Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 28/09/20 in all areas

  1. Phew- been busy. Lots done = update time. But to save my sanity I might do it in two lots. So as per @GregT bit of information above I looked into motorbike oil pump chains and yeah- bugger all have tensioners and they actually run quite loose. I then decided to scrap the idea of spring loaded tensioners because even with the ones I had they were still a bit awkward to fit and didn't quite work in the angle I would have wanted. So enter stage left my new adjustable tensioner device... which fits like this... The bolts that clamp it down are actually accessible from below with the sump plate removed so once the chains wear to a point that I'm not happy with I can tension them independently. The will be nyloc nuts replacing those normal nuts on the tensioner bolts when the final assembly takes place. So with that finally finished I moved on down. The sump cover. It has to be fairly beefy because it could see some hits plus the engine will rest on it when on the bench. It has to be alloy so It can be used as a useful heat sink to pull heat from the oil. It has to look cool for when the Barries look under the car. So some fins were in order. I bought a big lump of alloy from Ulrich aluminium. That hurt. I put it through the old table saw and did some rough cuts just to save on time milling... Into the mill and did milly things. It was going to take bloody ages thought so I made a new tool which I shall call the DDC. 'Dewalt drill control' ... It could always be an MDC. Makita drill control. My cunning design is adaptable. In action... Groovy man... Then the sides taken down... I stopped there. The bit that is left unslotted will be machined to suit a recessed sump plug. I wont do any more until I finish the front cover below the cambelts where I'll also be adding some engine mount points. Next up was to finish the adaptor plate that connects the engine to the gearbox bellhousing. I had machined a bunch of pedestals to an exact length I had worked out to suit the positioning of the spigot shaft on the end of the first motion shaft into the spigot bearing. These pedestals have been machined on the gearbox end to locate within the dowel like spot faced bolt holes on the bellhousing. This way there was no chance of any float in any direction - the box would always be perfectly concentric to the engines crank and the bolts are really just clamping it. I bolted it all up together... Then cut some strips of 4mm alloy plate and started bending them to suit. Connecting the pedestals... Once I was happy with the fit up of those filler strips I ran a marker pen around them and took it all apart. Then cut the plate back to the lines in the bandsaw. Well I did so for a while but due to several things including the bandsaw having a totally rooted bearing collapse in the saws gearbox so making blade run off the driving wheel. plus the only course pitch blade having some missing teeth I ended up using the jigsaw. Anyway- got there in the end. Pieced it back together and it looked like this... Now time to weld it all together. I knew this was going to be tricky because the whole lot is like one huge heatsink and our current power cable to the workshop and the subsequent circuit breakers I have installed as a safety net wont allow me to run the welder at enough amps for such a mass of alloy - sit on 150 amps for any longer then 20 secs and it would trip. If I had a big enough oven I'd heat the whole lot up together nice and slowly. But I don't. So I just had to be strategic about it and work fast because once I stopped welding the heat soon dispersed. Luckily the welds just have to be strong and functional because it would all be smoothed down with a flap disc for a more factory casting look I wanted. It turned out good and best of all it hadn't warped so the box still fitted correctly and neatly. I was happy with that and it was now time to move on to the next stage which was the starter motor fitment. That will be in the next exciting instalment
    85 points
  2. painted. 2021-02-14_11-35-37 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-35-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-53 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-46 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-38 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-31 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-17 by sheepers, on Flickr
    81 points
  3. car went to the paint shop to get the runs out of it and get the final cut and polish. i went and picked it up last night and it looks amazing. anywho, today i wanted to fix the exhaust where the flex joint had worn through because its the lowest point and its had a fucking over judder bars and whatnot and subsequently has a hole it in. step 1 - jack up your car. this is where things went wrong. 2021-04-25_02-55-42 by sheepers, on Flickr car slid off the jack on the way up. given what could have happened i got off extremely lightly. it bent the radiator support up and bent the bottom of the radiator real bad. it also bent the bottom of the front bumper. however, the radiator isn't leaking and the crank pulley is unscathed which is a fucking miracle given what happened. i was able to bash the rad support back down and i got most of the bend out of the bumper so it looks fairly normal again. fuck it could have been WAY worse.................. so yea, after dealing with that i moved on to fixing the zorst. cut out the fucked bit, made a new bit, tacked it in place, remove zorst from car and fully weld, add 4mm thick bash plate and put zorst back in car. 2021-04-25_02-55-49 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-55-55 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-09 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-21 by sheepers, on Flickr then it was time to wax the newly polished paint. that went well. it looks pretty ace tbh and yea, i cant take a photo that justifies how good it looks. but it looks good. take my word for it. 2021-04-25_05-34-27 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-18-48 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-19-23 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-32-09 by sheepers, on Flickr
    74 points
  4. Ohh yeah it worked!!!! One minor defect where one of the thin standoffs didnt vent. But thats a simple weld job. Other than that it went awesome! She was a pretty big job!
    71 points
  5. Here we go then with another sporadic update. So, encouraged by a few people I have been putting in a little bit of effort on this in an attempt to get it to Toyota Festival, later this month. Nick the Sparky and I put in a couple of days in the shed at his place, where he did sparky things, I occasionally helped with sparky things, but I also stripped the old interior and put the new bits in. From there, I took the car to @sheepers, and he did some choice stuff for me which included a driveshaft loop, and mounting the freshly retrimmed Recaro LX (Fishnet) seats. Also while it was there I drained the synthetic (wrong) oil from the gearbox and put the right (mineral) stuff back in it, as it was giving me some strife. More on that soon. Lewis Horrell in Ashburton is responsible for the killer retrim. I wanted to match the seats to the plastics, and he managed to find a stunning option. We'd been talking about this for a long time - I wanted either a houndstooth or a tartan to channel both early Porsches (which I adore), and also the period the KP was designed in. I reckon it turned out all right. The gearbox has some shifting problems on the downshift from 4th to 3rd and 3rd to 2nd - initially we suspected clutch drag and maybe a mismatch of master cylinder to clutch cylinder, but after Davo's old man Earle dropped in and helped me through a few checks (he's a real T50-whisperer) his diagnosis is something in the selector or synchro area - so it's gonna be a gearbox out job shortly, nevermind. However, I will still be getting the car onto the dyno with @kpr and @Stu at some stage in the next couple of weeks, as we can hook 4th with no problem do the doort things! Pictures below: 20210110_181421-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Grabbing some sun after a full day of work. 20210110_181852-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is pretty much the final version of the engine bay, I haven't clipped the loom along the sides of the block yet, but it should be all sorted out post-dyno. 20210110_180317-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Got the dash back in for the first time in 5 years. Some plastic repairs on broken parts mean it is now secured better than it ever has been in my ownership of the car. The fake brushed ally of the factory dash has been re-overlaid with a textured vinyl. 20210110_172923-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr The Stack bits all lit up. Tach output isn't turned on in the Link yet, and we are struggling to get a useful signal for the speedo. But shouldn't be too tricky to solve, just need some advice from some experts and Nick reckons we can make it tell the speed! 20210110_180414-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr' Recaro LX in sumptuous maroon, with matching door cards (new CNC cut from 3mm tempered hardboard) 20210110_182113-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Absolute must to have the RECARO logo embroidered on in the proper location. 20210110_182416-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Imagine having rears that match? Well, you don't have to, because they match! 20210110_183559-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Wilwoods peeking through the Star Brights. It stops well, and it's only going to get better! 20210110_182557-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Top down! You can see the interior and the engine bay, I'm pretty stoked on this to be honest. It has come together better than I could have ever imagined ten years ago, when I pulled it all to pieces. As you can probably tell there's still plenty to do, like carpets and stuff. But the list is signficantly smaller, and there is no way I could have done this myself - I owe so much of this to a handful of really generous (especially with their time) and talented people I probably don't give enough dues. So thanks, if you're reading.
    70 points
  6. Starter motor time. I had bought a Subaru leone 1.8 starter from the fella I'd got the gearboxes and 1.8 ring gear from. Made sense to use all the same bits. Only thing I'd have to do was move the mounting face for the starter forwards towards the engine to suit the new ring gear position on my home made flywheel... Easy as I thought and I had it all planned out. I shall start at dawn! However that's not what happened once I got a friendly query from a fella about the starter motor turning the engine the wrong way. Oh yeah. Bugger. Of course it will do that. Yay. So after a few ideas and suggestions from various folk I had a few options. My first option was to mount the Subaru starter on the front of the bellhousing adaptor, facing backwards. Essentially turn it 180 degrees and it would spin the Honda engine in the required anti-clockwise direction I needed. But would it fit? Yes it does... It wouldn't be too tricky to mount and on extension the pinion almost lined up perfectly with the ring gear. It sat down in place quite low too. So this solution was a strong contender. But it had a couple of weaknesses that meant it went to the back burner. One: the ring gear would need turning around so the leads shaped into the teeth faced the pinion. Turning it round and having the pinion strike it from the opposite side then meant that the step I had machined into the flywheel would have been on the wrong side and the gear could potentially work off over time. I was reluctant about the idea I could add a few welds, as some folk will do, because it adds stress risers, could affect the balance. I really didn't want to muck about with the ring gear. Two: having a fairly large ugly starter motor plonked right there on the top of the motor was something I never had in my minds pictures of how I wanted the engine bay to look. It would be right where I might want some linkages for the itbs, possibly a centrally mounted plenum between the itbs and there was also going to be some water pipes around that area too. So back to the other options- the main one being to look for a suitable Honda starter that's mounted from the gearbox side or a starter from any standard clockwise rotating engine that mounts from the front. The pinion had to have the same pitch and ideally the same tooth count. I did some research and it seemed that all the Japanese cars of this era all shared the same pinion pitch and were all around the 9 or 10 teeth. This was handy indeed. Off to the wreckers then... I went through the various shelves of starters, starting with Honda and found a possible candidate within a couple of minutes. Feeling pretty satisfied with my find I still double checked the other shelves just in case there was something even better but eventually I was spotted skipping out of the door happy with my Honda Civic/accord starter. Back home I looked at my booty. Subaru one is on the left... They were so close but not close enough. The Honda item has a smaller diameter 'locating spigot' that centralises it in the hole on the mounting face of the bell housing. This was a better turnout than it being bigger than the hole though! I would machine the hole in the plate to suit the new starter, which I was going to have to do for the original plan using the Subaru one anyway. The holes for the starter mounting bolts, that go through the bell housing into the engine, were 5mm closer at about 115mm and they were also offset to one side, not in line with the starters centreline. This was handy though because I could then have separate bolts holding the bell housing and room to turn the Honda starter about its axis, having the solenoid positioned in the least obstructive way. A plan was forming in my head. I took some measurements, did some scribbles and it all looked like it should work ok... I had already bought a hefty bit of 12mm plate for the Subaru starter repositioning and luckily it was still going to work with the new starter. I swapped the 4 jaw chuck onto the lathe and set it up. Drilled a big hole... Bored the hole out to suit the Honda starter spigot... Marked and drilled holes to suit... Recessed and spot faced one of the holes for the bellhousing to the engine bolts that just happened to slightly clash with a bit of the starter casting. So I now had a plate that the starter fitted neatly into, with not a hint of slop. The bolt holes lined up perfectly with the bellhousing bolt holes so lining the starter up the correct distance out from the ring gear. Now I need to move the face of this plate closer to the engine... So I cut a big lump of alloy from the bellhousing with a grinder and a hacksaw... This allowed me to move the plate closer and let the pinion fully engage with the ring gear... I tested the fit of the starter... The height was good but I wanted it to be perfectly parallel to the face of the flywheel so I really had to mill it. Luckily I was just able to squeeze the gearbox into a position on the mill that allowed me to face it perfectly... I must have some pretty honed hacksaw skills because I only needed to skim off about .75mm to get it flat. Sweet. Now I bolted the plate in place, then the starter and tested it... Oh I forgot to mention that once I had decided I was going to use a starter mounted in the original position I popped a hole through the adaptor plate in line with the starter pinion. This was to allow me to check the pinion mesh... I was super happy with the mesh so I marked the excess on the plate to be trimmed off and gave it a hair cut in the bandsaw... I also milled out the back of the plate where it just clashed with the rivets and pressings on the outer edge clutch pressure plate. Bolted it back in and welded it up, taking lots of care to avoid any chance of movement or warping. It went well.. Added some little filler plates to tie it in neatly and gave it a tickle with a flap disc... Bolted the starter back in, stood back and admired it all, really happy that one of the trickier jobs had been completed and that the starter was sitting in there very neatly and tucked away nicely, no higher than the top of the bellhousing... Next step was to make a cover for the 'front' of the engine, adding a connecting link between the oil filter outlet and the main oil way into the engine, a filling point for the sump, a dipstick and allocations for engine mounts to suit a cross member. Still lots of work to do but I'm getting closer...
    68 points
  7. its coming along. im just tidying up all the little things that need doing. ive got some generic belt line rubbers coming for it then i can put the door cards back on. the bumpers are away being chromed and ill get them back in a week or so. not sold on the black center caps and i have another set on order should be here middle of next month. i drove it up the road to get some milk and i fucking love driving this thing, its fucking slow but its cool to just cruze along in and i can see myself doing a bunch of Ks in this as soon as i tidy u the last few things. believe it or not its still got a warrant! 2021-03-18_07-56-27 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-37 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-45 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-52 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-58 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-57-04 by sheepers, on Flickr
    68 points
  8. So over the last few days we have been tinkering away. Its neat sized truck that fits into the workshop nicely. Will be good when it comes to building the new deck and then the steel framework for the house later on. Our hoist is rated to lift 4 tonne so technically it could lift this truck. However I see that 4 tonne as a Chinese 4 tonne and don't really trust its actually a proper 4 tonne. I think I'll pass .. Anyway- old truck in workshop = nice... The first job to do was pull out all of the interior. Rats had obviously found it a nice cosy place to stay in so it all needed to go. Plus Wayne had to fit another seat to get it through a cof because the old one was so shot and had metal showing- now a test failure. But the Marina seat he fitted sat me too high. Luckily there was a good seat in the spares truck. I think Wayne must have had a go at removing that from the spares truck but two seized bolts had stopped him. We however had luckily brought out our cordless angle grinder on the day of pick up- always a handy tool to have about. So we managed to cut the bolts and free the seat. It cleaned up nicely and sat much lower. Next item was the throttle pedal assembly. The original beford item of rods and linkages was horrid and like mentioned earlier meant your foot had to stand almost upright and was really uncomfortable. We popped to the local wreckers and looked through the toyota vans there- I knew that one like in our hiace van could work a treat. We nabbed a setup from a super custom hiace and also grabbed a rubber gear lever boot from a mazda ute (because the bedford one was an old ripped vinyl thing that needed to be replaced). Plus a brake servo from the same ute for a future job on the TK. Hannah then removed all of the throttle pedal and linkage assembly. Youu can see the difference between the hiace item vs the bedford stuff below... I made a plate bolt the hiace pedal to and welded it onto the A piller.. The cable was luckily just long enough. The bracket to take the cable outer was in the wrong place so that I adapted... And all in place working... While I was finishing this Hannah set to removing the old dog box. It had to go because I wanted to move the batteries. The truck was converted to 24v to suit the Nissan engine. They added another battery and cradle to suit but it all takes up space right where you want to stand to have access on the passenger side of the engine bay... So Hannah ended up on the ground having fun with old seized bolts and rusty steel... I started dealing to the seating arrangement on the passenger side. The KM cab was designed around a much taller engine I think. There was no double seat, instead a removable access hatch I guess so you could adjust the front most tappets etc. This meant our double seat taken from the parts truck wouldnt fit. So I cut out the tunnel bit and altered things... Made a new lid to suit, keeping it removable because access there could always be handy... Made a new bit to suit the new gear stick rubber gaitor too. Painted it all... Fitted it back in complete with a nice old gear knob that originally came from a 60s Foden truck in the UK and then found a place in my V6 Viva. I kept it when I sold that Viva and now its got a home in the Bedford. I had to tap the threads out to suit. Spot the gear knob that was fitted previously - I guess a safari item? Could be anything but I think the new one looks more in keeping... While I was playing with my knob Hannah set to work on her rim (of the cab..) She dug out all the lifting seam sealer and can up some light surface rust and then painted the lot with Por 15. This will hold it until full paint later on. Luckily as the truck had mainly been stored inside it was in great condition around the roofline. I welded up the hole left when we removed the aerial. No room for an aerial sticking up there when there will soon be a bedroom floor residing there instead... Sort of up to date now. Thanks to the powers of social media I got this lovely response from a fella on the book of faces NZ Bedford group about our new project... "This truck is very special to us and loved driving this ole girl a few times during the hay making season.It originally belonged to my late father in law Cyril Higgins. Since his passing my brother in law Wayne has taken over the grand ole girl. If only she could talk. This truck has many happy memories for both my wife Jen ( Wayne's sis) and I on the farm. Loved seeing it go up Spooner range driven by my brother with pedal to the metal lol then cruze thru the Motupiko/Korere valley to feed out / check stock on the back country farm etc as they would do on a very regular basis. Would hope you get as much fun and enjoyment out it as we have. Would love to become part of your progress trail blog if you would be kind enough to include us please. Will post some photos up of the ole girl for as we come across them . Those were great days for us as we are sure they will be great days and memories ahead for you and your family..... Jen & Den " Den also posted up some cool pics of the truck in action... This is super cool and really made our day when we got that message. Den is now following the build here on Oldschool so we better do a worthy job I'm just loving the bit of history you can get with an old truck like this- makes it all the more fun to restore.
    67 points
  9. Hannah and I have been looking for a suitable truck to build another house on since selling the Hino. We wanted something a bit smaller than the 5 m wheelbase we had been used to. A bit more of a manageable size for little holidays plus the new house is to be removable so the truck can be used for work/play. We'd been looking at a variety of different trucks- some ex-fire service, some at a local wreckers. We'd been offered another Hino at an OK price and it was a 4m wheelbase. Then a couple of weeks ago Damian @dmulally asked me if I could look over a Bedford TK listed on the book of faces that was local to us. No worries. I like looking at old trucks and it was a good excuse to go for a hoon in the Imp. Here's a couple of pics I took that morning of the viewing.. Upon viewing we promptly fell in love with it and since Damian wanted a tipper, which this wasn't, he very kindly let us have first refusal on his find. But we did had to have a little think about it... At 3m the wheelbase was far shorter than what I have been planning the next house build on. I re-did some drawings and we sussed out some ideas. Deciding that with our mezzanine build giving us a huge amount of living space we realised we didn't need a massive housetruck. Also the idea of utilising some decent sized pop outs excited my designing itch. Other bonus points for the fact the little truck would be so easy to move about the yard plus in and out from under the planned 'house on stilts' , the fact it was a proper classic, a model Hannah had owned for many years and we both lived in while in the UK. Its rated at 6.5 ton with a current tare weight of 2.8. Ample allowance for a small house build plus its in a cheaper RUC bracket! The fact the truck had a really neat bit of history and was a one family owned truck from new with the seller, Wayne, being a very friendly bloke who really loved his old truck. It had been bought new by his Grandad and then his dad used it eventually being passed onto Wayne when his Dad died. It was still being used to run out the hay etc and is pretty much always kept road legal. The cab had been swapped in the 90s after an electrical fire had damaged the old cab beyond repair. The new cab was off a larger engined bigger KM model Bedford- hence the different grill and lights as fitted at the factory for those models. They had the Nissan safari/civilian engine fitted in the early 2000s after the 4 cylinder Isuzu went pop. They wanted a much smoother 6 and loved this conversion. A rust free cab, decent history and fitted with a 4.2 Nissan Diesel engine, all road legal for 5k. Bugger it- lets just do it! Last weekend we went back to collect the truck. It has been garaged most of its life... Currently sharing a shed with a very cool old tractor.. While we were there we got a nice tour from Wayne of the old seed thrashing machines his Dad had installed in around 1965 or thereabouts. They all still work and he showed us some of them running... While we were out there Wayne let us nab a few spares from the old TK he had in a field. Some seats in better condition and some standard TK single headlights in case we decide to swap it back that style (although growing to like the twins..) Said our goodbyes and promised to stay in touch as Wayne is interested in what becomes of his little truck. I drove it home, soon remembering how low the windscreen top is for tall folk. The seat that Wayne had fitted to see it through more recent cofs is from a Morris marina and sits too high. That will be fixed asap I thought. The throttle pedal was an awful design and sat almost vertical at idle. Tricky to moderate and my ankle had to contort heaps making the drive uncomfortable. But otherwise it all went well. The engine seemed fine and pulled well up the hills on the way home, even seeming a bit faster than our van. No doubt things will slow down with a house on board - but folk should never race about in their houses now should they... That evening we popped down to the beach and the doc carpark so Hannah could take it for a hoon. I took some pics... Once home again we parked it in front of the shed and started planning out a few tidy up jobs and modifications to make it nicer to drive. More on that soon
    66 points
  10. Dyno day. Glen beat on the poor old girl like a rented mule and it took it all like a champ. Only had one small issue with spark plug boots not being tight enough and it starting missing at high boost. That was easy fixed and it ended up making 460RWKW at 25psi. I still have a new intercooler to fit and then it'll get a new tune but it won't change much. If I thought it was frightening before I got a whole new level of violence to learn about. Graph shows old turbo tune and new turbo tune at both boost levels for each.
    65 points
  11. Chassis Update: My Dads been working away on this when he has a spare minute. Been making various press tools and working out a process. Starting to look like a chassis rail! Not the easiest way of doing it but definitely the most authentic! Also if anyone needs a clock or a barometer restored hes your go to. As long as it doesnt take away chassis building time!
    64 points
  12. Did an awesome trade today. I now have a T57 crankshaft. Pretty lucky that it was less than 2hours away from me and the guy was awesome. Traded a bunch of my Lotus stuff + few $, he definitely did me a solid! Crankshaft from Engine #210 Rods from Engine #293
    63 points
  13. 20210129_194419-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Toyota Fest later this morning. Can't sleep. Too amped. Finishing touches to the detailing this evening, then I sat and looked at it for a bit. Man, I am super into this thing.
    61 points
  14. 2020-10-20_08-24-38 by sheepers, on Flickr 2020-10-20_08-24-30 by sheepers, on Flickr 2020-10-20_08-24-21 by sheepers, on Flickr 2020-10-20_08-24-08 by sheepers, on Flickr
    61 points
  15. Painted the door window frames in 2k matte black and then assembled them back together. Hatch assembled and back on. Finally found some factory fender mirror, in pretty good condition too! Sanded the tail lights and sprayed them with some clearcoat. Got it off the rotisserie in the weekend, after being on it for 16 months!
    59 points
  16. So, long time no update. I have been holding off as shit was so nearly there for fucking weeks but kept on dragging on... Early September it got shipped off to Wellington; Then early October it arrived back home with a very excited son of a truckie.. Then I got the list from the cert man and was pleased/kind of surprised how short it was; - Needs rear headrests - Extra size on the driveshaft hoop mounts - Front seatbelts needed to web clamp type not inertia - Change a vac hose for proper auto stuff - Wheel alignment That was it and apart from sourcing the seatbelts it was all done in that weekend with the help of some butty ramps I had made for this sort of thing; So if anyone needs a brand new set of vertical fit reels, hit me up. Then I waited for the cert man to approve all that and get the plate done - this was another couple of weeks... Then the compliance man was on holiday and couldn't do anything for another couple of weeks... Then I realised much to my disappointment that the head was probably cracked as it was using water and pressurising the system That will teach me to not get things checked by professionals and just trusting to the prime cause. So while I was waiting for the compliance man I dragged out the spare head out of the container and sent it to Mean Machine for crack testing. This came up sweet but the valves were dodgy and the surface was a bit banana. So I got it surfaced and the valves and seats recut, plus I got a spare set of injectors rebuilt as i didn't want to fuck up the newly sorted head. Getting it in and out was not too much of a drama with a bit of channel clamped to the forklift forks. I didn't really take any pics of all this as I was on a bit of a mission, just this one of the freshened head put back in place; New gaskets, head bolts, slightly thicker oil plus filters plus coolant and much money out of my account and the jobs a goodun. Then fast forward to today and we have this very very exciting situation early this morning... Resulting in this even more exciting situation this afternoon; Ah shit yes. Anyway there is still a bit to do, I am not happy with the radiator situation as it is pretty much relying on the fan even at road speed. I can fit a standard Safari rad in the same hole but with much bigger collection area, plus I have some cunning plans to duct more air toward it so at least on the open road it isnt cycling the fan. Still I'm pretty happy, it has been a long but satisfying road. Beer will be drunk tonight I imagine....
    56 points
  17. Rightyo, I'm pretty damn excited about my recent purchase so thought I'd share it now, although the car isn't in my possession yet ... Longish sharn below; After selling my 323 wagon in January for (IMO) silly money, I was immediately on the look out for another car, this time preferably a rotary. An option of taking out a 5-10k loan was on the cards, giving me a max budget of around 20-25k. I'd looked at a few cars locally, rx7, rx323, rx626 etc. Either they weren't ticking the right boxes, or would have required more money to get them legal than my budget could stretch to. And from previous experiences around paying off a loan whilst owning an old car, it does get hard trying to either keep the car running whilst paying off the loan, let alone saving money for modifications etc. So I made the decision to not get a loan and keep within my actual budget. Nothing rotary in NZ was going to happen with sub 15k, well nothing that appealed to me anyways. So after reading through the importing from Japan thread and picking a few people's brains that have 'been there, done that'. I began searching Japanese sites for a car that I'd be happy with and contacted Stacked to act on my behalf, and to help with questions I had on particular cars and more information that I wanted from the sellers. https://oldschool.co.nz/index.php?/topic/55223-importing-from-japan/ I eventually narrowed the search down to 3 cars that were within my budget: 1979 mazda familia (323) wagon - still piston - still for sale actually if anyone was wanting to buy it, considering I sold my yellow rough one for almost 12k, this does seem like it could be worth while buying https://www.carsensor.net/usedcar/detail/CU5545473225/index.html?TRCD=200002&RESTID=CS210610 1981 Mazda Luce - not for sale anymore, but was 13B, automatic - luxury barge spec mazda 3rd option is the one I've pulled the trigger on and purchased - and just received confirmation today from Autohub that it's ready and waiting for shipping to NZ! 1985 Mazda Cosmo, 13B model, with, unfortunately an automatic gearbag. I only have the crap quality images below, but the car appears tidy, a little bit of rust in the doors, and thanks to one of @S124AB's contact in Japan, I was able to obtain some better quality pics which showed the underside of the car looking relatively clean and tidy. I priced up shipping, GST and a conservative compliance budget and this was affordable with no loan required. Anything rotary and manual seems to equal more dollars in Japan, so I'll live with the automatic for now. Plans will be; Get legal Lower Wheels Cruise and enjoy Save up for a manual swap, coilovers, cert, maybe engine porting of some sorts. Will update once the car arrives at my place. I'll either be really happy with the condition, or I'll be selling as parts lol
    55 points
  18. This showed up at home today - pretty happy with how tidy it is, certainly not mint, but I would have been shocked if it was. Flat battery, no engine coolant and a little exhaust leak will be the first little jobs to do, along with oil change and filters too. Chatted to a local compliance place that will do a pre compliance check over and point out any likely repairs needed, before doing a full on compliance inspection so will try get it to them in the next week or two
    55 points
  19. Yesterday afternoon I got to make use of the truck when we helped the neighbours do the hay. Every year we and a few other local farmers help them out with the hay and then we all get pissed and eat way more food than one should. Always a grand afternoon out Its been noted that flat deck farm utes suitable for hay are getting less common around these parts so they are super stoked we now have this truck...
    55 points
  20. It's at the stage now where it looks like I've done fuck all Which is sort of true. Have been too busy to get a lot of time on it But have been chipping away at small jobs Carb rebuilt Alternator mounts made Throttle cable done Mod and painted the carb hat Calipers cleaned up and painted Radiator finished Hose shapes mocked up just have to find something that sort of fits Turbo oil drain 90% sorted just need a fitting for the block end Takes ages when everything needs blasting and painting and then it seems best to leave it for a week to harden properly
    54 points
  21. Got the body in primer about 6 weeks ago It then took me all that time to get it up to a reasonable state so that it could then be painted. So then a couple days a go we loaded it up on the trailer (only just fit!) and dragged it into the spray booth at work. Sprayed the base and clearcoat on, it turned out pretty good! A few runs around in places, but nothing that can't be fixed. Pretty stocked really! Could of easily gone wrong haha. Gonna leave it in the booth for a few more days to harden, then take it home and get some underseal on the underside. In the meantime get the rest of the panels ready for some paint too.
    54 points
  22. Had a bit of a cockup When I pulled the motor out of the white car and stored it, I put a rag in the dizzy hole to stop shit getting in there Being so long ago, I forgot how big it was I also forgot to remove it when I set the rockers It appears the oil pump drive went om nom nom on the rag . It was quite hard to get out and it was a bit chewed When I got it out there was one bit missing out of the rag that I could not find . I mucked around for ages with the vacuum down the dizzy hole and got a bit of fluff out I deemed getting the rag out to be an essential service so went to work and got my snake camera and grabby thing, found the offending bit of rag hiding in the sump next to the oil pump and did a doctor spec cottonectomy Phew
    53 points
  23. Finished and loaded up. Probably the most expensive and elaborate way to lower an El Camino! Looks like we'll see how good these bump stops are!
    53 points
  24. Got some longer wheel studs for the front. Painted the hubs and installed some new genuine Toyota wheel bearings and seals. Have also changed the front springs to some shorter 5kg ones and added some keeper springs. Need to find some 100-130mm long 4kg springs for the rear, but they're proving hard to find. Painted the inside of the hatch, doors and bonnet. Finally managed to finish prepping the rest of the panels and took them into work this weekend. Had a bit of drama with the base coat being the wrong tint, as I had another 2 litres mixed up since there was only about 1-1.5 litres out of a 4 litre tin left after doing the body and didn't want to run out. Turned out the new mix was a bit darker, but managed to get 2 coats of that on and then one coat of the previous left overs sprayed on top. So hopefully it matches to the body! Stoked with how it turned out! I sprayed the basecoat and then my coworker Justin came and sprayed the clear on, so thanks to him for doing such a good job! Assembled a few bits today. Could just stare at this thing all day!
    53 points
  25. Home again. Real pleased with the results and it cost less than I thought it was going to, as I'd asked Grant to paint the wheels and a couple of other bits, and respray the black parts that got primer overspray at the blasting place It's hard to get a good pic of the colour as it seems quite different depending on light and the camera Now i just have to not fuck it up too much as I put it back together
    53 points
  26. Suspension partially done, 2" drop spindles, 3" lower springs in the front , and diff put on top of the springs in the back. I drew up a notch and got that laser cut, that's ready to pick up this week so next job is to whip the tray off and glue the notch in and make some shock mounts One of the front shocks fell apart when I took it out , that explains the rattle in the front suspension I'm not sure if the wheels will stay, one has started rusting already and its probably going to rub once the front bumpstops get a trim and the rear has some travel. So I'll probably put the stock wheels back on And waiting for some new front shocks I ordered a couple of weeks ago but I think covid has slowed that down
    52 points
  27. Well it didnt 100% work. But it could definitely be fixed with a welder! It didnt fill fast enough and there wasnt enough pressure. So they had to frantically fill from one of the riser holes to try save it. In doing that there is a big section of cold lap and a big hole! So the changes would be to have 2 filling sprues in the middle of the casting. Then increase the head pressure a little bit. The bowl I had in the sprue was way too big and reduced the head pressure. For the most part it looks pretty good. All the finer details are there. No cores collapsed or shifted, no shrinking of any areas so I dont need to worry about chill blocks. El Camino for scale. Going to have to figure out an easier way to do this in the shed. Was way too much work!
    52 points
  28. So it's been roughly 6 months and 5000kms, I thought I would do a situation report; It's fucking amazeballs. It's not stupidly big so I can use it as a daily no problem, although I do need to choose my parking spots a bit carefully. It's still big enough and industrial enough to make sure that merging like a zip is a given. It's actually really comfortable to drive, plus it's rock solid on the road. It will happily sit at 100 or so no problem. I'm getting on average 12.5l/100km, not amazing but not bad either. It is pretty lively off the mark so a reasonable balance. It takes a shitload of stuff. I put 45 sheets of 12mm ply on it the other day, 750 or 800kg, no problem. The deck is also big enough to take sizable items, it's way better than the townace for that. It's still quite noisy, I must find some vinyl and redo the floor with some deadening. I put some extra speakers on the dash that I got from the dump shop for $6, this helps me hear my audiobooks a bit better. Last night I installed a wee powered sub, now music is pretty listenable too. The wiring situation under the dash is getting stupid, I actually bought some distribution blocks today so I can remove the splice upon splice of power wires that power the stereo/sub/egt/cb/etc etc. It's got to the point even I don't know what's powering what. The engine rattle is still there but seems not to be an issue, I'll run it till it blows up I guess. But overall I am super happy with it, it is so incredibly practical. Its probably the best thing I have ever built. PFT, here it tonight loaded up with shite;
    51 points
  29. Got the underseal done, used some tintable bed liner so it should be super durable. Came out so nice! Have been slowly assembling things that won't get in the way later. Installed a whole bunch of Kilmat pretty much everywhere I could. Once it's rollable again, going to try and take it in and get some new carpet installed throughout. Painted a bunch of stuff black this weekend. Not pictured is the sway bar, steering and control arms, steering rack and the new radiator support piece. Dropped the diff off to Geartech and they set it up properly and while they were at it swapped in the S15 6th gear into the J160. Need the front crossmember back from sandblasters, then that can be painted and put in. Also waiting on a bunch of new bushes and and zinc plating to be arrive before much more assembling can be done.
    51 points
  30. Well the last few days has been a bit emotional and busy. Did the last few tidy up jobs on the housetruck and added a few little features we had always intended to but never got around to (typical..) Main thing we added was a bit of decking on the roof. This serves a few purposes. The black butynol roofing gets fucking hot in summer, too hot to stand on. Not ideal for insulation or bare feet. It also gets a bit grubby = messy feet or shoes marking the floor or carpets. Plus the plywood roof is 12mm which is strong but still springy to walk on between the rafters. The decking is sat on runners above the rafters so now feels solid as. We got rid of the ugly old temporary pop out roof sheets of alloy that we'd put up after fixing the roofs and fitted new thicker shiny alloy with proper edgings. Also added gutters so now the rain wont run down the side of the popouts. So the last few days we emptied out all our stuff and moved it into the mezzanine or the cabin. Quite amazed at how much stuff we had collected and stashed away in the truck! Then a final clean up and moved the truck down into the yard. Ran it up hot and did an oil change. Took a few more pics of it. Here's one with Minky the Micra for scale... Then drove it to its new home. Luckily only 10 minutes away! We had to cut back loads of trees to get it down their driveway. The owners taking heaps of photos as we went. Finally parked it up... It wont stay in this spot for good. The young family that will be moving in are in isolation having just got back to NZ. In two weeks time I'll be popping round to run them through the ins and outs, packing it up for travel and setting it up etc. We'll go for a brief drive too so they can have a feel of what its like to drive. Then we'll set it up in its new home spot proper. But for now that's where it is. Hannah and I had a cup of tea and said bye bye to our reliable, comfortable, safe and cosy home of almost the last 9 years or so... Yes we are sad to see it go because its our home that we built. But also really excited because its another step in life. We can finish the mezzanine now, build a garage, do some other little projects but most exciting is we also get to build another housetruck! We left the truck went to the local cafe/bar and had a pint with local friends - where word throughout the village that we had sold the housetruck was already well out there. Suitably fizzed up on beer we walked home on a warm evening and discussed our next housetruck build... So that is this thread finished. Its been a great journey and I'm sure its entertained a fair few. I'm hoping its inspired many to try out this housing and lifestyle and also been a useful source of ideas, tips, designs and lessons for those who were already building or about to build a housetruck. I'll be back with another thread soon for what will be our 4th housetruck build (excluding a few vans along the way) As always we've learned loads of things and look forward to using the lessons learned and ideas gained for the next build We have both already been checking out the usual places for a suitable truck. Fun times! Alex
    51 points
  31. And that’s my last day on it, back to reality next week. brother still has a wee list of holes to fill but she’s bloody close! Diff back in, wheels on and rollin! rear valence almost dialled Hard to scale but that’s a big pile of cast-off Chrysler
    49 points
  32. Made a new parcel tray out of some 2mm aluminium and mounted some Pioneer TS-X8 box speakers on it. Also fitted the rear window, just waiting on some new chrome filler trim to arrive, hopefully it fits right. Straightened up the bumpers and bumper filler panels. The filler panels are originally covered in rubber and they had a few spots where they had formed rust bubbles underneath and just looked terrible, so stripped that all off and tidied up the steel panels. Made some mounts for the radiator. Need to get the engine in to see if there's clearance between the fan and engine before I finish mounting the shroud. Finally got the engine back from being built. Basically it's got big cams, CNC ported head, uprated valve springs, TRD headgasket, Toda cam gears, then just all the usual stuff to freshen it up. Will try and get some proper specs soon. Got the throttle body's and manifold vapour blasted and then went through and replaced all the zinc socket head capscrews that everyone seems to send with their aftermarket parts, with some nicer stainless button heads. Gave the gearbox a coat of silver metallic basecoat and then since it was getting some clearcoat sprayed over the top, I thought it'd be rude to not throw some metal flake in too. Need to decide on something cool to paint the cam covers in now!
    49 points
  33. Front crossmember and steering rack back in. Got one side of the suspension and brakes bolted in. Have pieced together a Wilwood Dynapro 4 pot brake upgrade with 250mm rotors. Just fits under my 13" wheels with a 12mm spacer. Got the fuel tank back from powder coating and bolted that up under the car. Has a 255lph Denso in-tank pump with a Holley HydraMat pickup mounted inside. Test fitted the wheels with the 12mm spacers on the front, when this was running I only had 6" wide wheels on the front, so it'll be interesting to see how the extra width fits. Cleaned up the side rear window rubbers and glass and chucked them back in. What a huge difference that makes to the whole look of the car!
    49 points
  34. Just in from alexandra.. drivers floor pan, tunnel section and more firewall patches.. By my calculations, that’s all the main fucking holes filled, we have a god damn shell again!! Still some hours of checking it over, finishing spot welds and the usual completion stuff then we wait for the repair certifier to give us an inspection appointment
    48 points
  35. Far out! November last year was the last time I had tinkered away on this project. Time flies!!! Well both Hannah and I have been pretty busy with various things like having to get the housetruck finished off and road legal for sale and with that gone we had to build a place to live. The mezzanine build took a fair whack of time. That's all pretty much done, well at least to a point that we can happily live up there. I started losing a feel for time over summer with all that going on. Then a Micra/March turned up. A simple, cheap run about while the Imp is off the road eh. Then another Micra... and another. Oh - so now these are projects are they? FFS. Oh hey...what's that? Is that a Bedford TK truck in the yard. But hang on.. you've already got 4 other vehicles to play with, not to mention the old 4wd Hiace van that's getting bit rusty around the edges. Well screw all them. I just needed to get my 'flat six fix' so I dug out all the bits that had been hibernating under the bench and had some fun piecing them together in a sort of organised fashion on the table... Now where does this bit go?.... After having some fun taking photos I stashed some of the parts like the heads, cam gear, pistons etc that I wont need for a while back under the bench until needed. I had to confront a mini stumbling block I had with the oil pump drive sprockets. There is one small sprocket that slides onto the hub of a larger one and needed to be fixed in place. My initial thoughts were to weld it but I was worried that it would warp and cup. I sized it up for possibly bolting it in place using small cap screws but there just wasn't enough room between the chain and the hub, even for small 4mm screws. Welding it was going to have to be. I would get some advice though beforehand. But first I wanted to add a very slight taper to the teeth so there would be no sharp square edges that could potentially catch and rub against the inside of the chain plates. 3 of the sprockets were easy enough to pop in the lathe and give them a tickle with a flap disc. But the smallest I had to whip up a little hub to clamp it on... Trying to take a photo with one hand while holding an angle grinder in the other... Then sitting in front of the fire and cleaning off any sharp edges... Now I had sprockets I was happy with I had to confront my welding issue. I popped over the hill and chatted to another engineer I know who has a lot more experience with welding of such things than me. He pretty much told me what I had already guessed and I decided to just go for it. But just to be sure I thought it prudent to machine up a fake sprocket and hub to see how they faired when welded. There was no cupping evident so I went ahead with the sprocket. First thing though was to heat both parts up gently. Not too hot. Just hot enough that I could touch them but not get burnt... This way the welding could be quick and light without a mass of steel sucking the heat. But not so hot that shrinkage could be an issue either. I used the little tig welding table I had built ages ago for more comfort when doing such jobs... I'm certainly not a super neat tig welder like some artists out there (and never will be with only having decent sight out of one eye so judging the distance can be an issue) so I was very happy with the result and super happy that nothing pulled.. With this part finished I could concentrate on the chain tensioner design. I had a few ideas and had amassed a few bits to tinker with.... Being that the chains are under constant load and only turning a pump the tensioners are really only needed to stop excessive slap. Nothing to do with timing changes like a cam chain. I had two Datsun A12 tensioners to try out but no matter how I arranged them they conflicted with each other and there was no room for mounting bolts where I needed them.. So I tried out some Mazda/ford 2.0 duratec tensioners and they show great promise... I will make mounting blocks to suit and knock this part of the build on the head! Then onto finishing the bellhousing Hopefully some more updates soon although we have also started pulling one of the Micras down for the big swapsie game but that is mainly Hannah's project so I can keep working on this as I can.
    48 points
  36. Got the front crossmember back from sandblasting. The bottom had a few scrapes and dents in it, so made up a skid pate type thing and welded that on. Also while I was there, added a bunch of stitch welds around the whole crossmember. Sprayed some 2k black over it and few other things. Slowly assembling a bunch of things. Diff with new seals and assembled back together and then lifted in to place. Hopefully one of the last lots of zinc plating back. The 4 round bits and top right brackets are for a front brake upgrade (two sets actually), just waiting for some longer wheel studs to arrive and that can be assembled.
    48 points
  37. That's the panelbeaters 99% done. Now to find a few hours to bolt all the front suspension back in and get it rolling again.
    48 points
  38. Cleaned it up. Stoked with how they turned out.
    47 points
  39. Finished up what I think was all the fabrication and welding on the body. So gave the inside a good clean, sand and then sprayed some epoxy primer down. Came out really nice and smooth! Scuffed back the bits that need to be nice as they aren't being covered up once the interior is back in; wheel wells, strut brace and the b to c pillars. Also went around all the seams and applied some seam sealer, matched to the factory look. Then it was ready to spray the base coat and clear on. Really happy with how it turned out, got all the visible bits nice and glossy! Got some basecoat matched to the brown colour of the dash and spayed some on the dash top piece. Sprayed some flattened 2k clear on top. Got the outside, underneath and engine bay mostly sanded back, hopefully done by next weekend so it can be epoxy primed. Not really too sure on what order to do things from now though. Would like to try and avoid having to mask it up multiple times and having to sand the whole thing in-between each process.
    47 points
  40. Ahhh man, big success today! I got the car together enough to go for a run up the road. There are some big holes in the firewall currently from aircon stuff. So it's open to the engine bay. And when you go full throttle the intake noise in the cabin is so friggen loud that I think I need ear plugs. All of the loom and sensors are working well, new intake manifold with flipped throttles worked out perfect with SCP10 cable. LSD is doing LSD things! No single wheel peels anymore! The new gearbox is a little notchy into 2nd gear but its much much better than the other one. It's all a big relief, gearbox issues are/were main thing I was afraid would go wrong at this stage. Also not a peep out of the alternator! no more squeals. Hallelujah. I took it to the weigh bridge again. 830kg with half a tank of gas. Happy with that! Still on the heavy ROH wheels. So it's looking good to getting somewhere near my 820kg target for drags etc once I've swapped wheels. Swapping drivers seat for a bucket seat would probably be next easy win for some weight savings. Maybe eat a few less pies? Nah. Lots of small jobs to finish off but pretty relieved to have no major issues at this stage.
    46 points
  41. Many years ago, about 14 years or so, I bought a car off a friend so I could learn to drive and get myself to work. It cost me $400 with reg and wof, and was awesome. That car was a 1976 Morris Marina 1.8 SUPER. It was green ("Spanish Olive"), and it was damn near immaculate at the time. The only issue was that it drank about as much oil as it did petrol and the second gear synchro was slow. I thrashed that for a while, but eventually the Japanese bug bit and I sold it when I picked up a dirt cheap N/A BFMR Familia. I sold it to a young kid who wanted it to learn in like I did, but it was soon sold again and as far as I know its been sitting in a barn since. Rego on hold, but probably a pile of dust. Being the complete sicko that I am, despite owning many cars, and bringing a few other classic Brits back from the dead, I've always pined for another Marina. Hell, my Wife tried to buy my old Marina back a few years ago, but that fell on its face for various reasons. I figured if I can't get the old green machine back, the next best thing would be to keep an eye out for the ultimate version, the coupe. Coupes are rare. Well, Marinas, in general, are rare thanks to the (misguided) unpopularity of them, but coupes are just something you never see. Before I went and looked at a wrecked Twin Carb (TC) coupe in a field over Xmas, I hadn't seen one in person. The coupe in the field I ended up passing on because of its location (middle of nowhere; expensive to get a truck to pick it up), and the fact someone had pinched the plates and tags from it (probably to rebirth another Marina that had a dead rego) and it couldn't legally be put on the road again. If it's still available I might end up buying it for parts, we'll see. Anyway, back to the story at hand. The other day I had a PM from a fellow Old School forum member that knew I was looking for a coupe, letting me know there was one just listed on Facebook Marketplace. Sure enough, there it was. That's the one and only photo on the listing (and it's not a TC), but that didn't matter to me. I got in touch with the seller and within an hour of being listed, we had agreed to a sale and it was mine. The next day seller sent me more photos showing the current condition. The worst bit (that the seller knows of), the rust in the sill And the AUS spec OHC 1750cc E-Series single carb power house. As the story goes, the sellers dad has had the car for years, and the father and son started to restore the car to former glory. Unfortunately, the father passed away and the car has been in limbo since. The seller was happy to hear that I intend on returning the car to the road and undertaking a restoration of sorts. It may not go back to completely original, but I'm not going to chop it up and hot rod it. I have no doubt the car will be a hell of a lot of work and a lot of money. The first job is to even get it here, as it's currently across the Cook Strait in Blenheim and I'm in Wellington. Not far as the crow flies, but a large body of water that can only be crossed by plane or boat blocks it. A truck is arranged to pick it up at the end of next week, and then I'll get to see what the heck I've got myself into. This particular car is a little interesting just in the fact that's its an NZ Built, Aus spec car, meaning it gets the E-Series Over Head Cam engine, instead of the A or B series pushrod engines the UK cars have, but also has various bits of local content such as brakes, suspension and interior. Decoding the VIN it appears to be a Deluxe spec, with the 4 speed manual. The plan is to sell the TVR to make space and money, get the Marina going and stopping, and then cut out the rust. New sill panels are available off Trademe, so will replace the whole sill, and cut out any other rust I find. Once its solid, going and stopping, then its just a case of taking it for a WOF inspection to see where I'm at. What happens after that depends if I can get hold of the TC in the field. Oh, did I mention the rego is on hold? Well, it is, and its been off the road for almost 25 years. This will be the oldest save of any I've had before. The cool thing is that the rego is super optimistic... Yeah, its a "Sports Car", just like the TVR. I dont think anyone has called a Marina that before. I've started collecting things that might be important, such as an original BLMC workshop manual, in original Marina branded binder Ideally, I'd love to get this on the road, tidy up the interior, repaint the exterior (original paint, which I think is Bold As Brass yellow, or a different colour...?) and then rebuild and fit the twin carb engine from the field car to it. I need to have the car in my hot little hands first and see what it needs and what it's missing. I could be over my head in rust issues yet, who knows. We'll see soon enough. Discuss here
    46 points
  42. right so, its all back together. but first, new clutch. its a niteparts designed unit which holds heaps of torque but drives like a normal car. this thing is huge. check out the friction plate on top of the Giken twin plate unit! 20210713_184945 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_184938 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-44-05 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_183646 by sheepers, on Flickr right so then i put the motor back in the car. had to mod the turbo dump pipe. also had to mod the intercooler piping by the throttle body to include a new larger blow off valve. other things done include all new pipe work to and from the turbo and all new hoses for the wastegate. im waiting on a new intercooler which should be here in a couple of weeks too. and tonight i took it for a drive round the block, so far so good. noo doortz though as it needs to be tuned with the new turbo. its booked on the dyno on the 6th of August. 2021-07-21_08-32-36 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-14 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-24 by sheepers, on Flickr
    46 points
  43. Ooooh its been over two months since I updated this thread. I have not touched this engine since stashing all the bits under the bench out of harms way, throwing a blanket over the main block on the bench and spending most of my time since then buying up many Micras, working on the housetruck and building the mezzanine floor in the shed. Oh and some of that paid work thing too because we do have a mortgage to pay. However - I still have a little bit of progress up my sleeve to report before we get up to real time. So I can do an update and hopefully soon I'll be back into working on the engine. I'm very much looking forward to moving in upstairs because I can whittle away on the project even easier. Well at least I think it'll work out like that? There's still a load of sawdust to create yet before we can move in though. So where I left off last time was in making the start of the adaptor plate/engine side of the bellhousing. I needed a flywheel to work out its depth, due in part because I am intending on using a concentric slave cylinder, one that was left over from the Ford Mundano that we had robbed ages ago for its engine to fit into the Viva wagon. I had a Subaru Leone 1800 ring gear to suit the gearbox. I needed a clutch setup to suit and started hunting a variety of places. I found a brand new subaru Leone clutch disc going cheap on trade me so I snapped that up pronto. Now a suitable pressure plate. I was just going to buy a Subaru item but had realised that it wouldn't have worked - hence my question to you all in the last update - but no one on here came forward. Someone on retro rides forum won the prize though and guessed the issue. Whilst out on a run, my head clear and thinking of things it suddenly dawned on me that the pressure plate tension straps would now be in compression due to the Hondas anti-clockwise rotation (or clockwise when looking at the pressure plate). Luckily there's loads of clutch components available for early Hondas with their anti clockwise engines and I ended up sourcing a new pressure plate from a mid 80s Honda accord/prelude that would fit the bill and suited the new subaru leone clutch disc I'd already bought. The pressure plate was cheap from Rockauto - turning up only 5 days after ordering. They always amaze me! Clutch sorted and sitting on the bench. I could now measure up and start on a flywheel. I had Dylan @ThePog draw up a cad file of what I wanted- the right diameter and pilot holes for the adaptor bolts. He suggested that I get them to leaser cut pilot holes for the pressure plate bolts while at it and this saved some time. Got my plate cut and picked it up from Dylan's - giving me another chance to marvel at his Dynafari. I first set it up and bored it out a 1/4 way through to fit perfectly onto my flywheel hub I had previously made (this hub also has the surface that the rear main seal run against)... I could then seat the flywheel onto the hub, clamp them down and drill right through into the hub. Drill out to tapping size, tap the hub holes, clearance the flywheel holes and finally countersink and spot face the flywheel holes to suit some fancy bolts I bought - these need to sit near flush with the flywheel surface to clear the clutch disc damper springs. Pics... Flywheel now bolted to its hub I set it up in the lathe for machining... Then gave it a skim. Checked it again, double checked it and then triple checked it. All good. I then machined the required step onto the face to suit the factory specs for the clutch. Next thing was to add the ring gear I add. Now this was a bit tricky because my lovely old Mitutoyo vernier calipers (one of the first tools I bought when starting my apprenticeship) were not big enough to measure that diameter. My old work place I did my time at had some lovely 600mm Mitutoyo calipers in a lovely wooden case. They were one of the treasured items of the tool room and I used to love using them. I had priced up some 600mm items from a variety of other brands but wayyyyy too expensive for me. I'll still keep looking because they'd be handy for many jobs. Might find some second hand. But that didn't help me when I wanted to do this flywheel now So I made an extension from some stainless I tigged together, replicating the end of my calipers. Taped in place securely and hey presto- I had a new updated tool. Never perfect like the real thing so I had to really triple check my measurements but managed to turn the flywheel down to give me just the right amount of interference fit I wanted from a shrink fit. Into the bench top oven the ring gear went, heated up and it dropped on to my machined step nicely. Cooled down and its not going anywhere. With that in place I rechecked it all and got the throw out on the flywheel down to about 3 or 4 thou. Super happy with that. My clutch kit now bolted on in place and I have something I can set my bellhousing depth to suit... I have added the required dowels and its all done. I'll get the flywheel, clutch and crank balanced together before assembly of the engine. So that will be the next update I think. Machining the spacers that will become part of the engine side of the bellhousing adaptor. Then I need to finish off making some chain tensioners to suit the oil pump drive chains. However I still have plenty of other jobs to do on the housetruck and the mezzanine. Those are a priority whereas this is just a fun little project. But I must mention that today whilst out on a bicycle ride we had about 50 various motorbikes pass us on part of a charity run. I spotted a bright metallic blue Goldwing 1500 go past and as it accelerated up the hill we were on it had that distinctive flat six exhaust note and just sounded superb! It certainly got me tingling and all I thought of was that sound coming from my Imp A good incentive!
    46 points
  44. While I was fabricating the roller, I visited a bunch of engineers in the region and found that no one had a lathe big enough to machine it. Bugger. After getting some quotes from further abroad that would have blown my entire budget by themselves (15-20k). I decided that I'd just build my own lathe.. I jumped onto Ebay and ordered the cheapest set of linear rails I could find, including the ball screw and bearing blocks. 3-4 weeks later I got set to mocking up the "lathe" using the compound slide from my Stanko mounted to some adapters. Spinning the roll by hand with the compound slide clamped to the linear rail, I took the first test cut. "Fuuck yeah, this'll work" I said.. It would have taken forever to machine the 3mm x 25mm weld bead off, but I remember once when @kpr mounted his angle grinder in the lathe to cut through some hardening on a set of axles from memory? (that image is burnt into my mind, probably thinking it might be a useful trick one day. cheers dude!) The grinder worked really well and made short work of it. Spinning the ball screw with a battery drill.
    45 points
  45. This chapter is called: I blew up my motor but shit that was good . So the VVTI issue. I realized that I would be able to get the front plate off the VVTI pulley, and then hopefully wiggle free the spring and the locking pin without removing anything else. Thankfully it worked! Then put that front plate on, and done. Then fire the motor up, advance the cam 5 degrees - success! The cam is moving, finally. Excellent. However - with more advance I ended up hitting valves into pistons - at around 20 degrees advance. Bummer! This motor must have smaller valve cutouts than the non hybrid engines I guess. I should have checked this, rookie mistake. So in some ways it was good that the locking pin was stuck, otherwise I probably would have done this on day one instead of lots of fun doorting around. It doesnt sound catastrophic, I dont think any valves have broken off. But the motor turns over like it's got no compression now. So probably tweaked the valve heads. But it's not crunchy sounding and it turns over freely. If anything I'm a little dissapointed that it's come to a fairly inglorious end, rather than sent to valhalla at 8800rpm blaze of glory. The options from here once the head is fixed or replaced: -Keep as is, run with no VVTI (boooo) -Cut bigger reliefs into the pistons so full VVTI can be used (hooray) but slightly less compression thanks to cutouts (boo) This all sounds like a bit of a downer, but my general mood right now is I'm fizzing about what an awesome success this all was. As a proof of concept, and a reasonably cheap project to keep me entertained this has been completely excellent. What I've learned is that there's no way I'm going to have the discipline to keep the revs on this motor below 8k when it loves to still rev up past that. So it would have been a matter of time until rods exited block. Also since I now know that I will have to remove pistons for machining some cutouts, I can replace rods at the same time with cheap stronger ones. This gearbox is a bit clunky and it could really do with an LSD. So while it's all apart for LSD install I can see if the shifter forks are a bit beaten up or something, and replace with parts from my old box which is buttery smooth to shift. So I've learned some stuff that would necessitate engine/box removal regardless. There will probably some slow progress for a while, but I'm super happy with how it's all come along. My goal is to get the car awesomely sorted for a December trackday and OS drags if they'll let me pest peoples eyes and ears with an Echo again. A++ would do hybrid motor doorts again
    44 points
  46. got the bumpers back from chroming. these pictures do absolutely no justice to how good it looks IRL. 2021-03-23_06-53-44 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-53-54 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-10 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-17 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-24 by sheepers, on Flickr
    44 points
  47. So the new joints arrived this time but they were packaged incorrectly and for a different car. Because the theme for this project is buy things at least twice I ordered some more of the 'correct' ones and am now waiting for those to arrive. I was bumbling around in the garage and looked at it and thought 'I wonder if the spindles and brakes fit the other way around ' as the mount holes for the balljoints are angled. Swapped side to side, did a bump steer check , that got it down to 13mm, it had what appeared to be a shit ton of caster and the top ball joint was getting close to binding, so adjusted the top arm a bit and rechecked it, down to 5mm now with camber and caster in the ballpark Other people are having xmas parties, I'm in my garage quite excited at improving my steering and suspension geometry, what a nerd
    44 points
  48. Bolting clean painted parts on with new bolts is satisfying
    44 points
  49. 4 months later and suddenly the grass starts growing at a rate my mowing cant keep up with, all the flowers are out, birds are singing madly. The bush has the most amazing fragrant scent - especially the Lemonwood trees which have amazing flowers. The Kanukas and Manukas will start flowering soon too. At night time, because the land is mainly hillside we can walk along the driveway and the smell is so strong coming down from the bush. We now have two Keas who have claimed our place as theirs in the last two weeks. They are getting closer to the truck and fuck I hope they dont discover its Butynol roof membrane or the nice new rubbers on my Imp. As awesome and comical as they are I do hope they get bored and piss off elsewhere. There's also some falcons about. Usually breeding up one of the gullies and this evening I watched one of them attacking a Hawk until it flew away. Its weird that they dont seem bothered by the Keas even though Keas will happily eat some meat (well mainly the fat that they like) We now have a resident Chaffinch called Chaffy and a Blackbird called ... Blackie. I know. Terrible. They hang about here all day with us. Each morning they call us and wait for their porridge scraps. Chaffy has become a comically fat little fucker. Properly round! I'll get a good photo- you'll laugh. He now has a mate (Mrs Chaffy.. please dont judge. It was an easy name) She is still a bit shy. We think they might have started nesting in one of the Kanuka trees next to the truck. Will be neat if we get baby Chafffinches (except for the bloody naming bit...). No other birds have seemed to have spotted the abundent food these 3 get each morning. Weird. It might be that Blackie does chase other birds away. But he's cool with Chaffy and they will spend all day together just pecking about the place, mates really. Its quite fun. Then we sold the housetruck and stuff started getting real busy here! (so its the perfect time to buy three Micras then.... ha) With the truck going end of next month we had to sort out a proper decent living arrangement pronto. We still have the cabin and that's a nice place to sleep. But to live out of for several months/maybe a year while we build another housetruck was going to get boring real quick. So we have been building the mezzanine in the workshop. Now I was going to post up the progress of that in the shed thread but since its more actually a sort of alternative house build that is going to take place it can stay here. Plus once the truck goes we have loads of other planned jobs to do about the yard. Terracing and landscaping the bank behind and above where the housetruck is parked, with a view to designing it around the next planned HT build. We are also going to get rid of the tin shed in the yard, put some concrete down and build a garage- big enough for the imp or Micra plus loads of old bicycles. Old bicycles that seem to be breeding around here (because N + 1) We also want to build a nice little funky glasshouse and landscape between there and the garage a cool chillout area because it gets the last of the yards sun in winter. Then there is the elephant in the room - the cabin on the ridge. Might actually start building the decking up there this summer now that the timber is up there. We've bought an 1800 litre tank for up there. That will be a fun day out.... Anyway- yeah busy. So the truck is now cof'd and but for a few tidy up jobs we can consider it gone. Better build some upstairs accommodation then. I had posted up a few pics in the shed thread so some of you will have already seen its beginnings - which involved a whole load of timber. A lot of it has come from our own land and was already milled, treated and stacked in the yard. We have been keeping it covered, stacked neatly on flitches and it was great to finally rip into using it. Most of our beams are from that pile. Then we sourced more local pine from a friends place around the corner from us. Finally we bought a load from a local sawmill up the Motueka valley including some lovely Macrocarpa. We ran it all through our thicknesser because it looks nicer and doesnt hold the dust like rough sawn timber does... (Also lots of nice shavings for the compost toilet too- although we dont use treated stuff in there) Bought a decent sized metal bender for a customers gate job a while back. Damn I wish I had one of these ages ago. Came in handy for parts of the steel feet for the posts.. The main mezz floor down one side went up and looked great. Finally our main plan for the workshop was happening! (its the reason we had gone for the highest knee height we could , in our budget).. Getting the hefty unwieldy 3.6m long 20mm strandfloor sheets up to the next level was made easier for us two when we had a hoist to use... With the flooring up on that side we had to build some stairs. We wanted to move the steel rack too so we could put up the posts for the second level over the entrance bay. Having that rack out of the way and moved further in would also make for easier entry with trucks (important really....) So off with all the steel and sorted through it.. Move the rack along, make new wooden shelves for the top so I could satisfy my inner ocd leanings and organise all the offcuts neatly... Then we had more steel delivered including a length of 100mm rhs for the stair design I had planned. Started building stairs... Finished the stair metal work, made some big Macrocarpa steps and while I painted the steel work Hannah painted the corner plywood a nice yellow... Then finally bolt the stairway in place and attach the wooden steps. Really happy with how they turned out. Solid as and with loads of space below to stash other annoying tools (shame really because its so neat without stuff under there but it is a bloody workshop after all...) Then clutter them up with stuff ... Now with some stairs we could fill the mezz with bikes... Better storage solutions will have to take place- we have some ideas involving skyhooks, ropes and pulleys. Stairs completed so we better start building the next level up down the front. This will be a posh carpeted lounge room where folk can gather to watch a movie from (gonna get a projector for the ceiling) or just listen to music/read/dote on cat. Kevin helped by keeping guard over his new favourite rug... We have put up the floor up there and its great. I'll get some pics tomorrow. Now we will start building walls and lining stuff out. Got heaps ofg nice pine and Rimu flooring to use for some wall lining. We want a sort of smart/rustic look to this whole build and it has to be practical because after we have finished living up there it will be used as a workspace for cleaner jobs and projects. Oh and hey there macho men - don't laugh but I actually fancy getting into some sewing and making my own clothes- I have always enjoyed sewing but its a pain to do anything decent when you don't have the clear room to lay stuff out. So that will be a thing. helloooooo Oh I must add- we are both genuinely very excited about a future model train build so we are planning things around that too ie walls with holes, where track might go. It wont be to the same amazing level as things like the Pendon model railway but hey- ya gotta start somewhere and this will be a good space to do so. It will run around the perimeter and not be dated to any particular age so we can different eras and so include model cars from the 60s through to now. I want to make a sci-fi type section with futuristic type buildings and monorail like stuff too. Dreams but gonna go for it
    44 points
  50. A whiles back I had a nice FD RX7 , and then I sold it, because of reasons. Always thought it was a silly thing to have done, so I have now un-done that decision... Sort of. FD's are in a bit of a bubble at the moment, with asking prices being sky high. It doesn't seem to me that many are actually selling at these inflated prices though... But, you can't argue that the prices on them are going up. I expect the bubble will burst at some stage and prices will fall to something more reasonable, but more than likely still more than I'd be willing to pay. I managed to do a deal with my former employer, High Performance Academy, (whom I still do work for on occasion, they're awesome guys ), to acquire this: They had purchased it to use for their tuning course, as a worked example on a rotary engine, but it just wasn't tidy enough, and would have taken too long to get there for their timeframe. They ended up purchasing the white FD I owned at the time, which was good to go for their needs. Towed it home (Christchurch) from Queenstown last night behind my 3.0TDI A4. Only a little dodgy... But actually towed with no problems. No scrubbing / scraping, and no weird handling, basically didn't know there was anything behind the car, except for the increased fuel usage and lack of usual grunt. Max slam. Spent this afternoon cleaning. So much dirt, bird shit and sap. The cover had blown off the rear corner, and because it was tucked away, no one noticed. Paint is a bit marked (it's had not completely shit re-spray in the original red), but it'll buff out. Plan for this is to tidy it up, replace the interior (most of it is thrashed), and get it going again on some factory(ish) twin turbos. I love the quirkyness of the sequential twins, and I know them inside and out (literally) from my time with my white car, so keeping those is a must. Most of the parts to put it back together are with the car. I'll be doing some hunting and scrounging for sure though. The wiring is roooooooted, but luckily I know a guy. This will probably take priority over the Starion, as it needs much less work, will be good to get it to a nice driver state. HMU if you've got a stash of parts! ;-).
    43 points
This leaderboard is set to Auckland/GMT+13:00
×
×
  • Create New...