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For Questions Regarding WOFs/CERTs/NUMBER PLATEs


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On 09/02/2021 at 17:27, KKtrips said:

Minimum of 40mm suspension droop (unless some really lightweight thing like a Lotus 7 replica)

Spacer requirements start from page 17 - https://lvvta.org.nz/documents/standards/LVVTA_STD_Wheels_&_Tyres.pdf

Spacer requirements for all wheels
2.5(1) A wheel spacer fitted to a low volume vehicle between the wheel and hub assembly, other than that fitted as original equipment by a high volume vehicle manufacturer, must:
(a)be purposed-designed for automotive applications, and either be manufactured by a recognised automotive wheel spacer manufacturer, or be manufactured by a person who is recognised by an LVV Certifier as:
       (i) being competent and experienced in the type of work being undertaken; and
       (ii) having the necessary equipment to carry out the manufacturing process correctly; and
(b) have a maximum spacing of each wheel away from the hub surface of 20 mm; and
(c) be manufactured from a solid block of suitable material; and
(d) have two machined or die-cast surfaces that are parallel, and contain minimal indentations or irregularities; and
(e) be fitted as to ensure the wheel locates snugly over the hub spigot so that the hub carries the weight of the wheel assembly instead of the wheel studs, or where there is a mis-match between the hub spigot and the wheel centre, a close tolerance fit center bore locator must be provided; and
(f) be set-screwed or attached by another secure method to either the wheel or hub face; and
(g) maintain, with the spacer fitted, not less than the minimum required amount of wheel stud or bolt engagement; (see below) and
(h) not be fitted in conjunction with another wheel spacer or wheel adaptor.

Additional spacer requirements for cast aluminium wheels
2.5(2) A wheel spacer fitted to a low volume vehicle with cast aluminium wheels, or any other wheels that incorporate a full hub contact surface area, in addition to meeting 2.5(1), may incorporate additional holes within the spacer for multi-fitting purposes, provided that:
(a) the spacer is designed to fit only one stud configuration; and
(b) there is sufficient material provided between the multi-fit holes in order to resist deformation of the spacer.

Additional spacer requirements for pressed steel wheels
2.5(3) A wheel spacer fitted to a low volume vehicle with pressed steel wheels, or any other wheels which incorporate a minimal hub contact surface area, in addition to meeting 2.5(1), must not incorporate any additional holes within the spacer other than those used to:
(a) where the design of the hub assembly allows,locate the centre hub spigot to the wheel, which must be a close tolerance fit; and
(b) attach the spacers to the hub face or wheel rim; and
(c) enable the wheel studs being used to attach the wheel to pass through, which must match the stud pattern of the vehicle

NOTE: ‘Configuration’ means, within the context of 2.5(2)(a), that whilst a spacer can be of a multi-fitting design in that it fits varying pitch circle diameters, it must be of a type that will fit either a four-stud wheel ora five-stud wheel, but not both. Spacers that will fit both four-stud andfive-stud wheels must not be used in any situations.

Wheel stud or bolt engagement
2.4(4)  A wheel stud or bolt attaching a wheel to a low volume vehicle must engage into or through the corresponding nut or hub assembly by either:
(a) not less than the diameter of the stud thread; or
(b)  a specified number of full turns of thread engagement, which must be not less than:
    (i) in the case of a 12 mm metric stud or bolt with a 1.5 mm coarse thread pitch, 6.5 turns; or
    (ii) in the case of a 12 mm metric stud or bolt with a 1.25 mm fine thread pitch, 7.5 turns; or
    (iii) in the case of a 14 mm metric stud or bolt with a 1.5 mm coarse thread pitch, 7.5 turns; or
    (iv) in the case of a 7/16 inch, 1/2 inch, or 3/8 inchimperial stud or bolt, 7.5 turns; or
(c) in the case of an unmodified hub assembly,not less than that originally provided for the fitment by the original vehicle manufacturer.
 

I got asked about adaptors vs spacers the other day, so thought I would post the bit about adaptors here so they are both together

Wheel adaptor design and manufacture
2.5(4) A wheel adaptor fitted to a low volume vehicle between the hub and wheel assembly to affect a change in the wheel stud pattern or pitch circle diameter, must:
(a)be purpose-designed for automotive applications, manufactured by a recognised automotive wheel adaptor manufacturer or be manufactured by a person who is recognised by an LVV Certifier as:
    (i)being competent and experienced in the type of work being undertaken; and
    (ii)having the necessary equipment to carry out the manufacturing process correctly;and
(b)be manufactured from a single block of suitable material; and
(c)be of a thickness that,
    (i)unless the hub assembly donor vehicle is substantially heavier than the vehicle to which the adaptors are fitted, provides a maximum spacing of each wheel away from the hub surface of 30 mm; and
    (ii)does not exceed the maximum allowable amount of offset specified in 2.2(8)when the wheel adaptor thickness is included within the wheel offset.

Wheel adaptor location
2.5(5) A wheel adaptor fitted to a low volume vehicle between the hub and wheel assembly to affect a change in the wheel stud pattern, must locate with a close tolerance fit using the centre spigot or tapered wheel nuts or bolts:
(a)the adaptor against the hub assembly; and
(b)the wheel assembly against the adaptor.

Wheel adaptor attachment
2.5(6) A wheel adaptor fitted to a low volume vehicle between the hub and wheel assembly to affect a change in the wheel stud pattern, must attach:
(a)with no interference between any fastenings attaching the wheel to the adaptor, or adaptor to the hub assembly; and
(b)using wheel nuts, studs, or bolts for both the attachment of the adaptor to the hub assembly, and the wheel to the adaptor, that:
   (i)are a correct match for the type of wheel stud or bolt hole; and
   (ii)are of a type purpose-designed for automotive use; and
   (iii)are of a suitable size and pitch circle diameter to carry the loads imposed under normal vehicle operation; and
   (iv)incorporate not less than the minimum required amount of wheel stud or bolt thread engagement specified in 2.4(4).

2.5(7) A wheel adaptor must not be fitted to a low volume vehicle in conjunction with a wheel spacer or another wheel adaptor

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School me please.

Say a car is bought into NZ and regoed as for instance, 289 V8 power. On inspection of build plate it was a 6 cyld poverty pack with front disks optioned. Obviously it was repowered before entry but what do we know about springs, other driveline components (swaybar sizes, diff and rear brake sizing) being uprated to V8 specs. Should this be picked up on entry check?  Should the car require a cert as driveline doesn't match decoded data plate?  Does the owner just run with it?

Thanks in advance, the Muppet

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Technically yes should be certified, and the inspector should pick that up. 

But in practice,  many American cars dont get picked up for things like that  because they have no, or difficult to decipher, body tags and option codes, and a lot of the time all that v8 stuff and brakes and suspension has been in the car for years so it looks factory 

I get it quite often where someone has done a minor mod to a car and bought it in for cert, only to find it needs cert for heaps of other stuff that wasn't picked up for compliance 

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In the final stages of getting dad's ta63 notch finished. 

The driveshaft we have for it is slightly too short, can I turn up a spacer (with locating spigots). Or will this fail a wof? 

I need to go eyeball it and see if the spacer is going to be too thick or not, but thought I'd better check on the legality first 

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When using aftermarket coilovers, is it acceptable to substitute parts out for custom parts so long as they are at least as strong as parts they replace? Think locking nut at bottom of threaded tube. Supplied is quite short. I want to get some fabricated that are longer with the same locking design at the top. So basically threaded tube below the nut that is the same diameter as the shock body. But all one piece, machined out of the same material of original locking nut. 

Reason for this is due to going large wheels, the locking nut is too close to wheel. Moving it up also moves it inboard due to strut angle, thus gaining clearance.

TIA

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Hey @cletus I have a little bit of tyre rub. I have rolled the lip up out of the way but the inner metal skin sticks out and rubbing the tyre a little. What are the thoughts on flattening out the bulge with a big hammer to gain some clearance?

IMG_20210309_202849.jpg

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Have done exactly that on my own car, so yeah I think that will be fine  

Lots of little whacks, take your time and make sure you dont go too far and dent the outside skin 

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20 minutes ago, cletus said:

Have done exactly that on my own car, so yeah I think that will be fine  

Lots of little whacks, take your time and make sure you dont go too far and dent the outside skin 

Cheers man I really appreciate your knowledge

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On 08/03/2021 at 12:49, Bling said:

When using aftermarket coilovers, is it acceptable to substitute parts out for custom parts so long as they are at least as strong as parts they replace? Think locking nut at bottom of threaded tube. Supplied is quite short. I want to get some fabricated that are longer with the same locking design at the top. So basically threaded tube below the nut that is the same diameter as the shock body. But all one piece, machined out of the same material of original locking nut. 

Reason for this is due to going large wheels, the locking nut is too close to wheel. Moving it up also moves it inboard due to strut angle, thus gaining clearance.

TIA

I think that would be fine, your certifier will probably want some sort of proof that the material you have made them from is suitable, that could be a receipt from the engineer who made them  

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I’m looking to swap out the bench front seat in my Cortina with a pair of GT Cortina bucket seats. The issue being that they only mount at the front and the rear slides to give forward/back adjustment- you can set the vinyl patches under the rear in the pic where the rear slides.

The front seat mounts have a stopper built in so they can’t flip forward.

My read is that I might have issues getting these certified as the way they mount wouldn’t really give the same level of strength as a modern production vehicle? 2.8(2) 

BA8FF62B-9F71-4375-B5C7-7A0776D0A65A.png

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Booked in for cert on some coilovers in Christchurch this week, wanting to check I have everything prepared, and if I'm missing any info he will need.

Alignment was done this week and has been setup within OE tolerances, have the alignment sheet for the certifier. 

Access to the strut tops in the rear is behind the seat back. Currently I have the rear seats out as I'm still setting up the damper adjustment/fine tuning the ride- will leaving these out for cert make his job easier, or does he need to see the car fully assembled? 

Thank you

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Tried to search but nothing came up in the first couple pages.

Repair certs vs "Getting a panel beater report for repairs"/wait 28 days, fix it yourself, then go for a recheck.

What's the flags in the WOF system for noting which stuff requires an actual structural repair cert? How does a regular person know if it's something that will require an actual repair panel beater vs something that can be done themselves (Like for a piece of surface rust that is larger than 3cm etc)

 

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Repair cert= for unregistered vehicles or ones that have been written off 

 

If the vehicle is registered, then it wont need a repair cert to pass wof  

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