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Nerd help needed on router issues


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Hi, sick of trawling google not getting straight answers and many of you clever chaps will know!

I have started with some basic home automation stuff,  google home hubs, wifi lights, chromecasts, heatpump controllers, wifi outlets etc etc, everything works fine and dandy.
Anything that supports 5ghz network or lan cable is done so, freeing up the space on the 2.4ghz network which many things (all the lights) are on.

It seems i've hit the max number of devices connected before one gets randomly booted off to replace another at about 22 
The Lan cable and 5ghz are never booted, so i'm assuming its a maximum just on 2.4ghz band

Can i plug another router into my current router expanding my max number of connected devices? or does that second router use up device slots in the primary router? by slots do i mean IP addresses? I have no idea. 

I have no issues with signal or strength anywhere>
 

If anyone lurking in the shadows has any idea how to help Id appreciate a cheeky PM, thanks team :)

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i cant help too much, but i threw that fucking huawei router into the dump, lobbed it for distance even. i dunno if its a QC thing, but mine was the worst electrical thing ive ever delt with, replaced it with a reasonably flash TP Link item and haven't had an issue since. 

except with our vodafone tv which wasnt router related but they couldnt remote into it and snoop around, the overseas help desk guy got upset when i said i threw the router in the dump and asked if i could go retrieve it.... 

as i think hand was alluding to, hopefully your issues are fixed with a better quality router. 

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You have two things going on here. One is WiFi connectivity and the other is the router. To make things confusing the Huawei and most other home based devices combine both in to the same box. One or the other is likely the issue. Those Huawei things aren't great and 22 devices going through the router part of it is doing bloody well IMO (everything be it cabled or wifi will go through the router part) as i usually see them shit them selves at anything 10+, though home automation devices don't send much traffic. On the other side of that i doubt a Huawei box would support 22 devices on WiFi so you must have a number cabled.

I would suggest replacing the Huawei unit with something better in the first instance. PBTech probably have a good idea if you go in and see them and give them an idea of what you are doing. Be prepared to spend $500+ on a decent router that can handle though. From there you want to look at WiFi coverage if things keep dropping off. Possibly look at the Google WiFi setups to get both a good router and better WiFi coverage in one.

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5 hours ago, mark105 said:

Those Huawei things aren't great and 22 devices going through the router part of it is doing bloody well IMO (everything be it cabled or wifi will go through the router part) as i usually see them shit them selves at anything 10+, though home automation devices don't send much traffic. On the other side of that i doubt a Huawei box would support 22 devices on WiFi so you must have a number cabled.

Sounds like I'm lucky as is. 

10 lights, 2 Chromecasts (older 2.4only models) Ac controller, 2 switches, dehumidifier and air purifier on the 2.4ghz band, so 17 devices

The other 5 are cabled computers or 5ghz casting devices.

What I want to know is:  If I plug another router into the current one, can I put say 8 of those devices listed above on the new router, halfing the load on the original router? 
or is there some sort of bottleneck. I had an inkling at it being down to how devices are assigned Ip's

I set static IPs for the things I didnt want to drop off, but for some reason I can only set a max number of those at 8.

I've never had network performance issues, its always there, works solid and never drops out, just a whole device will disappear and it takes a router reset to jumble ip's up again and its assigned a new one

 

5 hours ago, mark105 said:

I would suggest replacing the Huawei unit with something better in the first instance. Be prepared to spend $500+ on a decent router that can handle though. 

Pretty much what I'm trying to avoid :lol: But if everyone agrees its necessary Ill bite the bullet
 
 

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2 hours ago, Prof Schnorz said:

 

I set static IPs for the things I didnt want to drop off, but for some reason I can only set a max number of those at 8.

I've never had network performance issues, its always there, works solid and never drops out, just a whole device will disappear and it takes a router reset to jumble ip's up again and its assigned a new one

 

Are you setting up static IP's from the router or on the individual devices?  If you do it on each individual device, you would be limited to over 200, not 8.  It would also prevent router from resetting those ip's if it gets reset.

 

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1 hour ago, spiderwebfx said:

Are you setting up static IP's from the router or on the individual devices?  If you do it on each individual device, you would be limited to over 200, not 8.  It would also prevent router from resetting those ip's if it gets reset.

 

Dude, this is what I need. I thought it could be completely done from the router side. Thanks mate

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1 hour ago, spiderwebfx said:

Are you setting up static IP's from the router or on the individual devices?  If you do it on each individual device, you would be limited to over 200, not 8.  It would also prevent router from resetting those ip's if it gets reset.

 

Dude, this is what I need. I thought it could be completely done from the router side. Thanks mate

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No problem, it's much easier to do from each individual items side and far more reliable as well.   This is what we do to all of our mobile phones, laptop and wireless printer in our workshop.  All up, we're at about 15 different items on WiFi.  We do have a non-provider issued modem (Draytek) though as we run a VPN also, so this does allow us to have more devices connected whilst still maintain performance.

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On 11/06/2019 at 21:26, Prof Schnorz said:

 

Dude, this is what I need. I thought it could be completely done from the router side. Thanks mate

This can be done from the router side by setting up reservations in your router settings. You need to know the MAC address of the device and the IP address you want to give it. Most routers allow you to set reservations.

This way you can have your devices set to automatically get an IP from your router, and they'll always get the same one. You also don't have to manually configure each device.

 

You can usually also change your DHCP settings in the router to give out more dynamic IP addresses too, if you need more addresses

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On 14/06/2019 at 08:40, Scrubb said:

This can be done from the router side by setting up reservations in your router settings. You need to know the MAC address of the device and the IP address you want to give it. Most routers allow you to set reservations.

This way you can have your devices set to automatically get an IP from your router, and they'll always get the same one. You also don't have to manually configure each device.

 

You can usually also change your DHCP settings in the router to give out more dynamic IP addresses too, if you need more addresses

Yes, I've done all that but limited to only reserving 8.

For some strange reason it isn't working for me anyway, they're being assigned new Ips no matter what reservation I'm setting for them.


so far, the whole system has been working flawlessly and the only thing I have done is set the lease times to max (I think it was one week)
 

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Is 22 devices on a WiFi router heaps? I just thought it related back to the amount of addresses it could give out in total? So 255 would be max? I’m not a computer expert at all but that’s what I figured. I have had problems logging onto WiFi at some sites recently and I thought they had run out of addresses, but maybe that isn’t the case? Also, would an industrial network system have the same issues?

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You can set the ip range to a large number but the router will have a limit on how many ip's it can manually assign. I just checked mine and I have a range from .1 to .199 but can only manually assign a max of 64 ip's within that.

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