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Adoom's 1972 Triumph 2000


Adoom
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  • 2 weeks later...
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I had some areas of bare metal where I had made repairs or modifications. They kept getting minor surface rust, so I thought I should really get around to painting them with epoxy.

The prep around the firewall was awful. All the seam sealer was bituminous tar stuff. So there was many hours of heat gun and scraping and rags soaked in kerosene and manual wire brushes to remove it. Then I needed to remove the paint because there were areas with surface rust and others where rust was creeping under the paint. So that was more many hours of knotted wire brush on the grinder. And the 3M abrasive pad thing on the grinder. And chemical paint stripper on the larger flattish areas and more scraping. Then there are lots of narrow spaces and gaps and corners I can't get into with the grinder. I found some reasonably priced little wire brushes at mytools.co.nz that were rated to use in a die grinder at 20000rpm without exploding. I also used small abrasive pads in the die grinder.

Then I dusted it off with the air gun and wiped it all down with a cloth soaked in prepsol. And dried it off with the heat gun.

And brush painted it with protec 408 epoxy primer. The engine bay has had two coats, the repair in the boot has only had one.

I have some modern seam sealer to use. Hopefully it hasn't all gone hard... I think I might have bought it a couple of years ago.

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So I've been fighting for clearance for the steering off the rear stud for the exhaust manifold.

I first tried replacing the stud with a bolt so it was lower profile.

I still had negative clearance.

The universal joint has a bolt that goes right through with a nylock nut which sticks out a fair bit. I looked at my starlet, and there is no nut, one side of the hole is threaded so you just use a bolt. I decided to replicate this method. I drilled and tapped it to the next size up UNF thread(I didn't want to mix and metric and imperial in the same assembly). But now the U-groove in the end of the steering column was slightly too small for the bolt to slide through. So stripped down the column and put it in the lathe. Fuck all needed to come off, it's now just the right size to thread the bolt in by hand. I painted it and regreased the bearings too.

That got me down to zero clearance... you can turn the wheel, but the corners of the bolt heads just clip.

Time to get drastic...er.

Move the lower mount of the steering column over.

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To avoid making a mess of the panel behind, I used the flap disk until it was wafer thin then peeled it off. This intact lower mount is from the rusty car. I also kept part of the panel from the other car to use as a cutting template, and later I'll make a filler piece from it. 

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It only needed to move a little bit, less than 10mm.

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Using a set of drill bits to measure the gap, the closest it gets is 9.5mm.

The intermediate shaft now touches the chassis rail. When the engine is out again I'll make some room there.

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I started looking at the Triumph wiring loom to work out how I will connect the Link ECU loom to it.

Lucas, the prince of darkness apparently did not believe in fuses or relays. There are 3 fuses and a relay for the horn, that's all.

I've found some dodgy repairs to the instrument wiring. And someone had put in a relay for the headlights, but it's really old and gigantic, I had assumed it was an external voltage regulator before investigating. A section of loom has also been lengthened, with different colour wires... I haven't worked out why.

To sort out the dodgy repairs I've had to unwrap the whole loom to decipher the how and why, so since I've gone that far I may as well modernise it a bit and put in a new, larger fuse box and some relays to take the current load off the old switches.

The OEM wiring for the Oil and Brake warning light is LOL. (The brake warning is if the front/rear circuit fails.)The lights are wired in series for power, but each has its own earth through their sensors.

There is a description of how they work in the factory service manual...

  1. Ignition ON engine not running: Oil light "ON FAINTLY", Brake light "ON FAINTLY" (apparently so you can check the bulbs work)
  2. Engine running: Oil light "OFF", Brake light "OFF" (Yep)
  3. Engine running brake circuit failure: Oil light "OFF", Brake light "ON BRIGHT" (Cool, makes sense)
  4. Engine running low oil pressure: Oil light "ON FAINTLY", Brake light "ON FAINTLY" (Ummmm. What!? I know they are "faint" because they are in series, but surely there was a better way to do this.)

It does literally say "FAINTLY", which in real life is probably so dim you can't tell it's on, because Lucas.

However, I've got a oil pressure sender for the ECU, so the oil warning light will be controlled by the ECU.

I am undecided if I will retain the brake warning light, as far as I can tell many models didn't have it. I also had trouble finding a wiring diagram that included the light and sensor. Some diagrams listed the light and sensor as items 51 and 52 but they were missing from the actual circuit diagram?! I eventually found it in the factory service manual under "Left hand drive models only"...??? If I decide to keep it I have loads of spare inputs/outputs on the ECU, so I could connect the sensor to the ECU and get it to control the light as well.

 

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Pieced together the radiator pipes. SO. MANY. CLAMPS! It was actually slightly cheaper this way than buying some random rubber pipes with the right bends and cutting them up.

It was still far more than I was expecting.

I have cranked the clamps up as tight as I can but I still have leaks when the engine warms up. A bunch of leaks. :(

It seems to be sealing okay at the engine and radiator connections. I'm thinking that since the joints where it is leaking are almost never going to need taking apart, I'll squirt some silicone sealer between the pipe and hose, then put the clamps on again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Finally at the back again. Made cross member MK2. Used some 1.6mm steel for the sides, 2mm for the top. The vertical metal bandsaw is right up there in the favourite tool list, it makes cutting this stuff up a piece of cake.

Zip zap welded it together.

Blurry photos.

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I really hope I worked the heights out correctly. This should give me ~70mm bump and droop from ride height. 

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