johnny.race

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About johnny.race

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  1. johnny.race

    Diffs

    Yep. He's holding the big end in a divider by the brake register. He's doing light cuts because he's got no support behind the axle and the color of his chips say so. He'll be ever so careful when he's doing his test fits with a side gear with the tailstock removed ... all that axle sticking out unsupported. He'll chock it up using that big hunk of iron sitting in the middle there. Its almost if i am there, aye?! Lol! I love seeing the different setups and are reasonably versed in the challenges of the task in hand. He won't be turning down the bearing journal OD if that core is from an AU. They are the same size as Valiant used already/in stock form. He maybe attempting to alter the brake offset distance? Thinning the inside hub shoulder down? Ummm ... the brake register hub diameter would be bigger on the Ford too? Good stuff. Keep us posted.
  2. johnny.race

    Diffs

    Nice bro. How many passes? Must be several because those chips are not electric blue like my ones come off like. Whereabouts is the old man grabbing the axle with the indexer? At the end or along the shaft somewhere? Cool to see this kinda stuff.
  3. johnny.race

    Diffs

    The bigger drums had the fins from what I can see and yeah - I am saying 2.5 for 2.5. I don't know for sure but it makes sense to me ... or why would Ford make them any bigger than they absolutely had to. Go well. You must be running two different stud patterns aye matey.
  4. johnny.race

    Diffs

    On those things ... by pulling an axle. It'll be either a ball or a tapered roller. If its a tapered roller it'll be a Timken SET20 and you'll be the owner of a late model big bearing Torino style housing. If its a ball bearing style and it measures 3.150"/80mm then it will also be big bearing but the early style. Ifs its a ball bearing but smaller than 80mm in diameter, then it'll be a small bearing type. Pull an axle man. See what spline you have got at the same time. You can't go off the old 1/2" or 3/8" rule anymore ... I've seen tapers come out of holes where there should have been a ball. They obviously knew what they were doing because they had removed the seal too. Just saying.
  5. johnny.race

    Diffs

    Get your shoes relined (if they are the correct ones that suit your drums etc) I'm not really familiar with OEM 9" drum setups but I'd be guessing the guide thingy you are talking about would be the same in most of the other 9" drum offerings. They'd be side dependent though. Each side would mirror the other so you need to get the side you are after. The 9" came with 3 different brake offsets as well as several different shoe widths. You'l be able to see straight away if the drums don't match the backing plates. The drums have that receiver groove thing going on with the backing plate. Furthermore, if the shoes look obscenely skinny compared to the drum then someones probably swapped them in at sometime during the past. You beable to see the wear pattern in the drum. They are designed to be all used' - if that makes sense. There are 3 different bearing sizes and 2 different types. What have you got? Each of the 2 types have their own way of controlling oil leakage. If Hypoid (it is oil and not fluid, yeah?) then regardless of the bearing type - it all needs changing out. In one case the bearing contains the primary oil seal so must be changed as a unit and in the other - its seal has failed so allowing oil ingression that will lead to shitting your bearing (its supposed to be sealed) The main oil seal for this type will be located inside the axle housing. The seal in/on the bearing is the last resort and is there to protect the bearing. Chur.
  6. johnny.race

    Diffs

    Mate, you won't be making a collapsible spacer at home me thinks. If you are going to be making anything - it will be a solid spacer. You read about guys saying they made one blah blah and seemingly like its an easy 5 min job on a lathe. Its not. It involves some very tight tolerances being kept, some decent measuring equipment and the hardest thing .... a source for obtaining shims. On top top of this is the design of the diff ... if its a Banjo or a Salisbury has massive implications from an ergonomic POV if you are R&D'ing a homebuilt solid spacer setup. Can you buy a collapsible or solid spacer kit for an early Holden diff? . Whats an EH diff - Banjo or ? The Aussies must have something.
  7. johnny.race

    Diffs

    I dunno, I have never seen/worked on an EH diff but will offer up this little observation. I pulled apart a BW from out of a XY Falcon a few months ago and discovered it had a solid spacer fitted. I'm pretty sure it was factory and that I was the first one to pull it apart. So yeah ... there was a fair bit of solid spacery' going on in them days. Pay to check before paying a pro to do what can be done at home with a rattle gun. Just saying.
  8. Anyone tried one of these? Your thoughts for a penny? https://www.trademe.co.nz/business-farming-industry/industrial/manufacturing-metalwork/welders/listing-2366469798.htm?rsqid=7d5a324775f1446382b36a0b5f29f447-002
  9. johnny.race

    Diffs

    So I take it that 28 spline axles were got (probably from the same diff the carrier came from) and then cut down and resplined in order to replace the 25 spline items? I'm trying to follow what has been done. Question ... did you end up using the brakes that came with the 28 spline axles?
  10. johnny.race

    Diffs

    You can tell if it came out of an AU or not. The bearing retainer plate changed on the AU when compared to the earlier models. The AU housing flange is wayyy thicker than the earlier models and its bolt pattern is more of a square' as opposed to the earlier models rectangular shape. Different brakes also.
  11. Do you still have these? I have had 4 of these for around 9 years now. I remember balking at the cost of them back then. I am sure I paid something like a couple of hundy a pair or something. Maybe that was for all 4 of them, I can't remember. I dunno, but I knew they were expensive at the time. I've always thought they were pretty beefy and robust. I've never had problems with them. I wonder if they have changed the gauge of plate they are using? If you still have yours would you put a pair of verniers over them in order to determine the material thickness they are made from. I will do mine.
  12. johnny.race

    Diffs

    Any diff that has equal length axles will not have the pinion centered within said diffs width. Most jap utes (I have not seen all of them but am talking about Luxers and Couriers et.al) have equal length axles. For instance the pinion offset of a OEM Lux is over an inch. This surprises people at times when they have lined up the pinion with the gearbox and then proceeded to weld stuff in/on then find they can run stagger if they want to. Then on the other side of the tree you have diffs like the BW78 which has the pinion more or less centered within it width. This is achieved by having a longer drivers side axle than what is found on the passenger side. Factory 9 inchers are like this also. Funny old world. Carrying this on and adding to what @cletus was saying about his A body (a Valiant) having some offset. He is talking about engine offset. You need to be aware of and factor this into diff swaps to if you are aligning tailshafts with pinions. Especially on those MoPars. Ahh, thank god for string lines and plumb bobs.
  13. johnny.race

    Diffs

    My understanding is that the 8.8 is/was the factory's replacement option for applications they would have used a 9 inch if they were still making them. A 9 inch equipped to the same spec as the Explorer diff would be a pricey beast indeed. I'm a 9 inch owner but fuck ... one of those 8.8's in the flesh is a big arse beasty of a diff. Hey Clint ... you must be running some 'up there' pinion offset by running 2 axles the same length?
  14. That knurl diameter on the new item looks smaller than the one that came out. Yes, no? Its my experience that while enlarging wheel stud holes might be easy to do as you put it, getting them spot on is a little harder. The true test that the PCD has been re-done correctly can usually first be determined by how well a decent fitting set of shank style lug nuts are screws on when fitting a mag rim. Just saying.