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Shane's Evo IV RS Track Build


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nice,

When I was running 17x8 38p on my evo 4 I found that anything more than a 225 semi slick caused rubbage in the rear, athough I had only a minor guard lip roll.

 

I will be interested in how the AR1's perform, i have recently splashed out on a set of new NT01's for my hillclimb civic - it was a toss up between them NT01 and AR1.

 

on the turbo side, I ran a evo 9 based TD06sl2-20g and retained the factory exhaust manifold and evo 7+ dump pipe, then into a 3 inch exhaust. this spooled really well with the kelford 264's and still idled nicely, Also I reckon evo 8 wheels are a good look on these things, here is a pic of my old one on the E8 wheels.

 

as you may already know the brembo swap is super easy - i definately recommend upgrading the master cylinder at the same time to a 17/16 unit from and evo 5 + (or mitsi GTO they are the same), plus you will need to trim the dust shields to clear the bigger discs.

Pic of my old Evo. 

http://iforce.co.nz/View.aspx?i=2t3nvk0u.5lv.jpg

 

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12 hours ago, mjrstar said:

nice,

When I was running 17x8 38p on my evo 4 I found that anything more than a 225 semi slick caused rubbage in the rear, athough I had only a minor guard lip roll.

 

I will be interested in how the AR1's perform, i have recently splashed out on a set of new NT01's for my hillclimb civic - it was a toss up between them NT01 and AR1.

 

on the turbo side, I ran a evo 9 based TD06sl2-20g and retained the factory exhaust manifold and evo 7+ dump pipe, then into a 3 inch exhaust. this spooled really well with the kelford 264's and still idled nicely, Also I reckon evo 8 wheels are a good look on these things, here is a pic of my old one on the E8 wheels.

 

as you may already know the brembo swap is super easy - i definately recommend upgrading the master cylinder at the same time to a 17/16 unit from and evo 5 + (or mitsi GTO they are the same), plus you will need to trim the dust shields to clear the bigger discs.

Pic of my old Evo. 

http://iforce.co.nz/View.aspx?i=2t3nvk0u.5lv.jpg

 

My friends back in Perth swear by the AR1s, and I've found a  a couple threads like THIS ONE which show the AR1s to outperform NT01s considerably. Of note in that thread is his comment about balancing wheels, have had that argument with every tyre shop that's ever mounted semi slicks for me :D Pity we're not in Aus too, as AR1s are 30-40% cheaper than in NZ...

For the turbo, I'll be running the standard turbo off my old Evo VII for a bit of nostalgia, and because it was free +shipping (the new owner was kind enough to post it over to me - was in a tub of spares I gave him with the sale). The part number tells me it's some random mix of an Evo 6.5 and Evo 7 RS turbo, who knows. Anyway, I'm hoping I can screw enough boost into the engine to make 300-320hp at the wheels without ventilating the block too soon. If it does go pop, good chance to build a 4G64-based 2.4L :) For cams, I absolutely love the lumpy 272 idle, would probably choose them over 264s even if they performed worse lol

Thanks for the master cylinder info, I'll check that out. Dust shields will be removed entirely to aid with cooling, brake fade and pad life was a major issue for me on my old VII (even with 2" cooling ducts)

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9 hours ago, shane22 said:

My friends back in Perth swear by the AR1s, and I've found a  a couple threads like THIS ONE which show the AR1s to outperform NT01s considerably. Of note in that thread is his comment about balancing wheels, have had that argument with every tyre shop that's ever mounted semi slicks for me :D Pity we're not in Aus too, as AR1s are 30-40% cheaper than in NZ...

Yeah read that thread about AR1 pity they used a wider tyre in the comparison.

I have not had tyres move considerably on the rim, with match marking to confirm, maybe too much lube or big radius on the bead seat area? 

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Over the last few days I've built a string alignment rig and played around with the wheel alignment, was a lot of iterations to get it in the ballpark!

The point of the string alignment rig is to set toe front and rear. I chose to build a rig attached to the car (like the Smart Strings system, but a boatload cheaper) as opposed to just setting up strings on axle stands so that I can jack up the car, remove wheels and make adjustments without affecting the placement of the strings, which take quite a long time to set up accurately. This was mostly put together from scraps I had lying around the garage, I had to spend maybe $60 on the aluminium tubes and some fasteners.

Each frame has adjustment in x, y and z directions, allowing me to set up the strings parallel and level, as well as centred to the car. The aluminium bars have notches cut into them where the strings are tied to them, ensuring the distance between strings at each end is exactly the same. I also marked the strings at a certain length, so that both sides are the same length, creating a fairly accurate rectangle around the car.

The front frame is bolted to where the upper radiator mounts attach to captive nuts in the core support, and the rear frame is clamped through some conveniently-placed holes in the boot.

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The basic alignment process went as follows:

1. Jack the car up on to some impromptu wheel stands (I used the original Evo IV wheels as I couldn't be bothered building stands).

2. Ensure the tyres won't bind when you make adjustments. To do this, I bought a $14 pack of vinyl self-adhesive tiles from Bunnings. Under each wheel I have two tiles (with the vinyl faces in the middle). With some soapy water sprayed between the tiles, the tyres have very little friction when making adjustments. Need to be careful that the floor is level though, otherwise the car tends to want to slide off the stands :)

3. Set camber front and rear. I have a Longacre camber/caster gauge attached to a small piece of MDF with stand-off bolts for doing this, but there are plenty of options for measuring the camber angle (small digital level etc). On the front end, I adjusted the coilover top hats until I got to where I wanted (-3.5 degrees). On the rear, I adjusted the lower control arm's eccentric bolt until I hit -2.0 degrees.

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4. Set up the string rig so I can measure toe. To set this up accurately, first I need to ensure the strings and aluminium frames form a rectangle, so I make sure the distance between strings at each end is the same, and the length of each string is the same. Second, I play around with the rig's Z-axis adjustment to get the strings pretty much in the centre of each wheel. Third, I put a level on each aluminium tube to make sure the rectangle is flat and not twisted. Lastly, I play around with the rig's X-axis adjustment so that the distance between the wheel hub and the string is the same on both sides (front measurements need to be the same, rear measurements need to be the same, front and rear don't need to be the same as the track width may not be consistent front and rear). This means the string rectangle's centreline is aligned with the vehicle's centreline.

5. Set front toe. To measure toe, it's simply a case of measuring from the string to the front lip of the wheel, then measuring from the string to the rear lip of the wheel. If the rear lip measurement is longer than the front lip measurement, you have toe out. If the rear lip measurement is shorter than the front lip measurement, you have toe in. I wanted 1.0mm of total toe out (0.5mm per wheel), so I adjusted the tie rods until I had it near enough. Unfortunately I didn't have a way of locking my steering wheel in the dead-centre position, so everything wandered a bit and I had to iterate quite a few times to get the toe right across both sides. My steering wheel is a bit off-centre, but I'm not super bothered. I'll fix it up next time I align the car.

6. Set rear toe. Measuring the toe is the same as the front, but adjustment is made through an eccentric bolt in the one of the control arms. 

7. Completely forget to take any photos of measuring toe :cry:

8. Check everything one more time. This is when I discovered that adjusting rear toe had quite a large effect on rear camber, so I iterated a few more times with adjusting rear camber and toe until everything was in spec.

9. Make sure all bolts are tight and wheel nuts torqued. Disassemble the string rig, drop the car off the stands and go for a test drive. Set up the string rig again and double-check all measurements after the test drive, hoping that nothing has moved too much :)

 

 

I took the car up the Port Hills for a good fang, really happy with how it feels. Very similar to my old Evo VII (not surprising considering it's exactly the same suspension), drives like a big go-kart. The springs are fairly heavy (9kg front and rear) so it's super planted through corners, but the damping is very well tuned so bumps get eaten up and surprisingly it's actually more comfortable than stock suspension on the terrible Chch roads. 

Even after rolling the rear guards as much as I could, the rear tyres are rubbing where the rear guard meets the rear bumper when the outside wheel hits a bump mid-corner. I've already relocated the bumper mounting bolt away from this area and tried to bash down the metal tab, so I think I'll go nuts on rear camber (out to -2.5 or -2.75), and get the hacksaw and hammer out to really have a crack at the small metal nub that's rubbing.

 

That's about it for the next couple months, going to be very busy with work, a couple weddings, and Dad is coming to visit for the Skope Classic. When I eventually get some spare time, I'll get stuck in to the Brembo brake conversion and hopefully get out for a track day or two

 

Cheers,

Shane

 

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14 minutes ago, to4garret said:

Hahaha there is a bit of gingerbeering in that rig Shane!

Good to see you working on another project back home, i miss how much better turbo cars go in the cooler climate.

Haha I was close to modelling it all in SolidWorks but it really wasn’t necessary :-D

I’m just happy it’s not 45 degrees in the garage! Perth summers are the worst lol

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