Giant

diesel spam

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6 hours ago, RUNAMUCK said:

I'm not actually building anything yet. Just building an understanding of it for something I want to build one day.

Compound superturbo diesel stationary engine turning a giant ship turbo ramming m3/s ofair into a tyre powered steam sterling engine?

Or the Simpson Perpetual Motion Machine(TM)*

 

*i couldnt think of a SHARN acronym. Answers ITT

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Nah.

Just a wakeboard boat with an LD28 running an Eaton M90 pushing 1 bar of boost 24/7 (because diesel-no TB full boost always while running) with a water to air intercooler utilising the unlimited supply of cold water that the boat floats in. Zero heat soak, low intake Temps,  stable and safe running. Plus because one bar of boost always no massive black clouds of smoke ever.

And diesel is cheap as fuck. And nothing makes instant torque like a belt driven pump. Perfect for wakeboarding 

 

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One day.

I know a foamer with an unhealthy hoard of LD's. Probs be easiest to buy a v8 fizz boat, and sell the v8 to fund the build.  

It's something to think about when I only own one valiant one Datsun,  my daily, and a racecar. I have five more that that atm.

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5 hours ago, RUNAMUCK said:

Nah.

Just a wakeboard boat with an LD28 running an Eaton M90 pushing 1 bar of boost 24/7 (because diesel-no TB full boost always while running) with a water to air intercooler utilising the unlimited supply of cold water that the boat floats in. Zero heat soak, low intake Temps,  stable and safe running. Plus because one bar of boost always no massive black clouds of smoke ever.

And diesel is cheap as fuck. And nothing makes instant torque like a belt driven pump. Perfect for wakeboarding 

 

Also run on filtered chip fat / used atf and itll pay for itself in lol's in no time. Ah the smell of a good fush and chup while your out on the water.

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I tried the half and half used atf and diesel in my td27 navara for around a year 20,000kms with no problems at all. Then i got greedy and got a 205L drum of unknown ratio petrol diesel mix (fresh from rentals) and the pump seals cried enough.

I had to laugh when the garage that pulled it off was asked by the pump re builder "what the hell is this guy running the thing on cos there's shit everywhere in it and it smells like oil and petrol". My garage said they'd have a word to me but they knew what i was doing.

Petrol was definately the culprit as im now running my ride on with that same 205L - should have tried that first lol.

I had also been running the ATF straight from the flush machine so some sort of filtering prior is a must.

The $1000 bill hurt so havent done it in that diesel since - next up the TD27T Terrano lol.

Anyone else have wacky ideas

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running petrol diesel mix just add some cheap oil to make sure you get lubricity and it'll be mint. 

I had a truck delivered to me by a guy that runs an old leyland truck for fun, but also owns heaps of jetprop planes, and he was running the leyland on 'old' or test jeta1 (the stuff they drain from hoppers or plane for condensation or whatever) 

smelt amaze, and ran like a champ. he added oil to each tank to make it slippery enough for the old fuel gear and reckoned it was heaps more economic.

smoked lots on startup though hha

 

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When i used to work at the airport we had 1000L containers of 'old jet a1' some helicopters had to have the whole tank drained to remove the fuel lift pump, but of course you weren't allowed to put it back in the helicopter so we would sell most of it to the local growers with greenhouses that burnt it for heating, but we also used to use in our trucks, would mix 50/50 with normal diesel fine and but the old boys were always going on about how harsh it was on the diesel pump and stuff, never saw any of them die tho, i guess a tiny bit of 2stroke oil in the mix would soften it up

Never heard of the atf trick, but that could be handy as if your stuck somewhere with low gas!

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Diesel is just kero with extra lubrication additives added. Jet-A1 is just very clean kerosene.  A1 mixed with atf would be legit as. I wonder if full synthetic atf would run an engine though? Some synthetic motor oils are quite resistant to burning.

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Maybe not in a combustion chamber though? They used to say not to run full synthetic oil.in a dorito motor because they use a bit of oil to lube the seals under high throttle

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On 2/27/2018 at 12:19, RUNAMUCK said:

Diesel is just kero with extra lubrication additives added. 

actually?

i allways feel a little crook after using my diesel parts washer but not with kerosene, mabey its a placebo?

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The difference is mostly in the higher sulphur content of diesel - A lot of the topdressing outfits with Crescos and turbine-repowered Fletchers were keen on the idea of being able to refuel on farm via a diesel tank.  The main issue that springs to mind is the deposits left on the blades in the hot section were sufficient enough to throw it out of balance, this resulted in a catastrophic failure.

I'll see what info I can dig up on that, as it's going back a few years now.

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On 2/27/2018 at 12:19, RUNAMUCK said:

Diesel is just kero with extra lubrication additives added. Jet-A1 is just very clean kerosene.  A1 mixed with atf would be legit as. I wonder if full synthetic atf would run an engine though? Some synthetic motor oils are quite resistant to burning.

I remember talking to oil guys while i was at BNT - even full synthetic is not 100% synthetic unless it says its 100% synthetic.

This write up from Motul is very good....

HOW IS MY OIL MADE?
Engine oil is essentially made from two key elements. Engine oil starts with a “base stock” which essentially serves as the bulk of the oil. This can either be made from mineral oil (based from crude oil dug out of the ground) that has been refined into usable oil, or formulated from synthetic compounds into a lubricating fluid with the same viscosity as mineral oil.
These base stocks are then enhanced with additives and detergents that take an engine oil’s capability from simple lubrication and allow it to cling to the surfaces of your engine. In doing so, as the oil flows through your engine, is also works by cleaning and protecting it from wear, oxidation, corrosion and the build-up of harmful sludge and deposits. When combined, these oils and additives are made to operate at the very high temperatures and pressures that arise in your engine, and vary in viscosity (the ease of how freely it flows) as your engine warms up.
While that all sounds simple enough, many oil companies have simply added confusing marketing spins to their oil namesakes, which serve no real indicative purpose of what the base oil is comprised of. And here-in lies the source of much confusion.

THE PROBLEM WITH ‘FULL SYNTHETIC’ OIL
The main problem with oils is that there is no actual regulation for what comprises an oil, or what is required of an oil, for it to be classed “Full-Synthetic”.
Fact is, in many cases, oils claimed to be fully synthetic are often made by highly refining and synthesising mineral oils to achieve a higher degree of purity than would otherwise have been achievable. Other times they may also be made using a large degree of actual synthetic oil, but are still not essentially “Full” synthetic by any means. They would more appropriately still be semi-synthetic oils.
As you can imagine, it pays to check with the oil manufacturer on what the base stocks of their Fully Synthetic Oil are actually made of. A lot of the time, you’ll be quite surprised to learn that they are actually not fully synthetic oils at all in nature, only by marketing name.
With the benefit of the doubt – it could well be 100% synthetic oil… but it could also be 90%, or 60%, or even 2%. In short, fully synthetic oil is a marketing term that in no way defines the quantity of synthetic content.

100% SYNTHETIC OIL
In order to make higher quality oils, high-performance oil companies will essentially develop molecules from scratch, which are then synthesised and produced free of any mineral or crude oils.
By doing this, the greatest advances in automotive oils are made, as new compounds and molecules are developed that are capable of greater lubrication, greater protection and higher resistance to pressure. This also means that companies can control the quality of every drop of oil in your bottle, as opposed to having to refine the quality of mineral base oils.
And the best part is, there is no escaping this 100% Synthetic terminology with fancy or confusing marketing terms. If it is so-called such, it must be 100% Fully Synthetic by regulation.
When you see the words 100% Synthetic on a bottle, such as in Motul’s H-Tech, 8100 and 300V ranges, that means that EVERY SINGLE DROP of oil in your bottle is a synthetically produced compound, mixed with fully synthetic additives. Guaranteed.

SEMI SYNTHETIC, SYNTHETIC BLENDS AND SYNTHETIC TECHNOLOGY
Many Synthetic Technology oils are made entirely of the aforementioned crude oils that have been synthesised into higher purity oils as mentioned prior, they’re just more honestly labelled.
Once mineral oils, synthesised mineral oils and synthetic base stocks are mixed into different blends, this is where the terms “Semi-Synthetic” and “Synthetic Technology” come into play. Synthetic blend oils come with a wide degree of these labels, and generally they consist of some form of mineral oil that has been enhanced with Synthetic base stocks.
Nowadays, the terms 'semi-synthetic', and 'synthetic base', are overused. These terms are also not regulated and therefore only a few drops of a synthetic base oil can be added to a mineral base oil to make it a “semi-synthetic”. Obviously the performance and protection of such a lubricant will be more like a mineral product than a synthetic product. Motul only uses one term for its semi synthetic technology – Technosynthese.
Motul's Technosynthese® lubricants are made from a very special blend of different synthetic base oils which can also include esters and mineral base oils for optimising performance, whilst considering market price implications. Many Technosynthese® lubricants can achieve the most demanding and stringent OEM approvals, which is a testament of their performance and quality.
There’s so much confusion when it comes to oil, but by doing your research and investing in a trusted brand such as Motul, you can avoid the marketing spin that comes with a great deal of engine oils.
Look for 100% synthetic on the label, and do your research when considering investing in a full or semi-synthetic oil.

In other words - "should burn mint in your coal roller" lol.

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I remember hearing they turn natural gas in to engine oil via some magic process

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On ‎1‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 23:31, Giant said:

I remember hearing they turn natural gas in to engine oil via some magic process

not all but some. it is a process used. fully synthetic is made somewhat like that in some processes. basically if you throw enough energy and science at things with carbons and hydrogens you can make whatever length chains with bits on the end that you like. you can start with gas, oil, or even coal or trees. then you just have to burn a lot of coal or trees and expensive proprietary catalysts to get it to fall to bits and stick back together in the form or whatever else it is you want out.

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What effect might fitting a lighter flywheel from a petrol.engine onto a diesel have ? I've heard of big diesels (like a bus) idling faster with a lighter flywheel?

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Due to their much higher compression they experience much more crankshaft deceleration, so I dunno if it's really a good idea unless you have more cylinders. No idea how it goes in reality though so try it and report back.

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