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Guypie's Bike Build - It's done!


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Nice build very inspiring 

If you can’t tweak your brake mounts to perfection then decent bike shops have disc brake mount facing tools and shouldn’t charge a lot to do it - I have bent the rear disc caliper mount on my steel dh bike a few times and just tweaked it back into alignment 

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2 hours ago, Shakotom said:

Yeah am thinking about it if I find a cheap enough donor bike 

Once lockdown is over you can bring it down and we can tig it up and go for a full rigid spin up Pirongia.

 

1 hour ago, Transom said:

Nice build very inspiring 

If you can’t tweak your brake mounts to perfection then decent bike shops have disc brake mount facing tools and shouldn’t charge a lot to do it - I have bent the rear disc caliper mount on my steel dh bike a few times and just tweaked it back into alignment 

Thats good to know! 

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So this is about when lockdown happened. I was contemplating buying cable guides/ braze ons or whatever, but never got around to it and now I have plenty of time on my hands and no cable guides. So I had a look at the general design of the cable tie type hose guides and tried to to think of how I could make something like that using the lathe and not much else.

I started off by making a spool/cotton reel shape with a 5mm hole through the centre like this:

20210820_103017.thumb.jpg.42d9ff2737730b42aa9c1802833c8b8d.jpg

and then filed a mitre into the rim with a round file:

20210820_103022.thumb.jpg.85da3b6770c08152c0fbf9635ff43e6a.jpg

20210820_103033.thumb.jpg.cd6f4904b74d07b9da8cc3004a0d8d74.jpg

And then cut out with grinder or hacksaw. I found grinder made for less cleanup work afterwards

20210820_103815.thumb.jpg.1124e9152bed72e6ea21a807f5bad140.jpg

First and second guides in place:

20210820_114653.thumb.jpg.d5882642086c45993c401f9cb22665e2.jpg

These 2 are a little on the low side and will probably end up with the paint underneath them rubbed off when the frame is done but most of the other cable guides I have put on have adequate clearance

 

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There's not much left to go! First up was a bit more cable routing, I made a few more cable tie hose guides and popped them on for the derailleur and the front brake hose

20210824_104743.thumb.jpg.ff96691c20b4b6137537a2a8d233df5a.jpg

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For the routing from the front triangle to the rear I needed to come up with some other solution because the cable tie ones like in the photos above take me more than an hour per item. If I set up in more of a production line I could probably bring it down a bit but I didn't feel like making another 6 of them. So I had a think about what would be easy to make on the lathe and would look fairly tidy and came up with these:

20210821_165509.thumb.jpg.f4eb42be5ab265b4c34e338dbe900bd1.jpg

Weld on the the underside of the tube. Pass the cable tie through, around the far side cable and back through and tighten down on the near side cable.

20210821_173204.thumb.jpg.8b646bef009c63dcd06b41132615f1c6.jpg

I forgot to take a picture of them in action, they aren't as tidy as the proper version, but they look fine in practice. Next time around I will put bottle bosses on the underside of the top tube before welding up the front triangle as that would have been my preferred method, but there wasn't clearance to fit a drill post welding. From there you can get stuff like this: https://www.paragonmachineworks.com/catalog/product/view/id/3578/s/aluminum-double-cable-clamp-choose-style/category/77/

 

 

 

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It is mildly terrifying taking an angle grinder and drill to the frame I have spent many hours making. But thats what you have to do to slot the seat tube and fit the cable routing for the dropper post.

I started with marking out and drilling the hole, then moved between angle grinder, hacksaw and file to make the slot and tidy it all up. It turned out pretty well, very pleased with the outcome

20210822_205016.thumb.jpg.7fd318da16f209a2ce839c722ba4c6ac.jpg

I went with the front seat slot which I recon looks a bit uglier because if you ever ride in the rain and mud it decreases the chance on filth getting down your seat tube and seizing the post into the frame. Shouldn't be an issue anyway because of the stainless insert, but better safe than sorry.

Next up I downloaded a 3d model for a grommet for the dropper post cable routing. It measured 8mm wide and 21mm long, so I drew a vertical line on the seat tube and marked out 21mm and drilled 8mm holes at either end and cut a slot with the dremel.

20210823_184138.thumb.jpg.69f9ea79244d51e0cfed1b4f54fb5bfa.jpg

Some of you are probably already seeing the problem with this, I potato brained it up and made a 29mm long slot so the downloaded insert was too short. So I did what I probably should have from the beginning and drew my own grommet to suit my oversized grommet hole (that would be a good insult).

313815943_ScreenShot2021-08-27at5_27_28PM.png.443697d64ae4896c18d65e1e17173a2b.png

The plan with the hole at the top is that I will get a rivnut setter and put a m4 insert in with a nice little cap screw to hold it in place. Press fit works too, but I think this will be a little nicer. 

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Annoyingly I was out of black filament but I had some ancient white stuff lying around that had gone all brittle. Apparently if you pop it in the oven at 50*c for a hour it fixes it, but out oven thermostat is broken and only goes full noise. So I hit it with the heat gun for a couple of minutes being careful not to overheat it and gave it a nudge.

 

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They came out a bit ugly but at least it made it through the extruder. Will have to get some more filament after lockdown.

20210823_212223.thumb.jpg.14c41ba49f3e50df35c0683f15cb64bb.jpg

 

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So I asked a bunch of folks to pick a colour from the pantone colour finder and see what the public opinion on the colour selection is.

https://www.pantone.com/hk/en/color-finder

Here are the candidates:

1557840847_ScreenShot2021-08-29at11_23_09AM.png.4b0566ef5b54a6584a1aed77bfce34a5.png357441767_ScreenShot2021-08-29at11_22_18AM.png.9a4871d48537ebec06bb184f81b6319c.png1426833677_ScreenShot2021-08-29at11_23_25AM.png.c4361a5d4e31d8fde964798aaea49505.png1628526587_ScreenShot2021-08-29at11_23_40AM.png.d3acb8b03b14b8ac8d5c0f7e2f82d022.png

 

And lastly a classic:

1131980872_ScreenShot2021-08-29at11_22_36AM.png.bbaf36b9cf10e628a6efd20663261166.png

I am going to try put up a poll up if I can figure out how to do that.

Edit: Go to top of page for the poll

 

 

 

disclaimer: veto power is held by the frame builder, I reserve the right to change my mind fi you all vote for the ugliest colour

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  • Guypie changed the title to Guypie's Bike frame build - now with interactive poll!
Just now, rumrum said:

clear coat that sucker! be proud of your work and show it off I know I would be 

Theres too many mistakes on this when you look at it in person. I will probably do that on the next frame since the welding has improved somewhat over the build.

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Fuck yeh this is awesome.

Random question. With the front fork, I understand why the axle is where it is (to get some offset/trail or whatever the proper term is). Did you consider mounting the axle on the front/forwards of the fork to achieve the same offset but not run such an angle on the forks? Most rigid forks I've seen (where the axle is generally in line with the forks) have a sweep in them so the angle at the crown is more or less parallel with the steerer but the sweep gives the offset. Just wondering how that angle at the crown will go when you huck it to flat. Maybe that's what they mean when they say huck up pray haha.

Or I've just not looked at enough rigid bikes and this is normal.

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1 hour ago, Beaver said:

Fuck yeh this is awesome.

Random question. With the front fork, I understand why the axle is where it is (to get some offset/trail or whatever the proper term is). Did you consider mounting the axle on the front/forwards of the fork to achieve the same offset but not run such an angle on the forks? Most rigid forks I've seen (where the axle is generally in line with the forks) have a sweep in them so the angle at the crown is more or less parallel with the steerer but the sweep gives the offset. Just wondering how that angle at the crown will go when you huck it to flat. Maybe that's what they mean when they say huck up pray haha.

Or I've just not looked at enough rigid bikes and this is normal.

Yeah I get what you mean like a bmx fork, axle on the front and the legs on the steering axis. I did it this way because I have a lathe and that makes round things easy to make hahaha. So the dropout is easy to interface with the tube in a strong way. as to how it will fare on trail... let's just say I will start off slow. I think take measurements after the first ride or 2 to see if plastic deformation happens before I start sending stuff to flat/going fast, I really don't know how fast I will end up going on the no suspension bike either. Currently running tubes too, so will be nana'ing those so I don't get pinch flats.

This style of fork is usually called a segmented fork, it is pretty common though maybe not with this much offset.

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20210829_190841.thumb.jpg.aae11c08113b9183f3b951d0bc802579.jpg

 

I put couple of coats of 2k primer on the frame (no colour coat yet) and after looking at it sitting in the corner of the lounge for the working week dreaming and pretending to ride it much to the amusement of @hampie, Friday came around. I don't work Fridays so I was free for the day, so I took stock of what I needed to get the bike all together and all that was left was a length of shift cable. So I made a click and collect order and popped down to Te Awamutu and came back and got everything all assembled.

 

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Sorry pics are fuzzy, crappy cellphone life.

The drivetrain is a deore 11 speed, it's actually destined for a different bike but for now it can go on this one. There are some issues around shifting I think partially due to the B screw end point pawl on the hanger being too far to the rear of the bike. I have shortened it a bit since my first ride and it has improved a bit, I think I probably need to check the hanger alignment again as well. Also, there's a weird combination of boost standards with a 68mm bb shell so I think the chain line needs a bit of attention.

In the next exciting instalment: how does it ride?

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  • Guypie changed the title to Guypie's Bike Build - It's done!

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