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4 minutes ago, gibbon said:

Should I wet sand my high build primer? Worried the top coat won't stick if it's too smooth 

Your top coat will say what grit it wants to be sprayed over on its TDS

 

you can wet or dry sand. Most high build primers say not to get them wet, but i dont think it really matters as long as the car isnt sitting outside for months before being painted.

 

if you sand it dry, then use dry sand paper (wet and dry will clog up faster)

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Yes if you want it to be smooth. It will stick all the way to like 600/800 is the norm I think, don't think I have ever used over 400/600. It would stick well enough even if you just scuffed with scotch brite and painted.

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theres some major barry arguments about dry sanding vs wet sanding if you google this question.

my advice is dont think too hard about it, just get the grit in the general zone, and once you have finished sanding - go over it all again

 

 

(naturally a reminder that im not a car painter, i just paint cars some times)

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400 for solids, 600 for metallics. Don't use a scotch pad to "sand" anything. I only use a scotch pad when I do blends into other panels, but only after iv'e gone over the blend panel with 1200.

400 wet is closer to 500 dry. I used to do everything 'wet' but now use a Festool dry sander and haven't looked back.  

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Thanks for the replies guys, I'm just starting with a single door as a test. 2k white is on and looks to have come out ok, a bit of dust though. My "complete car paint job kit" didnt come with clearcoat, is clearcoating a personal choice too? 

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2k doesn't* need a clear coat

 

* But the clear is sometimes needed for UV protection.

 

You have single stage Paint (just the colour coat)

And base + clear 

Presumably your white is a single

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Yip just a single stage. Our machines at work are just painted in a top coat and look pretty good, i just figured itd be hardly any more effort to clear coat it now... now or never really 

Still I'm always down for less work 8-)

So what's next then, 1500 wet sand and a polish? 

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  • 2 weeks later...

if it needs it.

 

if lots of orange peel/fluff in the surface - id start at maybe 1000 and work up to 2000, then buffing compound, then finishing compund

 

the G3 buffing stuff i have claims to be same as 2000 grit, but it comes out nicer sanding it to 2000 first

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22 hours ago, tortron said:

if it needs it.

Oh yeah it needs it lol 

Next question - painting rubbery plasticy bumpers, should I add some kind of plasticizer to the paint? Old paint was cracked to buggery 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Appropriate techniques and tricks for panel&paint in confined workshops?

Looking to attack the rust and panelwork on the Datsun this winter, minor but needs attention stuff, sill, bottoms of gaurds etc, only catch is I don't have a massive workshop, one bay for the car and half for workbench etc. Painting the full car is not really possible inside as I don't want overspray everywhere, but I could make space for a door at a time.

Is there any best way to go about the job? Thinking one panel at a time to be able to refit and check lines, hoping this comes with the added bonus of not having too much space taken up for storage for long periods?

Once all panels are straight and primed, set up a temporary spray booth in the car port/driveway to finish the topcoat?

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Winter is tough, I had to wait for warm weather to do most of my painting as I didn't want to paint inside / also have very limited space. Most of my stuff I did a panel at a time, and epoxy primed it. Then waited till it was warm enough to do the filler primer / top coat. If you're wanting to do the topcoat, then a decent heater should sort that. I had plastic surrounding the car at one point, suspended from the roof. This kept all the grinder dust enclosed. Could do similar for painting panels. 

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