flyingbrick

Arduino stuff/ programing/so cheap

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and i think you can also run that visual micro in atmel studio from what i've read? never tried... atmel studio is the proper way to program a micro, but you can compile arduino in there as well with the add on and is based on visual studio as well

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Thats amazing Ned.

 

I watched that video the other day (as well as a shit tonne of others...well before deciding to buy an arduino) and I thought it was cool but didnt view it as achievable (both from a coding and price standpoint)...now i know differently.

 

Anyway.. spent 30 minutes in that simulator and used an android dictionary app thing to help... managed to get a button working with two LED's which alternated on button press at one of them flashes... Pretty exciting to have something that works.

 

I did get a shit tonne of errors which were driving me batshit crazy- the usual issue with capitals and all that. Having a simulator is invaluable (i havent used any actual arduino software, no idea if it has fault finding stuff)

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hey downtrail, does that work good enough that you wouldnt bother connecting directly to the selector rods? ive ummed and arred over doing what youve done for years, good work.

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I made this pultrusion thing the other day and got it running today:
 

Has Arduinos to control the puller, die temperature and resin temperature. Also has live datalogging/plotting using GNU Octave.

I'll refine the breadboard circuit onto a single board and throw it into a housing soon, was just trying to get the bastard running in the first place. Second arduino is down by the resin heater stuff in the box with the dials.

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Turning rovings into rod, allows for process modification experiments on a small scale. The big machines downstairs make everything from small rod up to 300x300 I beams.
 

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3 hours ago, sentra said:

hey downtrail, does that work good enough that you wouldnt bother connecting directly to the selector rods? ive ummed and arred over doing what youve done for years, good work.

Thought about doing something like that but never really came up with a clean way of getting the cylinders into the gearbox without some major modifications. If it was a cable shifter for a fwd by all means hook straight onto the the cables or gearbox but for this box think itll be easiest to run it how it is. 

 

Hardest thing is consistancy ive got a bunch of magnetic sensors to go onto the cylinders so the software knows what gear it is actually in so it can react to a missed gear or wrong gear type of thing.

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25 minutes ago, flyingbrick said:

Edit.. is that making rod from glass string and resin?

I'll describe the process a bit here, but I can't give too much information due to non-disclosure agreements.

Basically you have rovings of fibre glass (a bundle of unidirectional strands, in this case approximately 4.4 kg/km worth or 1.73 mm^2 per roving). These rovings get passed through a resin bath and coated with the resin (in this case a mix of polyurethane/styrene and various fillers and catalysts). After the resin bath they are passed through a heated die, which is kept at a constant temperature. The resin cures within the die and the part comes out the other side in a hardened condition (kind of rubbery when it is still hot though as it usually exits the die above its glass transition temperature). When the part is out of the die, it cools somewhat and is then pulled using (in this case) rollers and then coiled up or cut to length.

The benefit of using a small machine like this is it allows for very quick changes of resin and glass types, without interfering with the main production line and doesn't reduce the factory's throughput. Before making this machine I would have to wait for a break between jobs at the factory before I could get onto a machine for a day in order to run the experiments. Now I can just run them whenever I want for as long as I want.

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On 7/4/2017 at 20:17, flyingbrick said:

I haven't tried this stuff earlier for two reasons- lack of useful projects and the idea that they were too spendy and bulky to be used for permanent (set and forget) type projects. It feels foreign to me that you could have this programmable computer hidden away for the sole task of (for example without thinking too much about it) dimming your interior lamp and flashing your indicators...but then for $5 why can't it just do those things?

I basically just want mine to display dash indicator symbols; handbrake, headlights, indicators, alternator etc which should be bloody easy (hard for me but an achievable goal)

I thought this initially too, but you can get Arduino copies cheap as chips from Ali Express, like just a few dollars and they do the job just as good as the original.

It's also possible, once you have tested your project with Arduino and breadboard to then copy the code over to a smaller chip which can be run standalone in a project which frees up the Arduino for use on other projects. I bought a few of these chips but I can't remember the part number right now. If you're interested, let me know and I'll find out the details.

The programming part is also pretty simple if you've done C/C++ before as it's pretty identical from what I've seen, so that shouldn't be a problem.

Just my 2c as I have a couple of Arduino's and I've played around with them a bit, but I've not really used it for anything, in particular lol.

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48 minutes ago, Scrubb said:

I thought this initially too, but you can get Arduino copies cheap as chips from Ali Express, like just a few dollars and they do the job just as good as the original.

It's also possible, once you have tested your project with Arduino and breadboard to then copy the code over to a smaller chip which can be run standalone in a project which frees up the Arduino for use on other projects. I bought a few of these chips but I can't remember the part number right now. If you're interested, let me know and I'll find out the details.

The programming part is also pretty simple if you've done C/C++ before as it's pretty identical from what I've seen, so that shouldn't be a problem.

Just my 2c as I have a couple of Arduino's and I've played around with them a bit, but I've not really used it for anything, in particular lol.

Hi mate.

Yeah I bought a couple of these

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Nano-CH340-ATmega328P-MicroUSB-Compatible-for-Arduino-Nano-V3-0/32740641316.html?spm=2114.13010608.0.0.f8qGLh

I'll have one on the desk for testing etc and one that will be used in the vehicle.

Can't wait for the mailman!

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Neither can the Mrs puukuu 

I got a arduino starter kit ages ago. Dies anyone have recommendations on learning how to code? I want to make some displays with my nixies at some point. 

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1 hour ago, chris r said:

Neither can the Mrs puukuu 

I got a arduino starter kit ages ago. Dies anyone have recommendations on learning how to code? I want to make some displays with my nixies at some point. 

Have you had a look at this guy? He seems to know what he's doing

 

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Heaps of YouTube available for sure. Also Chris go to tinkercad site and play with Arduino circuit simulator and do tutorials with it.. bloody good way of learning

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I am intending on using the 74141 driver chips. They need have 4x inputs high or low 5v to display the required number. Most nixie clock kits using arduino or found don't use said chips 

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because you can use the arduino to convert BCD to decimal (converts binary to decimal) and then send it to one of those HV5812 nixie tube drivers, which are daisy chain-able serial to parallel chips as well so can control as many nixie tubes as you like with 3 or 4 arduino pins

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Just had my little color OLED turn up. I admit it's a bit smaller than I kinda imagined (even though full measurements are given haha) 

I may get a second but will see how the TFT looks first.. I think OLEDs are better in this application maybe.

20170711_091223.jpg

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I also have absolutely no programming experience but I'm keen to give this a crack too.

has anyone had a play with getting their phone talking to an arduino via Bluetooth?

ive got this thing in my driveway:

(it's a turntable but I can't get photos working)

which needs some mechanical repairs at the mo, but once it's fixed I'd like to automate it. Currently you have to get out of the car and flick a switch on the fence to turn it on.

I'd want to sit in the car and hit a start button in an ap on my phone and then hit the stop button when ready.

I see it as no more complicated than making an LED go but via Bluetooth haha

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