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Tech Spam thread - because 1/4" BSP gets 5 hand spans to the jiggawatt

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Brake linings?

Try Diggers Brake and Cable 

He might be able to sort you out 

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16 hours ago, mjrstar said:

Open vs close times may differ on a pneumatic solenoid operation due to the volume of the shuttle (unless balanced shuttle). Even then they wouldn't be exaaaacccttly the sane. 

 

It wouldn't surprise me if the times listed are plus minimum open deposit time. More like a design duty of the solenoid rather than something useful to start your calculations fron.

 

That sort of rate may also beat the daylights out of the needle seal and piston.

Also does a change in viscosity effect the actual cycle rate say a thin cold glue could be effectively be easier to apply quickly than a thickish hot glue. 

We use nordson glue gear (at a much slower rate) they seem reasonable, with the odd failure. 

 

Nordson is the most common in NZ, mostly as they have the best service really, just screw you over on pricing, plus everything is imperial

 

and yeah, does change depending on viscosity, but I dont have that info and I trust that whoever helps us set up the machine will set it for best results.

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On 14/11/2019 at 16:42, peteretep said:

there is pressurised glue in line feeding the guns, the times relate to the pneumatically operated solenoids which open the valves for the pressurised glue lines. We can measure everything pretty accurately as the cardboard is moving via servo with encoder feedback. Problem with that is we need to buy a machine to test it, costing $25k

hmmm

even with encoders normal plcs wont actually record the data reliably at that data rate from what I know. although maybe im just used to different plcs that are slower for reasons of systems compatability and reliability. anytime we need to measure stuff in ms its always with a standalone recorder/datalogger thigns like circuit breaker close times, stop valve close times, shaft vibrations/orbits on journal bearings.

talking at speeds like that alot of things could make a difference like the glue as said, even just ambient temps, wear of moving parts etc. I would think you would want to have a fair bit of headroom in the machine speed to account for that if reliability/unattended operation is pretty important. so maybe the listed speed difference between the options isnt really a big deal? chose the one that ticks other boxes best?

also one of them listing a higher speed but will only do that for 100 hours continuous or something where the one thats listed slower max actually will run at the speed for 10,000hours?

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After deciding that i can't really devise a means of making a sparkplug ionization measuring device at home...
Has anyone here used inductance on the coil lead to calculate the delay of firing a coil to the point of the spark occurring?
Bonus points if it's an earth lead on a C.o.P. setup.

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Try LTSpice to simulate, or put a current transformer around the output lead.

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Anybody used water methanol injection for intercooling?  post turbo. 

I've been reading a bit of stuff which suggests it works quite well. 

Have been looking at options on my car.

Have a water to air ic but it's going to add quite a lot of weight and complexity 

Air to air also have but the bodywork covers a lot of the core plus would lose bonnet catch

 

It's not going to be a daily or very often so I dont think the methanol required is going to be a big expense 

 

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I did a lot of research into it a while back. Came across some website of a salt.flat bike racing team. Their.kits were very expensive. But my other research revealed that the "coolingmist" brand stuff was the pic of the affordable stuff. 

There was a guy at datsun 1200.com running a datsun 1000 wagon with an A15 running 30 psi or boost. He ran two hobbs switches. The pump started up at 5psi boost, then a second switch opened the injection nozzle solenoid at 12psi. 

Theres quite an array of different irrigation type nozzles. (More misty, more surface area - more heat absorbed from the charge) but they require decent pressure to work. Pretty sure those cooling mist pumps run around the same pressure as an efi pump. But they're able to be dead headed, and they seals are able to cope with the rigours of methanol too.*

*at least I think it was cooling mist ones that are the ones I'm thinking of

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From running some ghetto methanol suck through turbo things there is no doubt it works amazing, the phase change of the meth draws out shit loads of heat and would make the manifolds cold to touch.

But isn't it just another form of complexity and point of failure similar to the other options? always have to have it full and pumps working, got to keep meth around which doesn't have a long shelf life?. Make the air to air work for simplest option? I'm sure you can work around the body work covering it with some simple ducting and engineer some new bonnet latch setup? /ling

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1 hour ago, cletus said:

Anybody used water methanol injection for intercooling?  post turbo. 

I've been reading a bit of stuff which suggests it works quite well. 

Have been looking at options on my car.

Have a water to air ic but it's going to add quite a lot of weight and complexity 

Air to air also have but the bodywork covers a lot of the core plus would lose bonnet catch

 

It's not going to be a daily or very often so I dont think the methanol required is going to be a big expense 

 

Yes. It was very effective. Especially after the tuner replaced the water with 100% E85. I think there might have been ~10 degree temp drops after the injector.

But, the jets that came with the Aquamist system did not supply a consistent/repeatable amount of E85.

So I replaced it with an inline fuel pump and additional injector and it was retuned. When the E85 injector was running, it reduced the 'normal' fuel at the primary injectors.

It was reliable... for a few weeks/months until I took it to a track day and something failed with the E85 system. Since the ECU had no way to know there was no E85. the fuel mix went REALLY lean and shit melted.

That's my story.

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21 hours ago, Ghostchips said:

After deciding that i can't really devise a means of making a sparkplug ionization measuring device at home...
Has anyone here used inductance on the coil lead to calculate the delay of firing a coil to the point of the spark occurring?
Bonus points if it's an earth lead on a C.o.P. setup.

I have done this with an oscilloscope on a few occasions

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Yeah as adoom says once you are using the aclohol as a coolant you cannot help but also using it as a fuel source so you have to tune your whole setup for the "coolant" then if you have a failure you go lean. So the cooling system has to be treated as an secondary fuel system which can never fail. Seems what you may save in perceived simplicity you gain a whole new stack of risk as you are reliant on another active fuel system to be working correctly at all times. Giz passive cooling from air any day on a street car.

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I did a quick google, and that motorbike page said 170cc per minute per 300hp.

Based on your ET's, (plus the inevitable wick turning up in future) youd be looking at around the 500hp mark. 

So.thats 283cc per minute. A three litre tank would give you ten minutes of WOT. 

 

And looking at their.website, cooling mist do a.pump rated to 300psi. 

That motorbike page hates on the shurflo/flojet pumps. 

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This is how much of the intercooler gets covered, ends up with 2 x 150x150 squares in the air flow  

20191120_211100.jpg

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And oh so simple, no pump failure and melty engine. Can you run something wider? In the pic it seems so?

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