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  1. Phew- been busy. Lots done = update time. But to save my sanity I might do it in two lots. So as per @GregT bit of information above I looked into motorbike oil pump chains and yeah- bugger all have tensioners and they actually run quite loose. I then decided to scrap the idea of spring loaded tensioners because even with the ones I had they were still a bit awkward to fit and didn't quite work in the angle I would have wanted. So enter stage left my new adjustable tensioner device... which fits like this... The bolts that clamp it down are actually accessible from below with the sump plate removed so once the chains wear to a point that I'm not happy with I can tension them independently. The will be nyloc nuts replacing those normal nuts on the tensioner bolts when the final assembly takes place. So with that finally finished I moved on down. The sump cover. It has to be fairly beefy because it could see some hits plus the engine will rest on it when on the bench. It has to be alloy so It can be used as a useful heat sink to pull heat from the oil. It has to look cool for when the Barries look under the car. So some fins were in order. I bought a big lump of alloy from Ulrich aluminium. That hurt. I put it through the old table saw and did some rough cuts just to save on time milling... Into the mill and did milly things. It was going to take bloody ages thought so I made a new tool which I shall call the DDC. 'Dewalt drill control' ... It could always be an MDC. Makita drill control. My cunning design is adaptable. In action... Groovy man... Then the sides taken down... I stopped there. The bit that is left unslotted will be machined to suit a recessed sump plug. I wont do any more until I finish the front cover below the cambelts where I'll also be adding some engine mount points. Next up was to finish the adaptor plate that connects the engine to the gearbox bellhousing. I had machined a bunch of pedestals to an exact length I had worked out to suit the positioning of the spigot shaft on the end of the first motion shaft into the spigot bearing. These pedestals have been machined on the gearbox end to locate within the dowel like spot faced bolt holes on the bellhousing. This way there was no chance of any float in any direction - the box would always be perfectly concentric to the engines crank and the bolts are really just clamping it. I bolted it all up together... Then cut some strips of 4mm alloy plate and started bending them to suit. Connecting the pedestals... Once I was happy with the fit up of those filler strips I ran a marker pen around them and took it all apart. Then cut the plate back to the lines in the bandsaw. Well I did so for a while but due to several things including the bandsaw having a totally rooted bearing collapse in the saws gearbox so making blade run off the driving wheel. plus the only course pitch blade having some missing teeth I ended up using the jigsaw. Anyway- got there in the end. Pieced it back together and it looked like this... Now time to weld it all together. I knew this was going to be tricky because the whole lot is like one huge heatsink and our current power cable to the workshop and the subsequent circuit breakers I have installed as a safety net wont allow me to run the welder at enough amps for such a mass of alloy - sit on 150 amps for any longer then 20 secs and it would trip. If I had a big enough oven I'd heat the whole lot up together nice and slowly. But I don't. So I just had to be strategic about it and work fast because once I stopped welding the heat soon dispersed. Luckily the welds just have to be strong and functional because it would all be smoothed down with a flap disc for a more factory casting look I wanted. It turned out good and best of all it hadn't warped so the box still fitted correctly and neatly. I was happy with that and it was now time to move on to the next stage which was the starter motor fitment. That will be in the next exciting instalment
    88 points
  2. painted. 2021-02-14_11-35-37 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-35-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-53 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-46 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-38 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-31 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-17 by sheepers, on Flickr
    81 points
  3. Starter motor time. I had bought a Subaru leone 1.8 starter from the fella I'd got the gearboxes and 1.8 ring gear from. Made sense to use all the same bits. Only thing I'd have to do was move the mounting face for the starter forwards towards the engine to suit the new ring gear position on my home made flywheel... Easy as I thought and I had it all planned out. I shall start at dawn! However that's not what happened once I got a friendly query from a fella about the starter motor turning the engine the wrong way. Oh yeah. Bugger. Of course it will do that. Yay. So after a few ideas and suggestions from various folk I had a few options. My first option was to mount the Subaru starter on the front of the bellhousing adaptor, facing backwards. Essentially turn it 180 degrees and it would spin the Honda engine in the required anti-clockwise direction I needed. But would it fit? Yes it does... It wouldn't be too tricky to mount and on extension the pinion almost lined up perfectly with the ring gear. It sat down in place quite low too. So this solution was a strong contender. But it had a couple of weaknesses that meant it went to the back burner. One: the ring gear would need turning around so the leads shaped into the teeth faced the pinion. Turning it round and having the pinion strike it from the opposite side then meant that the step I had machined into the flywheel would have been on the wrong side and the gear could potentially work off over time. I was reluctant about the idea I could add a few welds, as some folk will do, because it adds stress risers, could affect the balance. I really didn't want to muck about with the ring gear. Two: having a fairly large ugly starter motor plonked right there on the top of the motor was something I never had in my minds pictures of how I wanted the engine bay to look. It would be right where I might want some linkages for the itbs, possibly a centrally mounted plenum between the itbs and there was also going to be some water pipes around that area too. So back to the other options- the main one being to look for a suitable Honda starter that's mounted from the gearbox side or a starter from any standard clockwise rotating engine that mounts from the front. The pinion had to have the same pitch and ideally the same tooth count. I did some research and it seemed that all the Japanese cars of this era all shared the same pinion pitch and were all around the 9 or 10 teeth. This was handy indeed. Off to the wreckers then... I went through the various shelves of starters, starting with Honda and found a possible candidate within a couple of minutes. Feeling pretty satisfied with my find I still double checked the other shelves just in case there was something even better but eventually I was spotted skipping out of the door happy with my Honda Civic/accord starter. Back home I looked at my booty. Subaru one is on the left... They were so close but not close enough. The Honda item has a smaller diameter 'locating spigot' that centralises it in the hole on the mounting face of the bell housing. This was a better turnout than it being bigger than the hole though! I would machine the hole in the plate to suit the new starter, which I was going to have to do for the original plan using the Subaru one anyway. The holes for the starter mounting bolts, that go through the bell housing into the engine, were 5mm closer at about 115mm and they were also offset to one side, not in line with the starters centreline. This was handy though because I could then have separate bolts holding the bell housing and room to turn the Honda starter about its axis, having the solenoid positioned in the least obstructive way. A plan was forming in my head. I took some measurements, did some scribbles and it all looked like it should work ok... I had already bought a hefty bit of 12mm plate for the Subaru starter repositioning and luckily it was still going to work with the new starter. I swapped the 4 jaw chuck onto the lathe and set it up. Drilled a big hole... Bored the hole out to suit the Honda starter spigot... Marked and drilled holes to suit... Recessed and spot faced one of the holes for the bellhousing to the engine bolts that just happened to slightly clash with a bit of the starter casting. So I now had a plate that the starter fitted neatly into, with not a hint of slop. The bolt holes lined up perfectly with the bellhousing bolt holes so lining the starter up the correct distance out from the ring gear. Now I need to move the face of this plate closer to the engine... So I cut a big lump of alloy from the bellhousing with a grinder and a hacksaw... This allowed me to move the plate closer and let the pinion fully engage with the ring gear... I tested the fit of the starter... The height was good but I wanted it to be perfectly parallel to the face of the flywheel so I really had to mill it. Luckily I was just able to squeeze the gearbox into a position on the mill that allowed me to face it perfectly... I must have some pretty honed hacksaw skills because I only needed to skim off about .75mm to get it flat. Sweet. Now I bolted the plate in place, then the starter and tested it... Oh I forgot to mention that once I had decided I was going to use a starter mounted in the original position I popped a hole through the adaptor plate in line with the starter pinion. This was to allow me to check the pinion mesh... I was super happy with the mesh so I marked the excess on the plate to be trimmed off and gave it a hair cut in the bandsaw... I also milled out the back of the plate where it just clashed with the rivets and pressings on the outer edge clutch pressure plate. Bolted it back in and welded it up, taking lots of care to avoid any chance of movement or warping. It went well.. Added some little filler plates to tie it in neatly and gave it a tickle with a flap disc... Bolted the starter back in, stood back and admired it all, really happy that one of the trickier jobs had been completed and that the starter was sitting in there very neatly and tucked away nicely, no higher than the top of the bellhousing... Next step was to make a cover for the 'front' of the engine, adding a connecting link between the oil filter outlet and the main oil way into the engine, a filling point for the sump, a dipstick and allocations for engine mounts to suit a cross member. Still lots of work to do but I'm getting closer...
    77 points
  4. car went to the paint shop to get the runs out of it and get the final cut and polish. i went and picked it up last night and it looks amazing. anywho, today i wanted to fix the exhaust where the flex joint had worn through because its the lowest point and its had a fucking over judder bars and whatnot and subsequently has a hole it in. step 1 - jack up your car. this is where things went wrong. 2021-04-25_02-55-42 by sheepers, on Flickr car slid off the jack on the way up. given what could have happened i got off extremely lightly. it bent the radiator support up and bent the bottom of the radiator real bad. it also bent the bottom of the front bumper. however, the radiator isn't leaking and the crank pulley is unscathed which is a fucking miracle given what happened. i was able to bash the rad support back down and i got most of the bend out of the bumper so it looks fairly normal again. fuck it could have been WAY worse.................. so yea, after dealing with that i moved on to fixing the zorst. cut out the fucked bit, made a new bit, tacked it in place, remove zorst from car and fully weld, add 4mm thick bash plate and put zorst back in car. 2021-04-25_02-55-49 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-55-55 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-09 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-21 by sheepers, on Flickr then it was time to wax the newly polished paint. that went well. it looks pretty ace tbh and yea, i cant take a photo that justifies how good it looks. but it looks good. take my word for it. 2021-04-25_05-34-27 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-18-48 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-19-23 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-32-09 by sheepers, on Flickr
    75 points
  5. This is pretty much the finished car. I took it to Clint for a cert. It didn't fail on too much, just some additional fuel line clips needed, a smidge of camber to be wound in, heat sleeving on a brake line on the diff, some nyloc nuts for the seat bolts, and a couple of other very minor things. Anyway here's finally, some proper camera photos of it. 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (369)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (383)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (327)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (350) by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (356)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (311)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (294)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (403)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (58)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (66)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (83)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (48)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (160)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (175)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (238)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (263)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (440)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (408)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (306)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr 1981 Toyota Starlet KP61 4AGE (494)-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Thanks for looking, for the past 15 years or so.
    73 points
  6. Ohh yeah it worked!!!! One minor defect where one of the thin standoffs didnt vent. But thats a simple weld job. Other than that it went awesome! She was a pretty big job!
    72 points
  7. Dyno day. Glen beat on the poor old girl like a rented mule and it took it all like a champ. Only had one small issue with spark plug boots not being tight enough and it starting missing at high boost. That was easy fixed and it ended up making 460RWKW at 25psi. I still have a new intercooler to fit and then it'll get a new tune but it won't change much. If I thought it was frightening before I got a whole new level of violence to learn about. Graph shows old turbo tune and new turbo tune at both boost levels for each.
    71 points
  8. its coming along. im just tidying up all the little things that need doing. ive got some generic belt line rubbers coming for it then i can put the door cards back on. the bumpers are away being chromed and ill get them back in a week or so. not sold on the black center caps and i have another set on order should be here middle of next month. i drove it up the road to get some milk and i fucking love driving this thing, its fucking slow but its cool to just cruze along in and i can see myself doing a bunch of Ks in this as soon as i tidy u the last few things. believe it or not its still got a warrant! 2021-03-18_07-56-27 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-37 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-45 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-52 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-58 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-57-04 by sheepers, on Flickr
    68 points
  9. Back on the chain gang ! Yep. I'm back into this project. Its been a hectic busy last few months. Well for me, but others would probably laugh at my work levels. The last update was in September and both Hannah and I were pretty busy building a custom coffee cart for a customer. It was a fair old mission not helped by that pesky lockdown stalling a load of stuff ordered, including some double glazed window materials from Auckland. We put in some hard efforts to get the thing built and ready in time for the agreed date and managed it with a 2am finish on the last day before delivery. I was well chuffed with the cart we built and the customer is soooo happy with her new cafe ! All fully insulated, huge windows that roll away into the walls, loads of stainless benching and a lovely outside wood framing we made using Eucalyptus timber then oiled. Here's some pics of the build... Phew. Check that one off the whiteboard of jobs. Loads more work to chip through and we are now onto the steel framework for a local ladies housetruck. So I am going to do my best to just put down the tools, lock my bicycles away so I cant be tempted to just go riding and instead do more on this engine swap. Most recent bits I have done are as follows. I wanted to finish off the oil system. The internal stuff from the pick up to the pump and filter was sorted. Now I needed to get the oil from the filter to the engine. Luckily, well I kind of planned around it, there is a hole left where gear selector shaft went. This was ideal to pass a pipe back from the filter block outlet towards the front/belt end of the engine. But it needed to be bigger with some clearance. One big drill bit later... next up was a plate to cover the front. What used to be here was a cast front cover, much deeper obviously because I have lopped off a huge chunk of engine casing. It housed the oil filter, now moved to the side. Instead of that I now needed a flat plate of thick alloy that will serve several things. The engine mounts, most likely typical compression bobbins, will be mounted off it. There has to be a way to get the oil from the pipe coming from the filter block to head back into the main oil feed hole higher in the block. Finally I need somewhere to put oil into the engine and also to check the oil level. I started with a plate of alloy I roughly cut to size. Drilled it to suit the holes in the block that the old front cover mounted to. I then drilled a hole in it to suit the oil feed pipe. This was a hole perfectly located to make sure the pipe would line up with the filter transfer block nice and square. Because I'm using the O rings that Honda used throughout the original system. There is a small tolerance for being out of square with these but I might as well get it as close as I can. I then needed to make a bolt on block that would take the oil from this pipe end and direct it through another hole in the plate which locates right over another O ring sealed port into the engines main oil way, just as the original front cover did. I started with some more chunks of alloy and made a thousands of teeny tiny chunks of alloy with the tablesaw... One of the blocks was then milled out to suit the pipe outlet and oilway inlet sizes. I also used a tiny little slot drill to add a groove to help keep the sealant in place.. Flipped it over and took more material away. Added some cooling grooves. But really.. come on. They were more just so it looked a bit nicer than just being a lump of alloy. Why not.. Clamped it down onto the front plate and drilled mounting holes... There's a nice amount of room to still use the original honda cooling hose if I want but I may well do something else when I get to that bit- depends on my cross member design and engine mounts etc.. Next up was how to get oil in place! I needed a filler point. The original filler and dipstick are in the wrong spot and kind of chopped out. I could have made a dipstick to suit the now chopped down dipstick housing but that's at the rear/flywheel end of the engine. With the engine turned round 180 degrees that puts it under the parcel shelf and would mean reaching over what ever induction setup I use (cough*ITBS*cough) so that's not cricket. A filler tube, right at the front, but actually now the back, of the engine with a combined dipstick under the cap made more sense. I rummaged through my collection of alloy.. Playtime in the lathe... and out popped this... ..into which oil will pour as such.... Now I needed some more bits to hold it in the right place so I made these flanges to suit more pipe. Once I know what I'm doing with the cooling pipes etc I'll cut the pipe to suit and epoxy it into the flanges. I ideally need the main large flange to bolt over a hole below the oil level height - which I have roughly worked out allowing for about 4.5 litres thereabouts. This pipe and cap will be right there, on view, easy to get to at the engine bay opening. The two smaller flanges are so I can remove the upright pipe to allow for the cambelt covers to be removed, or so its not there liable for getting damaged when removing and moving the engine about. I did think about being super silly and adding a sight glass to the pipe. Or use some thin glass or plastic tube. I then even thought about being really silly and adding an led light into the pipe to light up the oil. But oil does not stay honey clean does it. So a neat little dipstick under the cap will do. Lastly I needed to bolt the sump cover in place. I had to think carefully about bolt placement for sealing purposes and get the bolts square. This sump plate is going to have to be sealed well because there is no usual high sided sump like most cars. Hence I built it rigid to help against flex. Good quality sealant will be the order of the day* To get the bolt holes square I had to do this... Impy sat outside looking in at his new heart being crafted (said like some car obsessed bloke who anthropomorphises his cars)... Well then. That's it. Crikey. Another wall of text. I hope you enjoyed my ramblings. I promise I'll put more effort into working on this (but it is summer after all..) *It will leak. Its a British car. Its destined to leak.
    66 points
  10. Had a bit of a cockup When I pulled the motor out of the white car and stored it, I put a rag in the dizzy hole to stop shit getting in there Being so long ago, I forgot how big it was I also forgot to remove it when I set the rockers It appears the oil pump drive went om nom nom on the rag . It was quite hard to get out and it was a bit chewed When I got it out there was one bit missing out of the rag that I could not find . I mucked around for ages with the vacuum down the dizzy hole and got a bit of fluff out I deemed getting the rag out to be an essential service so went to work and got my snake camera and grabby thing, found the offending bit of rag hiding in the sump next to the oil pump and did a doctor spec cottonectomy Phew
    66 points
  11. Made a bit of an overkill of a windscreen washer bottle that tucks in behind the front guard. Same for the radiator overflow. Windscreen back in and attached some new drip rail trim along with the stainless rain guards. Wiring of the body loom and Link ecu is pretty much done, other than a couple little things and the dash. Dash mostly back in. Made up a new base for the lower parcel shelf out of aluminium since the original cardboard one had seen better days. Made an alright spot to mount some relays and fuses. Waiting for some new door seals and then the doors can go back on. Hopefully get it started very soon, so it can go to the dyno and then get the upholstery/carpet done.
    65 points
  12. Next step in the puzzle was to sort out a clutch release system. I had a couple of options that could work. I could use the stock Subaru fork but it was not ideal for two reasons ; 1: It would need a the release bearing carrier adapting to take a larger diameter bearing that would suit the Honda pressure plate fingers. 2: Its pivot location, being a centre mounted fulcrum point, would require a slave cylinder that pushed it towards the front of the car. This is because originally the Leone the transmission came from uses a clutch cable. I'd being using a hydraulic slave and it would have to be mounted up high, over the engine. Probably clash with the underside of the parcel shelf and would definitely look ugly there. Option two was to use the Ford Mundano concentric slave cylinder I have had stashed away for ages, acquired with the Duratec engine I was going to fit into the Viva wagon many moons ago. This certainly seemed the most sensible option because it fitted into the location almost perfectly... The pipes even pop out through the Subaru release fork hole like it was made for it... But it was still going to require a little work. First off is that it has a flat bearing face, made to suit curved diaphragm spring ends. It was also too small in diameter to suit the fingers. So a lump of steel was plucked from the store... There was just enough room between the bearing face and the 'slidey hub' bit that the bearing hydraulics slide in and out on for me to machine a locating stub onto the bit of steel... With that being a perfect fitting locating point the other side was machined with a radialised face to suit the flat fingers. The end result looks like this.. This will be stuck in place onto the release bearing face with something like loctite 601. It cant go anywhere anyway. Next issue was fixing this whole unit in place and making sure its dead square to the input shaft centre line. Luckily the units bore was larger that the stub/shaft?* that the Subaru release bearing carrier slides on by about 2mm. It also so happened that when pushed on as far as it would go it allowed for just the right amount of movement of the release bearing, plus a bit to spare. So I machined a thin sleeve with a lip at one end to suit.. This I made a nice snug fit onto the stub/shaft thing and the Mundano assembly slides in place snug, thus making sure it all remains square. I assembled the lot together and checked it all with the transmission bolted in place. Looks good.. The initial throw of the release bearing will be adjusted at the pedal, which will now require me to either use the Mundano master cylinder (plastic..yuck) or machine/ sleeve my Imp one (actually the same as a landrover/most trailer brakes out there..) to suit. I'll look at that when I get to it. Next step is to bolt the assembly in place. The Leone box has splines cast in around the stub base... ..but luckily enough room between them to glue some blocks in place so I machined some alloy down to suit.. Because I knew the assembly was perfectly straight and in line I just needed to give enough clearance on the blocks to allow for some epoxy. I drilled and tapped the blocks to suit, mixed up some of my favourite JB weld and filled the chosen cavities then slide it back in place. Then let it set overnight.. The next day I tried the original Mundano rubber boot for the pipe exit. It almost fitted. I sliced 5mm out of its width and it was sorted. Not perfect looking but it works and cant be seen once the engine is in place anyway... Phew. Done. At this point I really did have a feeling like I had made it past the trickiest bits of the engine work required. But for some possible baffles around the oil pump pick up and maybe an anti surge plate (not that the Goldwing engine has any as stock) I think all the required mods to the engine are done. I felt like having a cold beer. So I did. Then pondered the next jobs to do. Which was to look at where I would run my cooling pipes and finalise the position of the oil filler tube.. In order to properly work through some routing ideas I had to plonk the heads back on. With them in place I might as well have some fun, bolt the transmission on and stand back with my beer and gaze at it all. I took some pics. I'm pretty bloody happy with it how it looks and I really did get a mojo boost looking at it sitting there as a complete unit waiting to go in... Its so neat and compact for a flat six.. Man I'm looking forward to having this setup in the back of my Imp! What's nice to think about is that while there's still a big load of work to do these next jobs will be super fun. I'm especially looking forward to making the ITB arrangement to suit and doing my best to create a really clean looking engine bay.
    64 points
  13. 20210129_194419-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Toyota Fest later this morning. Can't sleep. Too amped. Finishing touches to the detailing this evening, then I sat and looked at it for a bit. Man, I am super into this thing.
    64 points
  14. Did an awesome trade today. I now have a T57 crankshaft. Pretty lucky that it was less than 2hours away from me and the guy was awesome. Traded a bunch of my Lotus stuff + few $, he definitely did me a solid! Crankshaft from Engine #210 Rods from Engine #293
    63 points
  15. Painted the door window frames in 2k matte black and then assembled them back together. Hatch assembled and back on. Finally found some factory fender mirror, in pretty good condition too! Sanded the tail lights and sprayed them with some clearcoat. Got it off the rotisserie in the weekend, after being on it for 16 months!
    62 points
  16. IT RUNS!! The timing was out by 320° and then it started right up. Need to take it out to the dyno at some stage now and get it run in and a decent tune on it. https://www.instagram.com/p/CVw9xp3lLJu/ Got the dash all back in. Repinned the dash cluster plugs to suit the tacho dash (thanks to Paul for doing me a pin-out!). Fuel level warning light and the cat warning light are the only things that don't work because the car doesn't have them. Had to change the tacho signal resistor to get the gauge working from the Link ecu signal. Stoked it all works and even does the full sweep on ign! Bought some new door seals and lower window seals from Thailand and fitted them to the doors, so they could finally go back on. Made an oil catch can that tucks away under the intake. Drew up a front timing cover plug for where the original fwd engine mount use to stick out. Blocks up the hole nicely. Thanks to @Brennan for 3d printing it. Had the cam cover painted black (thanks Justin!). Looks good, but strange because I'm so used to the raw aluminium one.
    60 points
  17. Rightyo, I'm pretty damn excited about my recent purchase so thought I'd share it now, although the car isn't in my possession yet ... Longish sharn below; After selling my 323 wagon in January for (IMO) silly money, I was immediately on the look out for another car, this time preferably a rotary. An option of taking out a 5-10k loan was on the cards, giving me a max budget of around 20-25k. I'd looked at a few cars locally, rx7, rx323, rx626 etc. Either they weren't ticking the right boxes, or would have required more money to get them legal than my budget could stretch to. And from previous experiences around paying off a loan whilst owning an old car, it does get hard trying to either keep the car running whilst paying off the loan, let alone saving money for modifications etc. So I made the decision to not get a loan and keep within my actual budget. Nothing rotary in NZ was going to happen with sub 15k, well nothing that appealed to me anyways. So after reading through the importing from Japan thread and picking a few people's brains that have 'been there, done that'. I began searching Japanese sites for a car that I'd be happy with and contacted Stacked to act on my behalf, and to help with questions I had on particular cars and more information that I wanted from the sellers. https://oldschool.co.nz/index.php?/topic/55223-importing-from-japan/ I eventually narrowed the search down to 3 cars that were within my budget: 1979 mazda familia (323) wagon - still piston - still for sale actually if anyone was wanting to buy it, considering I sold my yellow rough one for almost 12k, this does seem like it could be worth while buying https://www.carsensor.net/usedcar/detail/CU5545473225/index.html?TRCD=200002&RESTID=CS210610 1981 Mazda Luce - not for sale anymore, but was 13B, automatic - luxury barge spec mazda 3rd option is the one I've pulled the trigger on and purchased - and just received confirmation today from Autohub that it's ready and waiting for shipping to NZ! 1985 Mazda Cosmo, 13B model, with, unfortunately an automatic gearbag. I only have the crap quality images below, but the car appears tidy, a little bit of rust in the doors, and thanks to one of @S124AB's contact in Japan, I was able to obtain some better quality pics which showed the underside of the car looking relatively clean and tidy. I priced up shipping, GST and a conservative compliance budget and this was affordable with no loan required. Anything rotary and manual seems to equal more dollars in Japan, so I'll live with the automatic for now. Plans will be; Get legal Lower Wheels Cruise and enjoy Save up for a manual swap, coilovers, cert, maybe engine porting of some sorts. Will update once the car arrives at my place. I'll either be really happy with the condition, or I'll be selling as parts lol
    59 points
  18. This showed up at home today - pretty happy with how tidy it is, certainly not mint, but I would have been shocked if it was. Flat battery, no engine coolant and a little exhaust leak will be the first little jobs to do, along with oil change and filters too. Chatted to a local compliance place that will do a pre compliance check over and point out any likely repairs needed, before doing a full on compliance inspection so will try get it to them in the next week or two
    59 points
  19. Those pics were shot for this. It was a compromised shoot, as it was during L4 lockdown and I'm not totally chuffed on the photo results but here we are. I'm a bit embarrassed about it, there's a handful of other cars in the issue that probably should have been cover, instead of a lower cost lower power KP Starlet. But buy it if you feel like you'd be interested in reading the story, I tried my best to get the point across that I didn't really do anything on this car, I just made a bunch of decisions and was lucky enough to have a small group of very talented friends who sacrificed their own time to help me put this thing together. 20211019_154109-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr So, 6-ish weeks ago I took this in to see @cletusfor it's cert as mentioned above, and have been working towards attaining this. Overall, the initial check went pretty well, and was a good example of why you should probbaly talk to your cert guy prior to undertaking any sort of project of magnitude. In the interests of transparency and maybe helping other people, it failed on the following: Tyre rub on all four corners (fitted the Star Brights for cert and they're just a shade too wide at 6.5J -2 with a 185) - new set of 14x6J -10 SSR Longchamps XR-4 fitted Skid plate required for modified or custom fuel tank as it's less than 200mm from the ground - sheeper helped out and we've knocked up a little skid plate to cover A few extra fuel and brake line clips required - ew yuck I had to drill holes for rivnuts Return spring required on brake pedal - small bracket made up to fit a spring that goes to a small hole drilled in brake pedal webbing 2 of the 6xM6 bolts in the Recaro bases were missing so needed to replace those - bolts installed Seat rails to floor adaptor M8 bolts required nyloc nuts in lieu of threaded plate - nuts installed Heatshielding required for fuel line on diff (close to exhaust at droop) - DEI heatshield sleeve added to the diff, really neat velcro-baced split sleeve that makes life easy Camber to be corrected to maximum of -1.5 degrees - realigned by old mate Kieran to comply Right rear shock just fouling on 4-link bracket - bracket clearanced with ye olde flapdisk and repainted Trim adjustable platform threads on diff to allow bump stop to contact properly - again, ye olde flapdisk came to the party Here she is on her cert feet which are yet to be restored and shinied up, I've also given my stock KP fender mirrors a lick of factory charcoal and reinstated these. 20211107_195603-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Recheck is tomorrow so wish me luck.
    58 points
  20. Discuss here Sharn incoming. Lots of words not many photos (yet). So, I'd been wanting to buy an Impala for a while and when the datsun popped up I thought it could be a good opportunity to make some money to put towards owning one. Unfortunately prices went crazy this year so it still seemed out of reach. As soon as it sold I put an ad up on one of the Facebook pages and I think I only got two responses. One was for a car way out of my budget and the other was a Bel Air in Wellington that looked rough. Anyway as time went on the Bel Air started to look like it could be worth looking at. I messaged @crustywhip and he was in the UK. Oh. No worries, if the guy still has it when Kane gets home we'll go from there. Thankfully the car wasn't actually advertised for sale so when it came time to revisit the idea it was still available. Kane had a look for me last week and determined that yes the body and interior is beat up but it is original and mechanicals are good. That was enough for me. Flight booked. "Hey m8. Have a 64 Belair if u interested? Have just put brand new mags on it also. Has NO RUST and has been through compliance etc when my m8 I brought it off had it. New body mounts and vtnz checked and wof also. Awesome tidy car and drives mint as! All original paint, carpets , seats etc etc so been untouched part from the wheels haha. It’s got a good 307 in it at the moment. My m8 had the bottom end checked by his mechanic and all tidy as. Only looking at selling to by a new vehicle for my new business otherwise I’d keep it 100% send u some pics" So anyway. Picked it up on Saturday and drove it home yesterday. It was tidier than I thought it would be and it drove well so I'm pretty stoked. I'll add some photos when I next drive it. Plans are to get rid of the 20"s asap and go to 14"s. Get some of the body tidied up (There's a gark down the right side and some dents in the roof I wouldn't mind disappearing). A new hoodlining, probably a stereo, and all going well hydros.
    56 points
  21. Took it to Keith Stewart to go on the dyno to be run in and get a tune put on it. Had zero issues, made 120.6hp atw. Will get some km's on it and take in back for a fine tune, should still have another 1000 or so rpm in it I'd imagine! Made an aluminium sump bash guard and that finished off everything on the underside. Couldn't find any good bumper end caps, so I drew one up in solidworks and my brother 3D printed out a couple to take some moulds off, so then we could make some fibreglass ones. Pretty happy with how they turned out! Far tidier than the old warped and cracked factory plastic ones. Had the bumpers, grill, headlight surrounds and fender mirrors painted in a metallic grey very close to the factory colour. Installed some NOS park/indicator lights that I got ages ago and put the bonnet on. That basically finishes off the exterior! Cert next!
    55 points
  22. Got some longer wheel studs for the front. Painted the hubs and installed some new genuine Toyota wheel bearings and seals. Have also changed the front springs to some shorter 5kg ones and added some keeper springs. Need to find some 100-130mm long 4kg springs for the rear, but they're proving hard to find. Painted the inside of the hatch, doors and bonnet. Finally managed to finish prepping the rest of the panels and took them into work this weekend. Had a bit of drama with the base coat being the wrong tint, as I had another 2 litres mixed up since there was only about 1-1.5 litres out of a 4 litre tin left after doing the body and didn't want to run out. Turned out the new mix was a bit darker, but managed to get 2 coats of that on and then one coat of the previous left overs sprayed on top. So hopefully it matches to the body! Stoked with how it turned out! I sprayed the basecoat and then my coworker Justin came and sprayed the clear on, so thanks to him for doing such a good job! Assembled a few bits today. Could just stare at this thing all day!
    55 points
  23. Yesterday afternoon I got to make use of the truck when we helped the neighbours do the hay. Every year we and a few other local farmers help them out with the hay and then we all get pissed and eat way more food than one should. Always a grand afternoon out Its been noted that flat deck farm utes suitable for hay are getting less common around these parts so they are super stoked we now have this truck...
    55 points
  24. Picked this up today - all complied, wof’d and reg’d. Very happy, about 4 months in NZ and on the road.
    54 points
  25. Finished and loaded up. Probably the most expensive and elaborate way to lower an El Camino! Looks like we'll see how good these bump stops are!
    54 points
  26. It's at the stage now where it looks like I've done fuck all Which is sort of true. Have been too busy to get a lot of time on it But have been chipping away at small jobs Carb rebuilt Alternator mounts made Throttle cable done Mod and painted the carb hat Calipers cleaned up and painted Radiator finished Hose shapes mocked up just have to find something that sort of fits Turbo oil drain 90% sorted just need a fitting for the block end Takes ages when everything needs blasting and painting and then it seems best to leave it for a week to harden properly
    54 points
  27. Got the underseal done, used some tintable bed liner so it should be super durable. Came out so nice! Have been slowly assembling things that won't get in the way later. Installed a whole bunch of Kilmat pretty much everywhere I could. Once it's rollable again, going to try and take it in and get some new carpet installed throughout. Painted a bunch of stuff black this weekend. Not pictured is the sway bar, steering and control arms, steering rack and the new radiator support piece. Dropped the diff off to Geartech and they set it up properly and while they were at it swapped in the S15 6th gear into the J160. Need the front crossmember back from sandblasters, then that can be painted and put in. Also waiting on a bunch of new bushes and and zinc plating to be arrive before much more assembling can be done.
    54 points
  28. yea right so i took this out for a good 5 hour long back road thrash. i dunno how to convey to you just how good this car is at hooning back roads, its fucking EPIC. fuck its amazing. i lose track of what this car is capable of when im just driving it to work and back every day, yea its fast and pulls like a fucking space rocket but thats only half the story. i suppose the best way to put it is that its got brakes, grip and stability to match every one of the 460kws the engine is making. and as a plus its now got better low end torque so you can just leave it in a higher gear and it will still come out of a corner like its been fired from a gun. im definitely in love with it all over again. 2021-12-11_03-04-09 by sheepers, on Flickr
    53 points
  29. Chassis update. My Dads been working away on this in his spare time. Many press tools, dies, hammering and probably injuries later a chassis rail is formed! Looks like the real deal! Pretty impressive. The other side should be a lot easier, so he says This is how you make a 40Ton backyard press to do some final tweaking.
    53 points
  30. Suspension partially done, 2" drop spindles, 3" lower springs in the front , and diff put on top of the springs in the back. I drew up a notch and got that laser cut, that's ready to pick up this week so next job is to whip the tray off and glue the notch in and make some shock mounts One of the front shocks fell apart when I took it out , that explains the rattle in the front suspension I'm not sure if the wheels will stay, one has started rusting already and its probably going to rub once the front bumpstops get a trim and the rear has some travel. So I'll probably put the stock wheels back on And waiting for some new front shocks I ordered a couple of weeks ago but I think covid has slowed that down
    53 points
  31. Made a new parcel tray out of some 2mm aluminium and mounted some Pioneer TS-X8 box speakers on it. Also fitted the rear window, just waiting on some new chrome filler trim to arrive, hopefully it fits right. Straightened up the bumpers and bumper filler panels. The filler panels are originally covered in rubber and they had a few spots where they had formed rust bubbles underneath and just looked terrible, so stripped that all off and tidied up the steel panels. Made some mounts for the radiator. Need to get the engine in to see if there's clearance between the fan and engine before I finish mounting the shroud. Finally got the engine back from being built. Basically it's got big cams, CNC ported head, uprated valve springs, TRD headgasket, Toda cam gears, then just all the usual stuff to freshen it up. Will try and get some proper specs soon. Got the throttle body's and manifold vapour blasted and then went through and replaced all the zinc socket head capscrews that everyone seems to send with their aftermarket parts, with some nicer stainless button heads. Gave the gearbox a coat of silver metallic basecoat and then since it was getting some clearcoat sprayed over the top, I thought it'd be rude to not throw some metal flake in too. Need to decide on something cool to paint the cam covers in now!
    53 points
  32. So it's been roughly 6 months and 5000kms, I thought I would do a situation report; It's fucking amazeballs. It's not stupidly big so I can use it as a daily no problem, although I do need to choose my parking spots a bit carefully. It's still big enough and industrial enough to make sure that merging like a zip is a given. It's actually really comfortable to drive, plus it's rock solid on the road. It will happily sit at 100 or so no problem. I'm getting on average 12.5l/100km, not amazing but not bad either. It is pretty lively off the mark so a reasonable balance. It takes a shitload of stuff. I put 45 sheets of 12mm ply on it the other day, 750 or 800kg, no problem. The deck is also big enough to take sizable items, it's way better than the townace for that. It's still quite noisy, I must find some vinyl and redo the floor with some deadening. I put some extra speakers on the dash that I got from the dump shop for $6, this helps me hear my audiobooks a bit better. Last night I installed a wee powered sub, now music is pretty listenable too. The wiring situation under the dash is getting stupid, I actually bought some distribution blocks today so I can remove the splice upon splice of power wires that power the stereo/sub/egt/cb/etc etc. It's got to the point even I don't know what's powering what. The engine rattle is still there but seems not to be an issue, I'll run it till it blows up I guess. But overall I am super happy with it, it is so incredibly practical. Its probably the best thing I have ever built. PFT, here it tonight loaded up with shite;
    52 points
  33. Well it didnt 100% work. But it could definitely be fixed with a welder! It didnt fill fast enough and there wasnt enough pressure. So they had to frantically fill from one of the riser holes to try save it. In doing that there is a big section of cold lap and a big hole! So the changes would be to have 2 filling sprues in the middle of the casting. Then increase the head pressure a little bit. The bowl I had in the sprue was way too big and reduced the head pressure. For the most part it looks pretty good. All the finer details are there. No cores collapsed or shifted, no shrinking of any areas so I dont need to worry about chill blocks. El Camino for scale. Going to have to figure out an easier way to do this in the shed. Was way too much work!
    52 points
  34. Front crossmember and steering rack back in. Got one side of the suspension and brakes bolted in. Have pieced together a Wilwood Dynapro 4 pot brake upgrade with 250mm rotors. Just fits under my 13" wheels with a 12mm spacer. Got the fuel tank back from powder coating and bolted that up under the car. Has a 255lph Denso in-tank pump with a Holley HydraMat pickup mounted inside. Test fitted the wheels with the 12mm spacers on the front, when this was running I only had 6" wide wheels on the front, so it'll be interesting to see how the extra width fits. Cleaned up the side rear window rubbers and glass and chucked them back in. What a huge difference that makes to the whole look of the car!
    51 points
  35. Got the front crossmember back from sandblasting. The bottom had a few scrapes and dents in it, so made up a skid pate type thing and welded that on. Also while I was there, added a bunch of stitch welds around the whole crossmember. Sprayed some 2k black over it and few other things. Slowly assembling a bunch of things. Diff with new seals and assembled back together and then lifted in to place. Hopefully one of the last lots of zinc plating back. The 4 round bits and top right brackets are for a front brake upgrade (two sets actually), just waiting for some longer wheel studs to arrive and that can be assembled.
    51 points
  36. And that’s my last day on it, back to reality next week. brother still has a wee list of holes to fill but she’s bloody close! Diff back in, wheels on and rollin! rear valence almost dialled Hard to scale but that’s a big pile of cast-off Chrysler
    50 points
  37. Cleaned it up. Stoked with how they turned out.
    50 points
  38. Rust aye? Am I right?! I found this little bubble of rust making party on the firewall next to the fuel reg. Awww noes The bit betwixt the firewall and this heater duct was chock full of factory seam sealer, it's pretty tricky to get to, so fair enough I guess. But all that seam sealer trapped water, leaves etc. So I cut it out and made a new duct by beating the living bejeezers out of it around some wood. Welded some more bits to it Removed all the old seam sealer & rust along the length of the scuttle. Welded and ground in the new duct. Seam sealed and painted. So lovely.
    49 points
  39. A while ago I purchased this beastie off Maxted (his build thread below for reference). th Since then it had mostly just sat in the garage while other things took up all the time. THEN Allan got a bit motivated during lockdown and spent a day lowering and putting my wheels on it Ahh, sooo much betterer! We have plans to take this to Napier in the coming weeks, so the race is on to get 'er done. Allan took it for a WOF last week and it had some taillight problems and leaking brake caliper. Top of the list they go!
    49 points
  40. right so, its all back together. but first, new clutch. its a niteparts designed unit which holds heaps of torque but drives like a normal car. this thing is huge. check out the friction plate on top of the Giken twin plate unit! 20210713_184945 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_184938 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-44-05 by sheepers, on Flickr 20210713_183646 by sheepers, on Flickr right so then i put the motor back in the car. had to mod the turbo dump pipe. also had to mod the intercooler piping by the throttle body to include a new larger blow off valve. other things done include all new pipe work to and from the turbo and all new hoses for the wastegate. im waiting on a new intercooler which should be here in a couple of weeks too. and tonight i took it for a drive round the block, so far so good. noo doortz though as it needs to be tuned with the new turbo. its booked on the dyno on the 6th of August. 2021-07-21_08-32-36 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-14 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-07-21_08-32-24 by sheepers, on Flickr
    49 points
  41. Far out! November last year was the last time I had tinkered away on this project. Time flies!!! Well both Hannah and I have been pretty busy with various things like having to get the housetruck finished off and road legal for sale and with that gone we had to build a place to live. The mezzanine build took a fair whack of time. That's all pretty much done, well at least to a point that we can happily live up there. I started losing a feel for time over summer with all that going on. Then a Micra/March turned up. A simple, cheap run about while the Imp is off the road eh. Then another Micra... and another. Oh - so now these are projects are they? FFS. Oh hey...what's that? Is that a Bedford TK truck in the yard. But hang on.. you've already got 4 other vehicles to play with, not to mention the old 4wd Hiace van that's getting bit rusty around the edges. Well screw all them. I just needed to get my 'flat six fix' so I dug out all the bits that had been hibernating under the bench and had some fun piecing them together in a sort of organised fashion on the table... Now where does this bit go?.... After having some fun taking photos I stashed some of the parts like the heads, cam gear, pistons etc that I wont need for a while back under the bench until needed. I had to confront a mini stumbling block I had with the oil pump drive sprockets. There is one small sprocket that slides onto the hub of a larger one and needed to be fixed in place. My initial thoughts were to weld it but I was worried that it would warp and cup. I sized it up for possibly bolting it in place using small cap screws but there just wasn't enough room between the chain and the hub, even for small 4mm screws. Welding it was going to have to be. I would get some advice though beforehand. But first I wanted to add a very slight taper to the teeth so there would be no sharp square edges that could potentially catch and rub against the inside of the chain plates. 3 of the sprockets were easy enough to pop in the lathe and give them a tickle with a flap disc. But the smallest I had to whip up a little hub to clamp it on... Trying to take a photo with one hand while holding an angle grinder in the other... Then sitting in front of the fire and cleaning off any sharp edges... Now I had sprockets I was happy with I had to confront my welding issue. I popped over the hill and chatted to another engineer I know who has a lot more experience with welding of such things than me. He pretty much told me what I had already guessed and I decided to just go for it. But just to be sure I thought it prudent to machine up a fake sprocket and hub to see how they faired when welded. There was no cupping evident so I went ahead with the sprocket. First thing though was to heat both parts up gently. Not too hot. Just hot enough that I could touch them but not get burnt... This way the welding could be quick and light without a mass of steel sucking the heat. But not so hot that shrinkage could be an issue either. I used the little tig welding table I had built ages ago for more comfort when doing such jobs... I'm certainly not a super neat tig welder like some artists out there (and never will be with only having decent sight out of one eye so judging the distance can be an issue) so I was very happy with the result and super happy that nothing pulled.. With this part finished I could concentrate on the chain tensioner design. I had a few ideas and had amassed a few bits to tinker with.... Being that the chains are under constant load and only turning a pump the tensioners are really only needed to stop excessive slap. Nothing to do with timing changes like a cam chain. I had two Datsun A12 tensioners to try out but no matter how I arranged them they conflicted with each other and there was no room for mounting bolts where I needed them.. So I tried out some Mazda/ford 2.0 duratec tensioners and they show great promise... I will make mounting blocks to suit and knock this part of the build on the head! Then onto finishing the bellhousing Hopefully some more updates soon although we have also started pulling one of the Micras down for the big swapsie game but that is mainly Hannah's project so I can keep working on this as I can.
    49 points
  42. Ahhh man, big success today! I got the car together enough to go for a run up the road. There are some big holes in the firewall currently from aircon stuff. So it's open to the engine bay. And when you go full throttle the intake noise in the cabin is so friggen loud that I think I need ear plugs. All of the loom and sensors are working well, new intake manifold with flipped throttles worked out perfect with SCP10 cable. LSD is doing LSD things! No single wheel peels anymore! The new gearbox is a little notchy into 2nd gear but its much much better than the other one. It's all a big relief, gearbox issues are/were main thing I was afraid would go wrong at this stage. Also not a peep out of the alternator! no more squeals. Hallelujah. I took it to the weigh bridge again. 830kg with half a tank of gas. Happy with that! Still on the heavy ROH wheels. So it's looking good to getting somewhere near my 820kg target for drags etc once I've swapped wheels. Swapping drivers seat for a bucket seat would probably be next easy win for some weight savings. Maybe eat a few less pies? Nah. Lots of small jobs to finish off but pretty relieved to have no major issues at this stage.
    48 points
  43. Just in from alexandra.. drivers floor pan, tunnel section and more firewall patches.. By my calculations, that’s all the main fucking holes filled, we have a god damn shell again!! Still some hours of checking it over, finishing spot welds and the usual completion stuff then we wait for the repair certifier to give us an inspection appointment
    48 points
  44. Still making progress on this thing. Have been a bit slack at taking detailed progress photos. Engine was dropped in a while ago. Radiator and overflow bottle finished up too. Fuel lines are done as well as the brake and clutch lines, they bleed up perfectly! Built the exhaust too. Went with a twin 2" stainless system and made the muffler as well. It's now fully welded and mounted properly. Swapped to the SSR MkII's Have put the original loom back in and hooked up most things again. Need to reroute the wiper motor plug, rewire the dash to suit the tacho cluster and redo all the wiring that runs through the front guards so it can be tucked away. Then I need to figure out how to wire up the engine with the Link ecu!
    48 points
  45. A whiles back I had a nice FD RX7 , and then I sold it, because of reasons. Always thought it was a silly thing to have done, so I have now un-done that decision... Sort of. FD's are in a bit of a bubble at the moment, with asking prices being sky high. It doesn't seem to me that many are actually selling at these inflated prices though... But, you can't argue that the prices on them are going up. I expect the bubble will burst at some stage and prices will fall to something more reasonable, but more than likely still more than I'd be willing to pay. I managed to do a deal with my former employer, High Performance Academy, (whom I still do work for on occasion, they're awesome guys ), to acquire this: They had purchased it to use for their tuning course, as a worked example on a rotary engine, but it just wasn't tidy enough, and would have taken too long to get there for their timeframe. They ended up purchasing the white FD I owned at the time, which was good to go for their needs. Towed it home (Christchurch) from Queenstown last night behind my 3.0TDI A4. Only a little dodgy... But actually towed with no problems. No scrubbing / scraping, and no weird handling, basically didn't know there was anything behind the car, except for the increased fuel usage and lack of usual grunt. Max slam. Spent this afternoon cleaning. So much dirt, bird shit and sap. The cover had blown off the rear corner, and because it was tucked away, no one noticed. Paint is a bit marked (it's had not completely shit re-spray in the original red), but it'll buff out. Plan for this is to tidy it up, replace the interior (most of it is thrashed), and get it going again on some factory(ish) twin turbos. I love the quirkyness of the sequential twins, and I know them inside and out (literally) from my time with my white car, so keeping those is a must. Most of the parts to put it back together are with the car. I'll be doing some hunting and scrounging for sure though. The wiring is roooooooted, but luckily I know a guy. This will probably take priority over the Starion, as it needs much less work, will be good to get it to a nice driver state. HMU if you've got a stash of parts! ;-).
    47 points
  46. Need a ute to carry moulds for the engine project. So I got a 67 El Camino. Picked it up in Tucson and drove it back to CA without too much stress. Has the original 327 with camel hump heads and a modern (/80s) 700r4 trans. Ton of things to sort to make it a daily. Like it doesnt run very well! Timing feels off or vac advance isnt working. Carb seems way too big. It looks good from a distance but dont let the fool you!
    47 points
  47. Many years ago, about 14 years or so, I bought a car off a friend so I could learn to drive and get myself to work. It cost me $400 with reg and wof, and was awesome. That car was a 1976 Morris Marina 1.8 SUPER. It was green ("Spanish Olive"), and it was damn near immaculate at the time. The only issue was that it drank about as much oil as it did petrol and the second gear synchro was slow. I thrashed that for a while, but eventually the Japanese bug bit and I sold it when I picked up a dirt cheap N/A BFMR Familia. I sold it to a young kid who wanted it to learn in like I did, but it was soon sold again and as far as I know its been sitting in a barn since. Rego on hold, but probably a pile of dust. Being the complete sicko that I am, despite owning many cars, and bringing a few other classic Brits back from the dead, I've always pined for another Marina. Hell, my Wife tried to buy my old Marina back a few years ago, but that fell on its face for various reasons. I figured if I can't get the old green machine back, the next best thing would be to keep an eye out for the ultimate version, the coupe. Coupes are rare. Well, Marinas, in general, are rare thanks to the (misguided) unpopularity of them, but coupes are just something you never see. Before I went and looked at a wrecked Twin Carb (TC) coupe in a field over Xmas, I hadn't seen one in person. The coupe in the field I ended up passing on because of its location (middle of nowhere; expensive to get a truck to pick it up), and the fact someone had pinched the plates and tags from it (probably to rebirth another Marina that had a dead rego) and it couldn't legally be put on the road again. If it's still available I might end up buying it for parts, we'll see. Anyway, back to the story at hand. The other day I had a PM from a fellow Old School forum member that knew I was looking for a coupe, letting me know there was one just listed on Facebook Marketplace. Sure enough, there it was. That's the one and only photo on the listing (and it's not a TC), but that didn't matter to me. I got in touch with the seller and within an hour of being listed, we had agreed to a sale and it was mine. The next day seller sent me more photos showing the current condition. The worst bit (that the seller knows of), the rust in the sill And the AUS spec OHC 1750cc E-Series single carb power house. As the story goes, the sellers dad has had the car for years, and the father and son started to restore the car to former glory. Unfortunately, the father passed away and the car has been in limbo since. The seller was happy to hear that I intend on returning the car to the road and undertaking a restoration of sorts. It may not go back to completely original, but I'm not going to chop it up and hot rod it. I have no doubt the car will be a hell of a lot of work and a lot of money. The first job is to even get it here, as it's currently across the Cook Strait in Blenheim and I'm in Wellington. Not far as the crow flies, but a large body of water that can only be crossed by plane or boat blocks it. A truck is arranged to pick it up at the end of next week, and then I'll get to see what the heck I've got myself into. This particular car is a little interesting just in the fact that's its an NZ Built, Aus spec car, meaning it gets the E-Series Over Head Cam engine, instead of the A or B series pushrod engines the UK cars have, but also has various bits of local content such as brakes, suspension and interior. Decoding the VIN it appears to be a Deluxe spec, with the 4 speed manual. The plan is to sell the TVR to make space and money, get the Marina going and stopping, and then cut out the rust. New sill panels are available off Trademe, so will replace the whole sill, and cut out any other rust I find. Once its solid, going and stopping, then its just a case of taking it for a WOF inspection to see where I'm at. What happens after that depends if I can get hold of the TC in the field. Oh, did I mention the rego is on hold? Well, it is, and its been off the road for almost 25 years. This will be the oldest save of any I've had before. The cool thing is that the rego is super optimistic... Yeah, its a "Sports Car", just like the TVR. I dont think anyone has called a Marina that before. I've started collecting things that might be important, such as an original BLMC workshop manual, in original Marina branded binder Ideally, I'd love to get this on the road, tidy up the interior, repaint the exterior (original paint, which I think is Bold As Brass yellow, or a different colour...?) and then rebuild and fit the twin carb engine from the field car to it. I need to have the car in my hot little hands first and see what it needs and what it's missing. I could be over my head in rust issues yet, who knows. We'll see soon enough. Discuss here
    47 points
  48. Fuck yes- after something like 9 1/2 years its finally got some colour on it, just a home job in the garage, but it's not seen so thought I'd just hit it. Majorly stoked
    47 points
  49. Fenders Painted and Fitted Up. Fitted up a moon disc to the alloy wheel too. And the Painted peaked bonnet.
    47 points
  50. Some updates. Waikumete upholsteres made a carpet for me. 2 pieces, like original, and we found a loop pile in maroon! Which was brilliant, as I really wanted a loop pile for that more premium appearance. 20210321_161234 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 20210321_165710 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I think it turned out pretty well! Did the boot also, but I haven't got a pic of that for some reason. 20210408_210246 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Engine and gearbox came out again. This is minutes before it all lifted out. Very easy. 20210417_114901 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Pulled apart the gearbox with great guidance from Earle McFarlane. 20210417_121227 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Measured all the clearances, then pulled it apart. Selector hubs are a bit pwnt, there is excessive wear in the shift forks, bearings seem all right but they're all being replaced anyway with all those parts in the post above. So now the mainshaft has been assembled (in my absence) and we are just waiting on the forks to come in from Japanland so we can reassemble. 20210330_125040 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Since the motor was coming out anyway I thought it'd be a good time to get the top end sorted, as it's only ever been a stock head and cams, despite the bottom end being built/hi comp. This is a spare smallport head that I spent a while scrubbing in the shed to get clean. 20210330_125016 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I then thought I'd try cold jet/dry ice blasting as a bit of a test case on the cam boxes to remove the baked on sludge and scum. This is the result. Pretty awesome! I'm going to be using this process to clean some of the undercarriage parts in situ on the Honda. 20210331_084622 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I stripped the head myself, once I learned how to remove the collets from the retainers it was all pretty simple. Here's the head, with all the bits catalogued and in containers, with the Kelford 193B cams and Supertech retainers/springs I bought ages ago for it. It's in with Alan Harris at Harris Performance Engineering (previous Lynn Rogers) for porting, some tickles on the combustion chamber and a port match of the ITB manifold. I then got to thinking about what audio this car is going to have, even if you can't hear anything inside it really. Initially, I was going to run a modern Bluetooth head unit in the glovebox, and got as far as buying this pretty rad Sony unit that has 50wrms per channel - from a head deck!!! Enough to power anything, speaker wise. But then Ed sent me a link to a Yahoo auction that changed things. 20210422_172330-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 20210422_172308-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is an AD-189T fitting kit/adapter produced by Pioneer in the early 80s. It fits a 'B' type head unit, which is conveniently what the 'component' systems of the early/mid 1980s are. Before the standard DIN size we all know and love today. It replaces an entire middle panel on the dash, replicating the OEM fit where normally there would be a spindle mount head unit (as is the case on my factory dash). I had never, ever seen even a picture of one of these kits before, let alone a NOS one on Yahoo. So I bid on it, because who doesn't love period accessories. And I won it. So then I thought I'd probably better find a head unit to fit. 20210422_172407-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I ended up with this Pioneer KP-717G tape deck. Note - it's a tape deck only, there is no AM/FM radio or anything with this, as was the style of the component systems of the time. This one was listed with a clean bill of health, and some remedial work done to ensure it was operational. The auction was backed up with a video to prove it. It's one of the higher end units in this range, with Dolby NR, adjustable tone controls, all the fruit. It doesn't have an amp on board - luckily Ed has one of the Pioneer GM-4 amps for this to plug into, that will find it's way into my car. 20210422_172454-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is how it should look when installed in the car, using the AD-189T kit. Fuckin. Awesome. I reckon. 20210422_172612-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 20210422_172638-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr And this is essentially what the initial system I run will be. Later on I may add some fronts - I have some NOS Pioneer TS167 coaxials, and also dual cones whose code escapes me right now. These TS-X9 are incredible though - I had them wired up to my amp in the house and they produce enough bass you can actually feel it through the floor. How they achieve it, I do not know. Sure it's not sub levels, but it's a beautifully balanced sound that I hope will be loud enough to listen to while pootling along at slow speeds or stuck in traffic. Thank you for coming to my TED talk. Hopefully, next updates will include a rowdy cylinder head, a slick shifting T50 and some Phil Collins tapes in the KP-717G.
    46 points
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