Hurmeez

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Hurmeez last won the day on June 28 2017

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  1. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    And that wouldn't solve the hub centric problem either. I figure if I need to machine up a ring to match the hub spigot to the wheel, I might as well make a whole spacer up for that extra hella mad sick stance as well.
  2. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Interesting. I'll be down in Auckland for the first week of the new year so I might have to go to a wreckers and have a bit of a look. No Focuses in the one down the road unfortunately.
  3. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    I got my axles back from the machinist for an unbelievably good price so I can start getting them set up to go back into the diff. I made a start by pressing the brand new bearings on. A handy thing about the skyline axles is they have identical bearing faces to the Falcon axles I got rid of out of my housing. So two brand new Falcon bearings later and I have a fully together diff and a rolling chassis once more. Next, I threw my mockup brake setup on. I quickly noticed a problem when I went to bolt the wheel on. The caliper actually sticks out further than the wheel mounting face. I'm not exactly sure how the Mondeo wheel looks, but I'm getting the idea that it must have a bit of offset with a mounting face the same diameter as the brake disk. The Cheviot Turbos that I have have a mounting face that is bigger than the brake disk face, so it doesn't sit down properly. My best solution for this is a 10mm wheel spacer. I made a mockup out of MDF to test my hypothesis. According to the Hobby Car bible, this would meet almost all the requirements of a wheel spacer. It also has the bonus effect of making the wheel hub-centric, because the turbos have a larger center hole than the standard Escort sized hub spigot and are do not transfer the load to it on a normal English diff. The only thing I'm not sure of is the requirement for the spacer to "be set-screwed or attached by another secure mechanical method to either the wheel or hub face." Does the fact that it is clamped by the wheel nuts not cover this? Or would I have to drill and tap countersunk screws into the mounting face of the wheel to ensure they are compliant? In any case, I threw the mockup spacer on to check fitments. Here you can see that it provides a mounting face with sufficient clearance to the caliper. And the hub centric support: In the final version, I would probably make the center a blind hole that sits snugly over the axle spigot for extra support. And finally, the wheels fill out the arch much better in my opinion with just that 10mm extra track width per side. And with the center caps on, you'd never know the difference. While typing all this, I had the thought that Mondeo front disks may have a different offset between the braking face and wheel mounting face which may solve this whole thing. It wouldn't solve the hub concentricity issues though. I think I'll still go to the wreckers and have a look but I'm open to suggestions. Cheers.
  4. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    I wasn't completely happy with using bolts with each mounting flange being tapped to hold each throttle body on. Not least because all my untamed strength acting on the quarter inch ratchet managed to strip one of the alloy tapped holes on the first try. So I decided to swap the whole lot for steel studs pressed in from the back side of the flanges. So, two minutes of turning later... You get these delightful little fellows: And then pressed into place. Which gives me a much more professional looking nut rather than bolt with a neat little button head on the back. While I was in there I also added an extra throttle return spring. I'm much happier with the throttle now. I wasn't quite returning to its seat after lifting from light throttle but now it snaps shut far more satisfactorily. Next job is at the other end of the car...
  5. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    So with the idle circuit sorted, I figured after working on getting a little bit of air into the engine, the next logical step is to figure out getting lots of air in as well. I'm not sure if I've mentioned it before but I plan to use the original BMW linkage rods to actuate each TB. They are stainless from factory and hard as a coffin nail, so I'd really like to avoid machining or drilling them as much as I possibly can. Because I basically can't. So I won't. I actually considered this way back when I designed the intake flanges, spacing them out the same as they would have been on the V10 in the first place. This meant that all the cross drilled holes in the link rods already line up with the throttle bodies and I can use the factory linkages and everything is peachy. Also, being originally off a V10, the rods were too long for the banks of three per side that I'm using. This left me with a handy little overhang on which to mount a custom eccentric throttle wheel. So with the help of @yoeddynz once again, and a little bit of maths, I designed this: Using the standard Escort's pedal throw of ~46mm, it gives you a little over 1/3 (7/18ths) throttle opening at half total pedal throw and the remaining 2/3rds ish with the remaining travel. Hopefully this strikes a good balance between fine controllability and spongy pedal feel, like you get in so many modern fly by wire setups. Unfortunately I won't be able to know for sure for a very long time, but, such is life. Using that neat little drawing, I spun this up in the lathe with the four jaw chuck. Probably the most offset job I've ever done. Thought the bloody thing was gonna jump out at me any second when it hit its resonance. Here it is mounted on the link rod: With that done, the next thing was to make a bracket to hold the throttle cable. I'm using a standard Escort throttle cable shortened by about 150mm and with a late model style barrel end on it. This lets me use a standard pedal and clip and not have to worry about modifying anything on that end of the deal. Here is what I came up with for the bracket: It is made from 2mm sheet to match the original bracket. This means the clip system on the end of the throttle cable fits in snugly. As you can see it is mounted to the idle circuit tubing. And here it is in place: And full throttle: Finally, I had to connect each bank together. I ordered some rose joint rod ends from china with a left-hand female thread, and repurposed a right-handed example from my original twin carb setup for the Pinto from way back. Then I modified a pair of the factory linkages to be parallel at half throttle but with one above the rod and one below, while still picking up the original holes in the link rods. This should mean that each rod should rotate at the same rate but in opposite directions for the entire arc. Finally, each rose joint is connected by a stainless steel rod with opposite threads on each end to allow for fine adjustment of length and to balance each bank properly. I also made up a couple of lock nuts for each end. So finally, this is how it all looks in action from the driver's seat: With that all done, while I was in there, I installed the proper vacuum rated flexi hose for the idle circuit. Looks flash as now. Not sure what the next job will be but I'm sure it will end up on here at some point. Cheers.
  6. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Man I almost missed the engine jamming out too hard to those sick beats! I wonder if Kelford would be able to regrind the standard cams to an even more aggressive profile? I'm glad I bought the DE engine first now so I can swap in the reportedly superior valve train components.
  7. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Interesting how he was saying that it has a 7k redline. For some reason I had it in my head that it was more like 8 but I'm not sure where I got that from...
  8. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Also that video is awesome! Didn't think I'd watch the whole thing on data but next thing I know the whole things gone by. It sounds heavenly up in the revs!
  9. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    You know, I knew all of that already but I never put the fact that you could wrap the throttle cable around the pulley as much as you like and it's still only going to pull it through 90 degrees if you've got the radius of the wheel right. The fact that yours was wrapped almost half way round was really messing with my head. Thanks for explaining it so well.
  10. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Each bit you do is one bit less at the end of the day. She'll be sweet when she's done!
  11. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Awesome! I'm gonna be off it for a year while I'm on a course in Auckland so progress will come to a screeching halt for me.
  12. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    You'll definitely have yours done before me so it'll be interesting to see what you find.
  13. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    It's a shame they didn't make them for the superior cylinder arrangement really! Would have made my life a little easier. I'll have to send a strongly worded letter to Berlin next time the pony express comes through.
  14. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    Moving to the Throttle bodies, I decided I'd start with the idle air control circuit. Originally I planned to drill and tap some brass fittings into each intake runner and join them all with push on vacuum line to a central ICV somewhere hidden away. That would then require me to plug the BMW injector ports (I'm going to use the standard Mazda V6 injectors) since they are on the vacuum side of the butterflies and would pose a significant vacuum leak. Then I had an idea. Well @d.p.n.s had an idea and it was pretty smart so I thought I'd take the credit. If the BMW injector ports are going to create a significant vacuum leak, then why not use it to control the idle? Dan got lucky with a set of throttle bodies that already had a ICV setup on them and all he had to do was cut and shut it to fit. Unfortunately, for whatever reason, the V10 style of throttle bodies (Which I am using) don't have one built in. So I'd make my own using the unused ports. I started by machining up some "false injectors" out of mild steel. I considered stainless for the bling factor but the extra pain in the butt I'd have with the machining made me reject that idea. As you can see, they use the standard O-rings and are shaped essentially identically other than the long injector nozzle. Here they are in place: Then I crossdresseddrilled each one and ground them out to shape to fit a common balance tube. Which they were all then welded to. I put a cheeky little cap on the front of each one at a jaunty angle to make them look a bit faster. Next was a couple of little brackets to hold each new false fuel rail using two of the throttle body mounting bolts. So now I have two separate balanced banks of throttle bodies. Next I need to connect each side together to balance the whole lot together and hook the whole lot up to an idle air control valve of some description. Again, Dan's throttle bodies came with their original IACV but mine didn't. So I did a little research and found that there are an awful lot of BMW engines that use the same model of IACV, including a couple of six cylinders that were down at the local wreckers. So $30 later I was back with a nicely gummed up and seized valve. A bit of brake clean soon had it cleaned up and freed and I started looking at options for hooking it into the system. The first thing I did was try a random brand new filter I found in the empire of dirt. What do you know? It fits over the intake perfectly! Magic! Then I wrapped it in a strip of sound insulating sticky backed foam which you can see above. This is a little too thick for the final fit but I carved it up to fit for now. Then I found a random ignition coil mounting strap and again, it fits perfectly! A study in serendipity this is turning out to be! With the mounting sorted, I continued by machining a few different fittings to assemble into this T-piece, among others. I intentionally made all these custom pieces the same dimensions as the output side of the valve to keep all the hose runs easy and not have to worry about diameter changes along the way. That then gets welded onto the passenger side false fuel rail. (I suppose balance tube is a better name actually) With everything bolted up, you can see the short run for a piece of vacuum rated tube to connect the valve to the balance tube. I also welded a fitting to the other balance tube to connect them up. I intentionally made this one the same length as the T-piece to give me the option of welding another tube on underneath for a brake booster vacuum source later on if I decide I want one. Finally, I connected everything up with a piece of hose I had lying around. I don't think it is vacuum rated at all, (it's pretty easy to squash by hand) but it looks good for now and I've got some proper silicone hose on order from the parts shop in town. I'm going to start on my eccentric throttle wheel next but I'm struggling to figure out the maths behind the radius, versus center offset and so on and so forth. At the moment my thinking is that a throttle butterfly only opens by 90 degrees or a quarter turn, give or take, from closed to full throttle. Therefore, if I find the full travel distance of my cable and multiply by 4, that should give me the circumference of the wheel. Then I was going to decide on how far to offset the centers by looking at pictures online, but of the ones I've been able to find, none of them seem to have the cable pulling the wheel through 90 degrees. Most look more like 120 degrees and I mean, @yoeddynz's one on the old Viva looks like it wants to pull through almost 180 degrees and that doesn't make a lot of sense to me. If anyone can help me out with any advice in this case then I'm all ears. Please share any ideas or advice here: Also I just realised, I never properly showcased the finished intake runners with their flash professional welds. Hopefully these photos do enough to show off how pretty they are.
  15. Hurmeez

    Hurmeez' 1977 Mk2 Escort Estate

    The next job was to get the diff mounts sorted. I found some suitable box section and carved it up into something resembling a diff mount. I copied the original Escort pads in pretty much every way to make sure they'd fit the standard springs nicely. Then I welded up the original holes in the shock plate/spring mount and redrilled them further apart to take the bigger Falcon U-bolts. I bought a new set of springs for it a while ago because I thought mine looked pretty shagged. They were making a W shape rather than a U when there was any weight in the back of the car. So I threw them in and it bolted up, set all my angles, and jacked from the centre section to see what ride height I'd get from the new springs. Just to prevent any confusion, that is the car sitting on bump stops. With no weight to speak of in it. With my new springs. Yayy. So I had another look at my original springs. It turns out they'd been subjected to the ole' flipped leaf, hence their W shape. So I disassembled them and put them back together in the right order and swapped them back in to find that they gave me a ridiculous monster truck ride. So I swapped the centre leaf of the original spring for the two centre ones out of the new set and tried it again. That finally sorted it out. I didn't actually get any photos but I think it's something like a two-inch drop from stock. It did come with a whole new set of problems though. Measuring the angle on the gearbox output shaft gave me an angle of 8.5 degrees down. So I set the angle on the input shaft to 8.5 degrees up at ride height to make sure the drive angles were equal and I'd avoid any vibrations etc in the U joints. Then I measured the angle of the driveshaft itself and got 2.5 degrees. This means the U joint angles would come to a total of 6 degrees. Now everywhere I've looked online says that 10 degrees is the absolute maximum you want to run on a driveshaft U joint but anything less than 5 degrees is far more ideal. Now I wasn't completely happy but I was willing to just run it with the 6 and hope for the best but there was one other thing that meant I forced myself to do something about it. With the engine at its current angle, I was going to have a clearance issue between the front passenger side throttle linkage and the bonnet. I worked out that if I were to raise the gearbox cross-member by ~50mm, it'd put the driveshaft angle down to something closer to 4 degrees, as well as getting ~10mm of clearance for the throttle linkage at its closest point. The only other option would be to drop the engine down. But I've already go it as low as possible with the standard cross member and any more and I'd have to start modifying the steering rack mounts and suspension geometry and that's a huge can of worms that I have absolutely no intention of opening. So next job was to make a riser for the transmission tunnel. As per, I started with a CAD template, Then steel, Welded in my original boot mounting ring, Tacked it, And welded it. I reckon with a custom centre console and a standard looking vinyl shift boot, I can cover the whole thing and still have it looking fairly standard. Finally I made a new gear box cross member to lift it up into its new home. I'm much happier with this one. Here you can see just how far I've raised everything by the difference in cross members. Still no rear axles though so I can't fully and finally sort out the diff mounts and rear brakes yet. That's it for now. I'm planning on working on the throttle linkage and pedal setup next.