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Nathan's motorcycles.....


flyingbrick
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Yup technology is amazing. 

Tonight I assembled a basic watt meter/load with voltage switch thing so that I can test battery capacities accurately. Its all just cheap shit from ali express but seems to work OK. 

You connect a fully charged battery and press the button on the side, this engages the resistors to give a 30 watt load, and then when voltage gets down to 12.1 it disconnects the load and holds capacity information on the screen. During discharge it also displays load in Watts and battery voltage. Quite neat. 

The old busa battery drops from 13v to 12.3 very quickly,and in total outputs just 0.4Ah before it disengages the load at 12.1v

I know that I'd get more out of the battery if there was a smaller load (manufacturers test Ah over a ten hour draw down or something) but it should still be a lot better than what I got. 

Not quite brave enough to connect and test the new battery though, LOL. 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

So just an FYI for anyone who cares to follow along

The Old busa battery is now up to 4.5Ah of capacity when doing the discharge test at 4watts down to a cut off voltage of 12.1v. Thats obviously a huge increase from the originally tested .4Ah and has taken around a week and about 2 minutes every night to switch alligator clips around. I *THINK* that optimum capacity would be around 6Ah if doing this test on the battery when new, but I really do not know what voltage the factory tests down to when specifying capacities. Regardless- If i hadn't bought a new battery this one would be totally usable now- Thankfully it will have a good home in my lawn mower :-D 

To make the battery more usable I've been running an AliExpress desulphator circuit on it- Basically, it feeds the battery a high voltage pulse (From 0v to around 22v I think). The High voltage pushes energy through the sulphate crystals and knocks them off the lead plates- the pulse stops the battery from overheating as actual amps in is very low. Theres people on YT saying you don't need to bother with that and they jam on some high voltage DC and carefully monitor amps and temperature- but thats too much admin for me- the pulse circuit is simply set and forget.

Routine: 

  1. connect pulse circuit to battery for 24hrs.
  2. run capacity test for 24 hrs (I just check it each night, no idea how long its sitting idle for once it finishes)
  3. repeat steps 1 and 2 until capacity stops increasing.

In  my case the first capacity test was .4Ah, then 1.5Ah, then 3Ah, then 4.4Ah, then 4.5Ah, so its obviously as good as its going to get, time to move on to the next one.

 

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Pulled off fairing and old sprockets. They were both pretty worn on one face each. Surprising because the rear axle was perfectly aligned with its notches.

I asked a mate with a busa(he has a couple including a bking and a turbo busa drag bike) , he uses a laser thing to align his bike and tells me all of the marks on these bikes are wrong from the factory. 

I Google it and he's right. Apparently there's quite a few different models of bike with shit house marks. 

I managed to find some decent info about how many race teams align their rear wheels then gave a basic drawing to @Kimjon. Within a few days that bloody brilliant chap had machined up the bits for me. I skid them onto half a flounder spear shaft and boom, foolproof and extremely accurate alignments every time.

The cone ends center themselves into the swingarm pivot and the rear axle, you just lock the tool and compare one sides measurement to the other side. IMG20210813171836_copy_723x1600.thumb.jpg.0941d4c093beb4a9fa7b47fd78b6b492.jpgIMG20210813171909_copy_723x1600.thumb.jpg.bc306b6435854ff5b35166b4786673c7.jpg

And on Tuesday I sent off the ecu to the same bloke who gave alignment advice. He flashed the ecu for me and put a sticker on it. 

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These computers are pretty advanced and have nearly as much tuneability and functionality as a modern link. It adjusts 8 injectors with maps for each of the four cylinders, fuel and timing depending on which gear you are in, which power level you have selected (basically three different sets of maps which you can flick between on the fly to change power levels or whatever else you want to change maps for). 

Its also completely tunable with just a basic cable and some software (which isn't that expensive). 

But cheaper than that is just having him to do it. He has a very popular set of safe maps that make it a bit smoother, a little more powerful, more free revving etc plus turns on fans at a slightly lower temp. These bikes are so popular around the world that there's a pretty comprehensive recipe to get them running their best. 

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