Unclejake

Removing a broken axle - any tips?

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70 series Land Cruiser. A rear axle has snapped roughly where the inner axle/wheel bearing was. It's a live, solid diff. We have very limited tools, but can probably get access to a welder if we really tried.

Does anyone have any advice for its extraction?

Ta

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remove other side & poke it out with a skinny solid rod?

Semi unlikely it'll be a hollow diff / through the Bearing s & guts but have heard of that method before on small 4's (like Escort & viva etc)

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A magnet on a stick, if you're lucky 

 

Punk

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I'd. Say you'll have to weld.something to it to pull on. But you'll. Have nothing to attach the earth clamp to. 

Pull.the whole diff, and tap that end on the ground

 

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If it's an LSD and has a hole all the way through the centre, punch it out from the other side. 

I assume the diff head is stuck in the housing as a result? 

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Can you reach it with a welding rod?

Get your mate on the power switch of your arc welder and jam a 3.2mm rod onto thw end of the axle with plenty of juice.

1/2 a second after it strikes your mate turns off the power. 

Then pull axle out.

Practice on a bit of steel to get the best time/current for good attachment.

Not great on the bearings, but it will get you going.

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those diffs are semi floating if it has a cover on the back? if it does have a cover no amount of anything will remove the axle as they have big c clips holding the axle in place, pull them out and axle will come out. if it doesn't have a cover on the back then its a full floating axle which i don't think it will be. have spare axles if you get stuck, or whole diff. 

disclaimer; info only valid for early 70 series (late 80's early 90's)

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Thanks Max. The diff is what I'd call semi floating axles with no diff head cover. It's a 2001 build that has been on Chatham Island since new (200,000kms ago) so everything on it is hard work!

It's a five stud flatbed 

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I've worked one of these and it was full floating axles,which would make removing axle a easier job

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Lift the vehicle up on its side and shake vigorously 

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Reminds.me of working on an LD powered Landy over there. The shed didn't have a dirt floor, it was lots of crushed up sea shells. We stripped a nut, and had to go through old fish bins to try find a replacement. Everything was three times as hard as it is here.

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Thanks heaps to all of you for the advice and goodwill. We tried magnets, but yeah, but nah.

After a bit the owner was prepared to take off the other hub and.good axle (which turned out to be a breeze) and incredibly fortunately for us there was a straight aperture through the diff head, so after scavenging some rusty re-bar from a paddock (and a mallet) we eventually  managed to get the broken axle out. 

It was a mission due to the flailing end having torn the internal diff housing in a few places, seriously constricting the axle's exit path.

There were roller bearings everywhere.  The wheel bearing probably collapsed, and then the axle shaft broke. Lordy. Runamuck is correct. Everything (apart from gathering food) is harder here.

Thanks again all. It's genuinely appreciated 

20180810_125648.jpg

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