BOP region?

Thanks

 

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Sorry I dont have a lot to do with repair cert guys so dont know anyone down that way, probably best to ask your panelbeater if he has one he recommends 

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It appears my Toyota celica ga61 has been changed to class A registration. How do I go about changing it back to normal? 

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Probably a form at the post shop to get that sorted.

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MR1A Application to licence motor vehicle.

Just put 01 in new usage section.

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Yes now that I re read it it doesn't seem vague, in fact it could be interpreted as being incredibly specific. 

What constitutes direct replacement?

Aftermarket shocks?

Aftermarket shocks that are "OEM replacement"? How do you prove that they are? 

OEM shocks?

I mean if you really get specific then only the actual shocks that are removed from the vehicle are direct replacement for those shocks.

I feel that you can clarify all you like, but this is the threshold sheet, it's not up to you. It's up to the wof testers, and they interpret these things in an incredibly broad spectrum. 

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If it bolts in without needing any modifications then it would be a direct replacement?

/technically if you're nit picking, all springs need to be cut and heated by the manufacturer, so that line should really state something along the lines of "replacement springs have not been heated or cut after initial manufacturing"

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But my lifted springs and longer shocks bolt straight in without modification, but I can't get a wof because the tester deemed them to not be direct replacement because they are lifted. 

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1 hour ago, Mof said:

@KKtrips do you have a copy of the previous sheet?

No I don't sorry.

FYI - in this instance, direct replacement means an unmodified catalogued part for the vehicle.
eg: if you fit R32 Skyline springs in an R31 Skyline they may fit but they are not a direct replacement.

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1 hour ago, Mof said:

I feel that you can clarify all you like, but this is the threshold sheet, it's not up to you. It's up to the wof testers, and they interpret these things in an incredibly broad spectrum. 

I get calls about this kind of thing several times a week, a vehicle owner will ring up complaining that a WoF inspector has incorrectly interpreted a requirement telling them they need a cert. 

From the information provided by the vehicle owner

  • we can determine the WoF inspector has correctly interpreted the requirement and I can explain this to the vehicle owner.
  • we can determine the WoF inspector has incorrectly interpreted the requirement and I encourage the vehicle owner to get the inspector to call me and I can explain it to them

When the WoF inspector calls I can explain the requirements to them, sometimes it turns out the information provided by the caller was incorrect or an important detail was missed out of the conversation meaning the WoF inspector was actually correct and I encourage the WoF inspector to then get the vehicle owner to call me back so I can explain it to them if needed.

We have pretty good bullshit detectors here and can get most of the necessary information out of the vehicle owner pretty quickly unless they are intentionally hiding something knowing it will change the answer, a call from the WoF inspector usually clears that up though.

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Just now, KKtrips said:

No I don't sorry.

FYI - in this instance, direct replacement means an unmodified catalogued part for the vehicle.
eg: if you fit R32 Skyline springs in an R31 Skyline they may fit but they are not a direct replacement.

So, if they are catalogued as lift springs for a 1998 Impreza, and are fitted to a 1998 Impreza, and all other thresholds are OK, then they should pass WOF?

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Just now, Nominal said:

So, if they are catalogued as lift springs for a 1998 Impreza, and are fitted to a 1998 Impreza, and all other thresholds are OK, then they should pass WOF?

Yes

edit: for clarity, must be catalogued by a reputable suspension manufacturer, not a list of part numbers on some random spreadsheet on an obscure website.

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I'm surprised the threshold didn't include some sort of limit on lifts in the last update, or specify that replacement shocks should be the same length as oem

 

this wouldn't need a cert according to the threshold if it just had the springs and shocks fitted, and it had a page of stuff wrong with it 

 

 

 

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^yeah that there I understand. If it had OEM arms still in it then they would bind and stop the suspension from operating. And that guy has made his own arms which would then have to be certified (obviously that example ^ is way beyond comprehension).

But if none of the other components of the suspension has been modified or changed... .

 

 

47 minutes ago, KKtrips said:

Yes

edit: for clarity, must be catalogued by a reputable suspension manufacturer, not a list of part numbers on some random spreadsheet on an obscure website.

I'm trying very hard to not come across as an argument, but a conversation if you will. 

So in order to have lift springs in my vehicle I have to produce a catalogue of the springs every time I go for a wof?

How, now or after say 3 years do I prove that the springs fitted are the ones in the catalogue? 

What do I do if the springs were fitted before I bought the vehicle? 

You might at this point say that I should just get it certified, which is a valid point. But, do I need to produce a catalogue for the certifier to check them against? 

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