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  1. painted. 2021-02-14_11-35-37 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-35-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-53 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-46 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-38 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-31 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-02-14_11-34-17 by sheepers, on Flickr
    81 points
  2. car went to the paint shop to get the runs out of it and get the final cut and polish. i went and picked it up last night and it looks amazing. anywho, today i wanted to fix the exhaust where the flex joint had worn through because its the lowest point and its had a fucking over judder bars and whatnot and subsequently has a hole it in. step 1 - jack up your car. this is where things went wrong. 2021-04-25_02-55-42 by sheepers, on Flickr car slid off the jack on the way up. given what could have happened i got off extremely lightly. it bent the radiator support up and bent the bottom of the radiator real bad. it also bent the bottom of the front bumper. however, the radiator isn't leaking and the crank pulley is unscathed which is a fucking miracle given what happened. i was able to bash the rad support back down and i got most of the bend out of the bumper so it looks fairly normal again. fuck it could have been WAY worse.................. so yea, after dealing with that i moved on to fixing the zorst. cut out the fucked bit, made a new bit, tacked it in place, remove zorst from car and fully weld, add 4mm thick bash plate and put zorst back in car. 2021-04-25_02-55-49 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-55-55 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-09 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_02-56-21 by sheepers, on Flickr then it was time to wax the newly polished paint. that went well. it looks pretty ace tbh and yea, i cant take a photo that justifies how good it looks. but it looks good. take my word for it. 2021-04-25_05-34-27 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-18-48 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-19-23 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-04-25_06-32-09 by sheepers, on Flickr
    74 points
  3. Here we go then with another sporadic update. So, encouraged by a few people I have been putting in a little bit of effort on this in an attempt to get it to Toyota Festival, later this month. Nick the Sparky and I put in a couple of days in the shed at his place, where he did sparky things, I occasionally helped with sparky things, but I also stripped the old interior and put the new bits in. From there, I took the car to @sheepers, and he did some choice stuff for me which included a driveshaft loop, and mounting the freshly retrimmed Recaro LX (Fishnet) seats. Also while it was there I drained the synthetic (wrong) oil from the gearbox and put the right (mineral) stuff back in it, as it was giving me some strife. More on that soon. Lewis Horrell in Ashburton is responsible for the killer retrim. I wanted to match the seats to the plastics, and he managed to find a stunning option. We'd been talking about this for a long time - I wanted either a houndstooth or a tartan to channel both early Porsches (which I adore), and also the period the KP was designed in. I reckon it turned out all right. The gearbox has some shifting problems on the downshift from 4th to 3rd and 3rd to 2nd - initially we suspected clutch drag and maybe a mismatch of master cylinder to clutch cylinder, but after Davo's old man Earle dropped in and helped me through a few checks (he's a real T50-whisperer) his diagnosis is something in the selector or synchro area - so it's gonna be a gearbox out job shortly, nevermind. However, I will still be getting the car onto the dyno with @kpr and @Stu at some stage in the next couple of weeks, as we can hook 4th with no problem do the doort things! Pictures below: 20210110_181421-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Grabbing some sun after a full day of work. 20210110_181852-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is pretty much the final version of the engine bay, I haven't clipped the loom along the sides of the block yet, but it should be all sorted out post-dyno. 20210110_180317-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Got the dash back in for the first time in 5 years. Some plastic repairs on broken parts mean it is now secured better than it ever has been in my ownership of the car. The fake brushed ally of the factory dash has been re-overlaid with a textured vinyl. 20210110_172923-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr The Stack bits all lit up. Tach output isn't turned on in the Link yet, and we are struggling to get a useful signal for the speedo. But shouldn't be too tricky to solve, just need some advice from some experts and Nick reckons we can make it tell the speed! 20210110_180414-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr' Recaro LX in sumptuous maroon, with matching door cards (new CNC cut from 3mm tempered hardboard) 20210110_182113-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Absolute must to have the RECARO logo embroidered on in the proper location. 20210110_182416-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Imagine having rears that match? Well, you don't have to, because they match! 20210110_183559-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Wilwoods peeking through the Star Brights. It stops well, and it's only going to get better! 20210110_182557-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Top down! You can see the interior and the engine bay, I'm pretty stoked on this to be honest. It has come together better than I could have ever imagined ten years ago, when I pulled it all to pieces. As you can probably tell there's still plenty to do, like carpets and stuff. But the list is signficantly smaller, and there is no way I could have done this myself - I owe so much of this to a handful of really generous (especially with their time) and talented people I probably don't give enough dues. So thanks, if you're reading.
    70 points
  4. its coming along. im just tidying up all the little things that need doing. ive got some generic belt line rubbers coming for it then i can put the door cards back on. the bumpers are away being chromed and ill get them back in a week or so. not sold on the black center caps and i have another set on order should be here middle of next month. i drove it up the road to get some milk and i fucking love driving this thing, its fucking slow but its cool to just cruze along in and i can see myself doing a bunch of Ks in this as soon as i tidy u the last few things. believe it or not its still got a warrant! 2021-03-18_07-56-27 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-37 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-45 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-52 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-56-58 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-18_07-57-04 by sheepers, on Flickr
    68 points
  5. So over the last few days we have been tinkering away. Its neat sized truck that fits into the workshop nicely. Will be good when it comes to building the new deck and then the steel framework for the house later on. Our hoist is rated to lift 4 tonne so technically it could lift this truck. However I see that 4 tonne as a Chinese 4 tonne and don't really trust its actually a proper 4 tonne. I think I'll pass .. Anyway- old truck in workshop = nice... The first job to do was pull out all of the interior. Rats had obviously found it a nice cosy place to stay in so it all needed to go. Plus Wayne had to fit another seat to get it through a cof because the old one was so shot and had metal showing- now a test failure. But the Marina seat he fitted sat me too high. Luckily there was a good seat in the spares truck. I think Wayne must have had a go at removing that from the spares truck but two seized bolts had stopped him. We however had luckily brought out our cordless angle grinder on the day of pick up- always a handy tool to have about. So we managed to cut the bolts and free the seat. It cleaned up nicely and sat much lower. Next item was the throttle pedal assembly. The original beford item of rods and linkages was horrid and like mentioned earlier meant your foot had to stand almost upright and was really uncomfortable. We popped to the local wreckers and looked through the toyota vans there- I knew that one like in our hiace van could work a treat. We nabbed a setup from a super custom hiace and also grabbed a rubber gear lever boot from a mazda ute (because the bedford one was an old ripped vinyl thing that needed to be replaced). Plus a brake servo from the same ute for a future job on the TK. Hannah then removed all of the throttle pedal and linkage assembly. Youu can see the difference between the hiace item vs the bedford stuff below... I made a plate bolt the hiace pedal to and welded it onto the A piller.. The cable was luckily just long enough. The bracket to take the cable outer was in the wrong place so that I adapted... And all in place working... While I was finishing this Hannah set to removing the old dog box. It had to go because I wanted to move the batteries. The truck was converted to 24v to suit the Nissan engine. They added another battery and cradle to suit but it all takes up space right where you want to stand to have access on the passenger side of the engine bay... So Hannah ended up on the ground having fun with old seized bolts and rusty steel... I started dealing to the seating arrangement on the passenger side. The KM cab was designed around a much taller engine I think. There was no double seat, instead a removable access hatch I guess so you could adjust the front most tappets etc. This meant our double seat taken from the parts truck wouldnt fit. So I cut out the tunnel bit and altered things... Made a new lid to suit, keeping it removable because access there could always be handy... Made a new bit to suit the new gear stick rubber gaitor too. Painted it all... Fitted it back in complete with a nice old gear knob that originally came from a 60s Foden truck in the UK and then found a place in my V6 Viva. I kept it when I sold that Viva and now its got a home in the Bedford. I had to tap the threads out to suit. Spot the gear knob that was fitted previously - I guess a safari item? Could be anything but I think the new one looks more in keeping... While I was playing with my knob Hannah set to work on her rim (of the cab..) She dug out all the lifting seam sealer and can up some light surface rust and then painted the lot with Por 15. This will hold it until full paint later on. Luckily as the truck had mainly been stored inside it was in great condition around the roofline. I welded up the hole left when we removed the aerial. No room for an aerial sticking up there when there will soon be a bedroom floor residing there instead... Sort of up to date now. Thanks to the powers of social media I got this lovely response from a fella on the book of faces NZ Bedford group about our new project... "This truck is very special to us and loved driving this ole girl a few times during the hay making season.It originally belonged to my late father in law Cyril Higgins. Since his passing my brother in law Wayne has taken over the grand ole girl. If only she could talk. This truck has many happy memories for both my wife Jen ( Wayne's sis) and I on the farm. Loved seeing it go up Spooner range driven by my brother with pedal to the metal lol then cruze thru the Motupiko/Korere valley to feed out / check stock on the back country farm etc as they would do on a very regular basis. Would hope you get as much fun and enjoyment out it as we have. Would love to become part of your progress trail blog if you would be kind enough to include us please. Will post some photos up of the ole girl for as we come across them . Those were great days for us as we are sure they will be great days and memories ahead for you and your family..... Jen & Den " Den also posted up some cool pics of the truck in action... This is super cool and really made our day when we got that message. Den is now following the build here on Oldschool so we better do a worthy job I'm just loving the bit of history you can get with an old truck like this- makes it all the more fun to restore.
    67 points
  6. Hannah and I have been looking for a suitable truck to build another house on since selling the Hino. We wanted something a bit smaller than the 5 m wheelbase we had been used to. A bit more of a manageable size for little holidays plus the new house is to be removable so the truck can be used for work/play. We'd been looking at a variety of different trucks- some ex-fire service, some at a local wreckers. We'd been offered another Hino at an OK price and it was a 4m wheelbase. Then a couple of weeks ago Damian @dmulally asked me if I could look over a Bedford TK listed on the book of faces that was local to us. No worries. I like looking at old trucks and it was a good excuse to go for a hoon in the Imp. Here's a couple of pics I took that morning of the viewing.. Upon viewing we promptly fell in love with it and since Damian wanted a tipper, which this wasn't, he very kindly let us have first refusal on his find. But we did had to have a little think about it... At 3m the wheelbase was far shorter than what I have been planning the next house build on. I re-did some drawings and we sussed out some ideas. Deciding that with our mezzanine build giving us a huge amount of living space we realised we didn't need a massive housetruck. Also the idea of utilising some decent sized pop outs excited my designing itch. Other bonus points for the fact the little truck would be so easy to move about the yard plus in and out from under the planned 'house on stilts' , the fact it was a proper classic, a model Hannah had owned for many years and we both lived in while in the UK. Its rated at 6.5 ton with a current tare weight of 2.8. Ample allowance for a small house build plus its in a cheaper RUC bracket! The fact the truck had a really neat bit of history and was a one family owned truck from new with the seller, Wayne, being a very friendly bloke who really loved his old truck. It had been bought new by his Grandad and then his dad used it eventually being passed onto Wayne when his Dad died. It was still being used to run out the hay etc and is pretty much always kept road legal. The cab had been swapped in the 90s after an electrical fire had damaged the old cab beyond repair. The new cab was off a larger engined bigger KM model Bedford- hence the different grill and lights as fitted at the factory for those models. They had the Nissan safari/civilian engine fitted in the early 2000s after the 4 cylinder Isuzu went pop. They wanted a much smoother 6 and loved this conversion. A rust free cab, decent history and fitted with a 4.2 Nissan Diesel engine, all road legal for 5k. Bugger it- lets just do it! Last weekend we went back to collect the truck. It has been garaged most of its life... Currently sharing a shed with a very cool old tractor.. While we were there we got a nice tour from Wayne of the old seed thrashing machines his Dad had installed in around 1965 or thereabouts. They all still work and he showed us some of them running... While we were out there Wayne let us nab a few spares from the old TK he had in a field. Some seats in better condition and some standard TK single headlights in case we decide to swap it back that style (although growing to like the twins..) Said our goodbyes and promised to stay in touch as Wayne is interested in what becomes of his little truck. I drove it home, soon remembering how low the windscreen top is for tall folk. The seat that Wayne had fitted to see it through more recent cofs is from a Morris marina and sits too high. That will be fixed asap I thought. The throttle pedal was an awful design and sat almost vertical at idle. Tricky to moderate and my ankle had to contort heaps making the drive uncomfortable. But otherwise it all went well. The engine seemed fine and pulled well up the hills on the way home, even seeming a bit faster than our van. No doubt things will slow down with a house on board - but folk should never race about in their houses now should they... That evening we popped down to the beach and the doc carpark so Hannah could take it for a hoon. I took some pics... Once home again we parked it in front of the shed and started planning out a few tidy up jobs and modifications to make it nicer to drive. More on that soon
    65 points
  7. Chassis Update: My Dads been working away on this when he has a spare minute. Been making various press tools and working out a process. Starting to look like a chassis rail! Not the easiest way of doing it but definitely the most authentic! Also if anyone needs a clock or a barometer restored hes your go to. As long as it doesnt take away chassis building time!
    64 points
  8. Did an awesome trade today. I now have a T57 crankshaft. Pretty lucky that it was less than 2hours away from me and the guy was awesome. Traded a bunch of my Lotus stuff + few $, he definitely did me a solid! Crankshaft from Engine #210 Rods from Engine #293
    63 points
  9. 20210129_194419-Edit by Richard Opie, on Flickr Toyota Fest later this morning. Can't sleep. Too amped. Finishing touches to the detailing this evening, then I sat and looked at it for a bit. Man, I am super into this thing.
    61 points
  10. 2020-10-20_08-24-38 by sheepers, on Flickr 2020-10-20_08-24-30 by sheepers, on Flickr 2020-10-20_08-24-21 by sheepers, on Flickr 2020-10-20_08-24-08 by sheepers, on Flickr
    61 points
  11. Painted the door window frames in 2k matte black and then assembled them back together. Hatch assembled and back on. Finally found some factory fender mirror, in pretty good condition too! Sanded the tail lights and sprayed them with some clearcoat. Got it off the rotisserie in the weekend, after being on it for 16 months!
    59 points
  12. " Shimano? " you say... Well its not really that exciting. Please don't expect a Heath Robinson like contraption using XTR derailleurs, in the lovely pewter colour that the 965 series came in. Or better yet - some mint deore XT thumbshifters used as tensioners. Oh yes- the bike geek is strong in this one! But I'm jumping ahead again. First off - I needed a way to take drive from the crank while at the same time beef up a problem area. Now have a look at this next photo... See that big splined shaft sticking out. That was the main drive to the original clutch setup that resided in the removed rear casing. It had to go. So I chopped it off. I did have a photo that Hannah took of me chopping it off with a cutting disc (there was no way our bandsaw would have touched it) but I cant find the photo. However- here is a photo of that bit removed and now residing on our shelf of random bits.. Now luckily there is actually a flange on the crank. This was one item I had been trying to check before committing to buy an engine ages ago. I didn't know how think it was though, nor had I confirmed what the size of the six bolts were although I was fairly sure they were 8mm (but really hoping for 10mm). I was not going to be happy taking power off the crank, albeit its only 100 bhp propelling a little Imp and so I had a little think about it. I needed three things here. 1: a decent flange with 10mm bolts for the flywheel 2: a surface to run a main crank seal against because my engine design was going to have a sealed up oil bath for the oil pump drive 3: a larger flange to put a sprocket on. The design I came up with was an adaptor hub to bolt onto the existing flange using the six m8 bolts. But instead of just relying on the bolts to hold it I would machine it to a shrink fit and really make sure it wasn't going to move. Probably a bit overkill but why not. So I machined up this out of a rather large lump of steel (so filling my steel bin with a lot of swarf) It has two axial surfaces to shrink onto the crank- the flange outer and the stub I left over from the original splined sticky outy bit and clamped in place while it cools with nice new stront cap screws. Here I am tapping the threads for the flywheel hub.. Here's a small benchtop oven making things grow in size with heat and in the back ground is a crank just having recieved its new hub... In place and cooling down. Would be a bugger to remove now.. You can see the larger flange to which a sprocket will attach to. Now I needed to sort out a nice flat, removable surface to mount a potential idler sprocket and tensioners on plus an square surface to mount the oil pump driveshaft support on. I cut a piece of 6mm alloy plate in the faithful ( and noisy) tablesaw. I had several useful threaded bolt holes left over from a variety of the original transmission bearing holders, shafts gubbins and shifter wotsits. I machined up a little pointy bit of steel with an offset slot. Then I was able to screw it into a hole leaving the pointy end just proud. With my plate lined up where I needed it I gave the plate a smack with a hammer just over the pointy thing below, thus leaving an indent I could drill through. Repeat for the others and I had perfectly lined up holes... Cool. I could now support the oil pump shaft. I machined the end of it and tapped a new hole. Then machined up a bearing holder like so... Next little thing was to join the cranks rotating motion to the oil pump and make that rotate.... Hmmmm. I had to really think about this one. There was not a lot of room for industrial chains and sprockets. I thought about using a toothed belt that can run in oil like some of the later cars. But apart from the prices (!) they are not available in many sizes and are apparently prone to throwing their toys from the cot. I couldn't run a dry belt due to the bottom half of this area being part of my new allocated sump capacity, not to mention sealing it would be very tricky. So really- chains and sprockets were the best choice. Why 'chains' and sprockets? Not just one chain?... Because I wanted to drive the Honda pump at or as close to the original speed- which is slightly under driven. This way I would be sure that the pressure and volume would be about right. No ifs or buts. I didn't mind going slightly faster because the stock goldwing has a low oil pressure at an idle of 11 psi at 800-900 rpm. I'd be happier if that was a bit higher. With this in mind I had already worked out roughly what gearing I would need to be in a certain range. I had worked out the original gear ratios and then used a gear calculator to play around with ideas... But what chain and sprockets to use? I enquired with so many places and had done loads of internet searches but the answer came to me when I lifted one of my bikes down from the wall before going for a ride. Of course! Bike chain, chain rings and sprockets! At first I worried about the strength and durability but thought about the abuse my chains go through, especially on my singlespeed MTB. I have only broken one chain and it was after it had been jammed. Over about 15 years of being a bike mechanic in several different shops almost all chain failures I had seen were due to something else cause them- unless they were a cheap unsuitable chain. So I went through my varied collection of chainrings and cassettes (I have many) and selected out the ones with a tooth count that would work and fit. I machined up a spare shimano freehub to take bearings like this... Machined out a Shimano mtb chainring and cobbled together a mock up to see if it might just work... It looked good but I was not happy with the 3/32 width ring and sprockets. Even though they will be in a oil bath there was still not a lot of thickness to the teeth. I was not expecting this engine build to do Lexus levels of mileage but I wanted it to last long enough to do some good hoons for a few years at least. I had enough room to go up to 1/8th width chain but no more. I looked into BMX chainrings but very hard to get the toothcount I needed and sprockets were much the same- plus bloody expensive when going odd sizes. So a mate at a local engineering suppliers priced up some american sprockets that I could grind/machine down. Wow- cheaper then shimano stuff and tough as. I bought a set of four and set to turning them down. Not easy- in fact it took ages as they are induction hardened teeth. But I finally took them down from 5mm to 3.3 and they fitted a spare bmx chain I had perfectly. Much more sturdy... I have now got a very durable bmx/e bike chain that has flat straight outer edges on its plates- this will suit my tensioners. I have a couple of tensioner ideas to try and think I have nailed how to make them easy to fit and effective. Remember- I want all of this lots to be super easy to unbolt and swap out. Its all a totally unknown design with regards to longevity so it needs to be easily serviceable. More soon ...... Alex
    57 points
  13. So, long time no update. I have been holding off as shit was so nearly there for fucking weeks but kept on dragging on... Early September it got shipped off to Wellington; Then early October it arrived back home with a very excited son of a truckie.. Then I got the list from the cert man and was pleased/kind of surprised how short it was; - Needs rear headrests - Extra size on the driveshaft hoop mounts - Front seatbelts needed to web clamp type not inertia - Change a vac hose for proper auto stuff - Wheel alignment That was it and apart from sourcing the seatbelts it was all done in that weekend with the help of some butty ramps I had made for this sort of thing; So if anyone needs a brand new set of vertical fit reels, hit me up. Then I waited for the cert man to approve all that and get the plate done - this was another couple of weeks... Then the compliance man was on holiday and couldn't do anything for another couple of weeks... Then I realised much to my disappointment that the head was probably cracked as it was using water and pressurising the system That will teach me to not get things checked by professionals and just trusting to the prime cause. So while I was waiting for the compliance man I dragged out the spare head out of the container and sent it to Mean Machine for crack testing. This came up sweet but the valves were dodgy and the surface was a bit banana. So I got it surfaced and the valves and seats recut, plus I got a spare set of injectors rebuilt as i didn't want to fuck up the newly sorted head. Getting it in and out was not too much of a drama with a bit of channel clamped to the forklift forks. I didn't really take any pics of all this as I was on a bit of a mission, just this one of the freshened head put back in place; New gaskets, head bolts, slightly thicker oil plus filters plus coolant and much money out of my account and the jobs a goodun. Then fast forward to today and we have this very very exciting situation early this morning... Resulting in this even more exciting situation this afternoon; Ah shit yes. Anyway there is still a bit to do, I am not happy with the radiator situation as it is pretty much relying on the fan even at road speed. I can fit a standard Safari rad in the same hole but with much bigger collection area, plus I have some cunning plans to duct more air toward it so at least on the open road it isnt cycling the fan. Still I'm pretty happy, it has been a long but satisfying road. Beer will be drunk tonight I imagine....
    55 points
  14. Rightyo, I'm pretty damn excited about my recent purchase so thought I'd share it now, although the car isn't in my possession yet ... Longish sharn below; After selling my 323 wagon in January for (IMO) silly money, I was immediately on the look out for another car, this time preferably a rotary. An option of taking out a 5-10k loan was on the cards, giving me a max budget of around 20-25k. I'd looked at a few cars locally, rx7, rx323, rx626 etc. Either they weren't ticking the right boxes, or would have required more money to get them legal than my budget could stretch to. And from previous experiences around paying off a loan whilst owning an old car, it does get hard trying to either keep the car running whilst paying off the loan, let alone saving money for modifications etc. So I made the decision to not get a loan and keep within my actual budget. Nothing rotary in NZ was going to happen with sub 15k, well nothing that appealed to me anyways. So after reading through the importing from Japan thread and picking a few people's brains that have 'been there, done that'. I began searching Japanese sites for a car that I'd be happy with and contacted Stacked to act on my behalf, and to help with questions I had on particular cars and more information that I wanted from the sellers. https://oldschool.co.nz/index.php?/topic/55223-importing-from-japan/ I eventually narrowed the search down to 3 cars that were within my budget: 1979 mazda familia (323) wagon - still piston - still for sale actually if anyone was wanting to buy it, considering I sold my yellow rough one for almost 12k, this does seem like it could be worth while buying https://www.carsensor.net/usedcar/detail/CU5545473225/index.html?TRCD=200002&RESTID=CS210610 1981 Mazda Luce - not for sale anymore, but was 13B, automatic - luxury barge spec mazda 3rd option is the one I've pulled the trigger on and purchased - and just received confirmation today from Autohub that it's ready and waiting for shipping to NZ! 1985 Mazda Cosmo, 13B model, with, unfortunately an automatic gearbag. I only have the crap quality images below, but the car appears tidy, a little bit of rust in the doors, and thanks to one of @S124AB's contact in Japan, I was able to obtain some better quality pics which showed the underside of the car looking relatively clean and tidy. I priced up shipping, GST and a conservative compliance budget and this was affordable with no loan required. Anything rotary and manual seems to equal more dollars in Japan, so I'll live with the automatic for now. Plans will be; Get legal Lower Wheels Cruise and enjoy Save up for a manual swap, coilovers, cert, maybe engine porting of some sorts. Will update once the car arrives at my place. I'll either be really happy with the condition, or I'll be selling as parts lol
    54 points
  15. Yesterday afternoon I got to make use of the truck when we helped the neighbours do the hay. Every year we and a few other local farmers help them out with the hay and then we all get pissed and eat way more food than one should. Always a grand afternoon out Its been noted that flat deck farm utes suitable for hay are getting less common around these parts so they are super stoked we now have this truck...
    54 points
  16. Got the body in primer about 6 weeks ago It then took me all that time to get it up to a reasonable state so that it could then be painted. So then a couple days a go we loaded it up on the trailer (only just fit!) and dragged it into the spray booth at work. Sprayed the base and clearcoat on, it turned out pretty good! A few runs around in places, but nothing that can't be fixed. Pretty stocked really! Could of easily gone wrong haha. Gonna leave it in the booth for a few more days to harden, then take it home and get some underseal on the underside. In the meantime get the rest of the panels ready for some paint too.
    54 points
  17. Been a long time no update but anyway thanks to Stu and Sheepers and Nick the Sparky this is where we are at. Weird. Went pretty smoothly, it's spooging a bit of oil out the breathers on the top but I guess once it's run in that'll settle down or it'll just keep doing it cos 4AG life. I have 5 forward gears, a clutch that works and some brakes so with a few hours checking things and tidying up small jobs there's nothing stopping me from going for a wee drive. Oh the thermostat doesn't seem to be opening but that's not really a big deal to sort out hopefully, it might just be old and stuck, or new and stuck, as the case is.
    54 points
  18. This showed up at home today - pretty happy with how tidy it is, certainly not mint, but I would have been shocked if it was. Flat battery, no engine coolant and a little exhaust leak will be the first little jobs to do, along with oil change and filters too. Chatted to a local compliance place that will do a pre compliance check over and point out any likely repairs needed, before doing a full on compliance inspection so will try get it to them in the next week or two
    53 points
  19. Home again. Real pleased with the results and it cost less than I thought it was going to, as I'd asked Grant to paint the wheels and a couple of other bits, and respray the black parts that got primer overspray at the blasting place It's hard to get a good pic of the colour as it seems quite different depending on light and the camera Now i just have to not fuck it up too much as I put it back together
    53 points
  20. It's at the stage now where it looks like I've done fuck all Which is sort of true. Have been too busy to get a lot of time on it But have been chipping away at small jobs Carb rebuilt Alternator mounts made Throttle cable done Mod and painted the carb hat Calipers cleaned up and painted Radiator finished Hose shapes mocked up just have to find something that sort of fits Turbo oil drain 90% sorted just need a fitting for the block end Takes ages when everything needs blasting and painting and then it seems best to leave it for a week to harden properly
    52 points
  21. Got some longer wheel studs for the front. Painted the hubs and installed some new genuine Toyota wheel bearings and seals. Have also changed the front springs to some shorter 5kg ones and added some keeper springs. Need to find some 100-130mm long 4kg springs for the rear, but they're proving hard to find. Painted the inside of the hatch, doors and bonnet. Finally managed to finish prepping the rest of the panels and took them into work this weekend. Had a bit of drama with the base coat being the wrong tint, as I had another 2 litres mixed up since there was only about 1-1.5 litres out of a 4 litre tin left after doing the body and didn't want to run out. Turned out the new mix was a bit darker, but managed to get 2 coats of that on and then one coat of the previous left overs sprayed on top. So hopefully it matches to the body! Stoked with how it turned out! I sprayed the basecoat and then my coworker Justin came and sprayed the clear on, so thanks to him for doing such a good job! Assembled a few bits today. Could just stare at this thing all day!
    52 points
  22. Suspension partially done, 2" drop spindles, 3" lower springs in the front , and diff put on top of the springs in the back. I drew up a notch and got that laser cut, that's ready to pick up this week so next job is to whip the tray off and glue the notch in and make some shock mounts One of the front shocks fell apart when I took it out , that explains the rattle in the front suspension I'm not sure if the wheels will stay, one has started rusting already and its probably going to rub once the front bumpstops get a trim and the rear has some travel. So I'll probably put the stock wheels back on And waiting for some new front shocks I ordered a couple of weeks ago but I think covid has slowed that down
    50 points
  23. Got the underseal done, used some tintable bed liner so it should be super durable. Came out so nice! Have been slowly assembling things that won't get in the way later. Installed a whole bunch of Kilmat pretty much everywhere I could. Once it's rollable again, going to try and take it in and get some new carpet installed throughout. Painted a bunch of stuff black this weekend. Not pictured is the sway bar, steering and control arms, steering rack and the new radiator support piece. Dropped the diff off to Geartech and they set it up properly and while they were at it swapped in the S15 6th gear into the J160. Need the front crossmember back from sandblasters, then that can be painted and put in. Also waiting on a bunch of new bushes and and zinc plating to be arrive before much more assembling can be done.
    50 points
  24. So it's been roughly 6 months and 5000kms, I thought I would do a situation report; It's fucking amazeballs. It's not stupidly big so I can use it as a daily no problem, although I do need to choose my parking spots a bit carefully. It's still big enough and industrial enough to make sure that merging like a zip is a given. It's actually really comfortable to drive, plus it's rock solid on the road. It will happily sit at 100 or so no problem. I'm getting on average 12.5l/100km, not amazing but not bad either. It is pretty lively off the mark so a reasonable balance. It takes a shitload of stuff. I put 45 sheets of 12mm ply on it the other day, 750 or 800kg, no problem. The deck is also big enough to take sizable items, it's way better than the townace for that. It's still quite noisy, I must find some vinyl and redo the floor with some deadening. I put some extra speakers on the dash that I got from the dump shop for $6, this helps me hear my audiobooks a bit better. Last night I installed a wee powered sub, now music is pretty listenable too. The wiring situation under the dash is getting stupid, I actually bought some distribution blocks today so I can remove the splice upon splice of power wires that power the stereo/sub/egt/cb/etc etc. It's got to the point even I don't know what's powering what. The engine rattle is still there but seems not to be an issue, I'll run it till it blows up I guess. But overall I am super happy with it, it is so incredibly practical. Its probably the best thing I have ever built. PFT, here it tonight loaded up with shite;
    49 points
  25. Well the last few days has been a bit emotional and busy. Did the last few tidy up jobs on the housetruck and added a few little features we had always intended to but never got around to (typical..) Main thing we added was a bit of decking on the roof. This serves a few purposes. The black butynol roofing gets fucking hot in summer, too hot to stand on. Not ideal for insulation or bare feet. It also gets a bit grubby = messy feet or shoes marking the floor or carpets. Plus the plywood roof is 12mm which is strong but still springy to walk on between the rafters. The decking is sat on runners above the rafters so now feels solid as. We got rid of the ugly old temporary pop out roof sheets of alloy that we'd put up after fixing the roofs and fitted new thicker shiny alloy with proper edgings. Also added gutters so now the rain wont run down the side of the popouts. So the last few days we emptied out all our stuff and moved it into the mezzanine or the cabin. Quite amazed at how much stuff we had collected and stashed away in the truck! Then a final clean up and moved the truck down into the yard. Ran it up hot and did an oil change. Took a few more pics of it. Here's one with Minky the Micra for scale... Then drove it to its new home. Luckily only 10 minutes away! We had to cut back loads of trees to get it down their driveway. The owners taking heaps of photos as we went. Finally parked it up... It wont stay in this spot for good. The young family that will be moving in are in isolation having just got back to NZ. In two weeks time I'll be popping round to run them through the ins and outs, packing it up for travel and setting it up etc. We'll go for a brief drive too so they can have a feel of what its like to drive. Then we'll set it up in its new home spot proper. But for now that's where it is. Hannah and I had a cup of tea and said bye bye to our reliable, comfortable, safe and cosy home of almost the last 9 years or so... Yes we are sad to see it go because its our home that we built. But also really excited because its another step in life. We can finish the mezzanine now, build a garage, do some other little projects but most exciting is we also get to build another housetruck! We left the truck went to the local cafe/bar and had a pint with local friends - where word throughout the village that we had sold the housetruck was already well out there. Suitably fizzed up on beer we walked home on a warm evening and discussed our next housetruck build... So that is this thread finished. Its been a great journey and I'm sure its entertained a fair few. I'm hoping its inspired many to try out this housing and lifestyle and also been a useful source of ideas, tips, designs and lessons for those who were already building or about to build a housetruck. I'll be back with another thread soon for what will be our 4th housetruck build (excluding a few vans along the way) As always we've learned loads of things and look forward to using the lessons learned and ideas gained for the next build We have both already been checking out the usual places for a suitable truck. Fun times! Alex
    49 points
  26. Made a new parcel tray out of some 2mm aluminium and mounted some Pioneer TS-X8 box speakers on it. Also fitted the rear window, just waiting on some new chrome filler trim to arrive, hopefully it fits right. Straightened up the bumpers and bumper filler panels. The filler panels are originally covered in rubber and they had a few spots where they had formed rust bubbles underneath and just looked terrible, so stripped that all off and tidied up the steel panels. Made some mounts for the radiator. Need to get the engine in to see if there's clearance between the fan and engine before I finish mounting the shroud. Finally got the engine back from being built. Basically it's got big cams, CNC ported head, uprated valve springs, TRD headgasket, Toda cam gears, then just all the usual stuff to freshen it up. Will try and get some proper specs soon. Got the throttle body's and manifold vapour blasted and then went through and replaced all the zinc socket head capscrews that everyone seems to send with their aftermarket parts, with some nicer stainless button heads. Gave the gearbox a coat of silver metallic basecoat and then since it was getting some clearcoat sprayed over the top, I thought it'd be rude to not throw some metal flake in too. Need to decide on something cool to paint the cam covers in now!
    48 points
  27. That's the panelbeaters 99% done. Now to find a few hours to bolt all the front suspension back in and get it rolling again.
    48 points
  28. Front crossmember and steering rack back in. Got one side of the suspension and brakes bolted in. Have pieced together a Wilwood Dynapro 4 pot brake upgrade with 250mm rotors. Just fits under my 13" wheels with a 12mm spacer. Got the fuel tank back from powder coating and bolted that up under the car. Has a 255lph Denso in-tank pump with a Holley HydraMat pickup mounted inside. Test fitted the wheels with the 12mm spacers on the front, when this was running I only had 6" wide wheels on the front, so it'll be interesting to see how the extra width fits. Cleaned up the side rear window rubbers and glass and chucked them back in. What a huge difference that makes to the whole look of the car!
    47 points
  29. Finished up what I think was all the fabrication and welding on the body. So gave the inside a good clean, sand and then sprayed some epoxy primer down. Came out really nice and smooth! Scuffed back the bits that need to be nice as they aren't being covered up once the interior is back in; wheel wells, strut brace and the b to c pillars. Also went around all the seams and applied some seam sealer, matched to the factory look. Then it was ready to spray the base coat and clear on. Really happy with how it turned out, got all the visible bits nice and glossy! Got some basecoat matched to the brown colour of the dash and spayed some on the dash top piece. Sprayed some flattened 2k clear on top. Got the outside, underneath and engine bay mostly sanded back, hopefully done by next weekend so it can be epoxy primed. Not really too sure on what order to do things from now though. Would like to try and avoid having to mask it up multiple times and having to sand the whole thing in-between each process.
    47 points
  30. Well it worked pretty good! Only real defects are on the face with machine allowance. The volume of the chill block didnt really seem to matter so I think going forward I'll size them to at least 100% of the volume that needs chilling.
    47 points
  31. Many years ago, about 14 years or so, I bought a car off a friend so I could learn to drive and get myself to work. It cost me $400 with reg and wof, and was awesome. That car was a 1976 Morris Marina 1.8 SUPER. It was green ("Spanish Olive"), and it was damn near immaculate at the time. The only issue was that it drank about as much oil as it did petrol and the second gear synchro was slow. I thrashed that for a while, but eventually the Japanese bug bit and I sold it when I picked up a dirt cheap N/A BFMR Familia. I sold it to a young kid who wanted it to learn in like I did, but it was soon sold again and as far as I know its been sitting in a barn since. Rego on hold, but probably a pile of dust. Being the complete sicko that I am, despite owning many cars, and bringing a few other classic Brits back from the dead, I've always pined for another Marina. Hell, my Wife tried to buy my old Marina back a few years ago, but that fell on its face for various reasons. I figured if I can't get the old green machine back, the next best thing would be to keep an eye out for the ultimate version, the coupe. Coupes are rare. Well, Marinas, in general, are rare thanks to the (misguided) unpopularity of them, but coupes are just something you never see. Before I went and looked at a wrecked Twin Carb (TC) coupe in a field over Xmas, I hadn't seen one in person. The coupe in the field I ended up passing on because of its location (middle of nowhere; expensive to get a truck to pick it up), and the fact someone had pinched the plates and tags from it (probably to rebirth another Marina that had a dead rego) and it couldn't legally be put on the road again. If it's still available I might end up buying it for parts, we'll see. Anyway, back to the story at hand. The other day I had a PM from a fellow Old School forum member that knew I was looking for a coupe, letting me know there was one just listed on Facebook Marketplace. Sure enough, there it was. That's the one and only photo on the listing (and it's not a TC), but that didn't matter to me. I got in touch with the seller and within an hour of being listed, we had agreed to a sale and it was mine. The next day seller sent me more photos showing the current condition. The worst bit (that the seller knows of), the rust in the sill And the AUS spec OHC 1750cc E-Series single carb power house. As the story goes, the sellers dad has had the car for years, and the father and son started to restore the car to former glory. Unfortunately, the father passed away and the car has been in limbo since. The seller was happy to hear that I intend on returning the car to the road and undertaking a restoration of sorts. It may not go back to completely original, but I'm not going to chop it up and hot rod it. I have no doubt the car will be a hell of a lot of work and a lot of money. The first job is to even get it here, as it's currently across the Cook Strait in Blenheim and I'm in Wellington. Not far as the crow flies, but a large body of water that can only be crossed by plane or boat blocks it. A truck is arranged to pick it up at the end of next week, and then I'll get to see what the heck I've got myself into. This particular car is a little interesting just in the fact that's its an NZ Built, Aus spec car, meaning it gets the E-Series Over Head Cam engine, instead of the A or B series pushrod engines the UK cars have, but also has various bits of local content such as brakes, suspension and interior. Decoding the VIN it appears to be a Deluxe spec, with the 4 speed manual. The plan is to sell the TVR to make space and money, get the Marina going and stopping, and then cut out the rust. New sill panels are available off Trademe, so will replace the whole sill, and cut out any other rust I find. Once its solid, going and stopping, then its just a case of taking it for a WOF inspection to see where I'm at. What happens after that depends if I can get hold of the TC in the field. Oh, did I mention the rego is on hold? Well, it is, and its been off the road for almost 25 years. This will be the oldest save of any I've had before. The cool thing is that the rego is super optimistic... Yeah, its a "Sports Car", just like the TVR. I dont think anyone has called a Marina that before. I've started collecting things that might be important, such as an original BLMC workshop manual, in original Marina branded binder Ideally, I'd love to get this on the road, tidy up the interior, repaint the exterior (original paint, which I think is Bold As Brass yellow, or a different colour...?) and then rebuild and fit the twin carb engine from the field car to it. I need to have the car in my hot little hands first and see what it needs and what it's missing. I could be over my head in rust issues yet, who knows. We'll see soon enough. Discuss here
    46 points
  32. Well it didnt 100% work. But it could definitely be fixed with a welder! It didnt fill fast enough and there wasnt enough pressure. So they had to frantically fill from one of the riser holes to try save it. In doing that there is a big section of cold lap and a big hole! So the changes would be to have 2 filling sprues in the middle of the casting. Then increase the head pressure a little bit. The bowl I had in the sprue was way too big and reduced the head pressure. For the most part it looks pretty good. All the finer details are there. No cores collapsed or shifted, no shrinking of any areas so I dont need to worry about chill blocks. El Camino for scale. Going to have to figure out an easier way to do this in the shed. Was way too much work!
    45 points
  33. Got the front crossmember back from sandblasting. The bottom had a few scrapes and dents in it, so made up a skid pate type thing and welded that on. Also while I was there, added a bunch of stitch welds around the whole crossmember. Sprayed some 2k black over it and few other things. Slowly assembling a bunch of things. Diff with new seals and assembled back together and then lifted in to place. Hopefully one of the last lots of zinc plating back. The 4 round bits and top right brackets are for a front brake upgrade (two sets actually), just waiting for some longer wheel studs to arrive and that can be assembled.
    45 points
  34. While I was fabricating the roller, I visited a bunch of engineers in the region and found that no one had a lathe big enough to machine it. Bugger. After getting some quotes from further abroad that would have blown my entire budget by themselves (15-20k). I decided that I'd just build my own lathe.. I jumped onto Ebay and ordered the cheapest set of linear rails I could find, including the ball screw and bearing blocks. 3-4 weeks later I got set to mocking up the "lathe" using the compound slide from my Stanko mounted to some adapters. Spinning the roll by hand with the compound slide clamped to the linear rail, I took the first test cut. "Fuuck yeah, this'll work" I said.. It would have taken forever to machine the 3mm x 25mm weld bead off, but I remember once when @kpr mounted his angle grinder in the lathe to cut through some hardening on a set of axles from memory? (that image is burnt into my mind, probably thinking it might be a useful trick one day. cheers dude!) The grinder worked really well and made short work of it. Spinning the ball screw with a battery drill.
    45 points
  35. This chapter is called: I blew up my motor but shit that was good . So the VVTI issue. I realized that I would be able to get the front plate off the VVTI pulley, and then hopefully wiggle free the spring and the locking pin without removing anything else. Thankfully it worked! Then put that front plate on, and done. Then fire the motor up, advance the cam 5 degrees - success! The cam is moving, finally. Excellent. However - with more advance I ended up hitting valves into pistons - at around 20 degrees advance. Bummer! This motor must have smaller valve cutouts than the non hybrid engines I guess. I should have checked this, rookie mistake. So in some ways it was good that the locking pin was stuck, otherwise I probably would have done this on day one instead of lots of fun doorting around. It doesnt sound catastrophic, I dont think any valves have broken off. But the motor turns over like it's got no compression now. So probably tweaked the valve heads. But it's not crunchy sounding and it turns over freely. If anything I'm a little dissapointed that it's come to a fairly inglorious end, rather than sent to valhalla at 8800rpm blaze of glory. The options from here once the head is fixed or replaced: -Keep as is, run with no VVTI (boooo) -Cut bigger reliefs into the pistons so full VVTI can be used (hooray) but slightly less compression thanks to cutouts (boo) This all sounds like a bit of a downer, but my general mood right now is I'm fizzing about what an awesome success this all was. As a proof of concept, and a reasonably cheap project to keep me entertained this has been completely excellent. What I've learned is that there's no way I'm going to have the discipline to keep the revs on this motor below 8k when it loves to still rev up past that. So it would have been a matter of time until rods exited block. Also since I now know that I will have to remove pistons for machining some cutouts, I can replace rods at the same time with cheap stronger ones. This gearbox is a bit clunky and it could really do with an LSD. So while it's all apart for LSD install I can see if the shifter forks are a bit beaten up or something, and replace with parts from my old box which is buttery smooth to shift. So I've learned some stuff that would necessitate engine/box removal regardless. There will probably some slow progress for a while, but I'm super happy with how it's all come along. My goal is to get the car awesomely sorted for a December trackday and OS drags if they'll let me pest peoples eyes and ears with an Echo again. A++ would do hybrid motor doorts again
    44 points
  36. Finished and loaded up. Probably the most expensive and elaborate way to lower an El Camino! Looks like we'll see how good these bump stops are!
    44 points
  37. got the bumpers back from chroming. these pictures do absolutely no justice to how good it looks IRL. 2021-03-23_06-53-44 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-53-54 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-02 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-10 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-17 by sheepers, on Flickr 2021-03-23_06-54-24 by sheepers, on Flickr
    44 points
  38. So the new joints arrived this time but they were packaged incorrectly and for a different car. Because the theme for this project is buy things at least twice I ordered some more of the 'correct' ones and am now waiting for those to arrive. I was bumbling around in the garage and looked at it and thought 'I wonder if the spindles and brakes fit the other way around ' as the mount holes for the balljoints are angled. Swapped side to side, did a bump steer check , that got it down to 13mm, it had what appeared to be a shit ton of caster and the top ball joint was getting close to binding, so adjusted the top arm a bit and rechecked it, down to 5mm now with camber and caster in the ballpark Other people are having xmas parties, I'm in my garage quite excited at improving my steering and suspension geometry, what a nerd
    44 points
  39. Bolting clean painted parts on with new bolts is satisfying
    44 points
  40. 4 months later and suddenly the grass starts growing at a rate my mowing cant keep up with, all the flowers are out, birds are singing madly. The bush has the most amazing fragrant scent - especially the Lemonwood trees which have amazing flowers. The Kanukas and Manukas will start flowering soon too. At night time, because the land is mainly hillside we can walk along the driveway and the smell is so strong coming down from the bush. We now have two Keas who have claimed our place as theirs in the last two weeks. They are getting closer to the truck and fuck I hope they dont discover its Butynol roof membrane or the nice new rubbers on my Imp. As awesome and comical as they are I do hope they get bored and piss off elsewhere. There's also some falcons about. Usually breeding up one of the gullies and this evening I watched one of them attacking a Hawk until it flew away. Its weird that they dont seem bothered by the Keas even though Keas will happily eat some meat (well mainly the fat that they like) We now have a resident Chaffinch called Chaffy and a Blackbird called ... Blackie. I know. Terrible. They hang about here all day with us. Each morning they call us and wait for their porridge scraps. Chaffy has become a comically fat little fucker. Properly round! I'll get a good photo- you'll laugh. He now has a mate (Mrs Chaffy.. please dont judge. It was an easy name) She is still a bit shy. We think they might have started nesting in one of the Kanuka trees next to the truck. Will be neat if we get baby Chafffinches (except for the bloody naming bit...). No other birds have seemed to have spotted the abundent food these 3 get each morning. Weird. It might be that Blackie does chase other birds away. But he's cool with Chaffy and they will spend all day together just pecking about the place, mates really. Its quite fun. Then we sold the housetruck and stuff started getting real busy here! (so its the perfect time to buy three Micras then.... ha) With the truck going end of next month we had to sort out a proper decent living arrangement pronto. We still have the cabin and that's a nice place to sleep. But to live out of for several months/maybe a year while we build another housetruck was going to get boring real quick. So we have been building the mezzanine in the workshop. Now I was going to post up the progress of that in the shed thread but since its more actually a sort of alternative house build that is going to take place it can stay here. Plus once the truck goes we have loads of other planned jobs to do about the yard. Terracing and landscaping the bank behind and above where the housetruck is parked, with a view to designing it around the next planned HT build. We are also going to get rid of the tin shed in the yard, put some concrete down and build a garage- big enough for the imp or Micra plus loads of old bicycles. Old bicycles that seem to be breeding around here (because N + 1) We also want to build a nice little funky glasshouse and landscape between there and the garage a cool chillout area because it gets the last of the yards sun in winter. Then there is the elephant in the room - the cabin on the ridge. Might actually start building the decking up there this summer now that the timber is up there. We've bought an 1800 litre tank for up there. That will be a fun day out.... Anyway- yeah busy. So the truck is now cof'd and but for a few tidy up jobs we can consider it gone. Better build some upstairs accommodation then. I had posted up a few pics in the shed thread so some of you will have already seen its beginnings - which involved a whole load of timber. A lot of it has come from our own land and was already milled, treated and stacked in the yard. We have been keeping it covered, stacked neatly on flitches and it was great to finally rip into using it. Most of our beams are from that pile. Then we sourced more local pine from a friends place around the corner from us. Finally we bought a load from a local sawmill up the Motueka valley including some lovely Macrocarpa. We ran it all through our thicknesser because it looks nicer and doesnt hold the dust like rough sawn timber does... (Also lots of nice shavings for the compost toilet too- although we dont use treated stuff in there) Bought a decent sized metal bender for a customers gate job a while back. Damn I wish I had one of these ages ago. Came in handy for parts of the steel feet for the posts.. The main mezz floor down one side went up and looked great. Finally our main plan for the workshop was happening! (its the reason we had gone for the highest knee height we could , in our budget).. Getting the hefty unwieldy 3.6m long 20mm strandfloor sheets up to the next level was made easier for us two when we had a hoist to use... With the flooring up on that side we had to build some stairs. We wanted to move the steel rack too so we could put up the posts for the second level over the entrance bay. Having that rack out of the way and moved further in would also make for easier entry with trucks (important really....) So off with all the steel and sorted through it.. Move the rack along, make new wooden shelves for the top so I could satisfy my inner ocd leanings and organise all the offcuts neatly... Then we had more steel delivered including a length of 100mm rhs for the stair design I had planned. Started building stairs... Finished the stair metal work, made some big Macrocarpa steps and while I painted the steel work Hannah painted the corner plywood a nice yellow... Then finally bolt the stairway in place and attach the wooden steps. Really happy with how they turned out. Solid as and with loads of space below to stash other annoying tools (shame really because its so neat without stuff under there but it is a bloody workshop after all...) Then clutter them up with stuff ... Now with some stairs we could fill the mezz with bikes... Better storage solutions will have to take place- we have some ideas involving skyhooks, ropes and pulleys. Stairs completed so we better start building the next level up down the front. This will be a posh carpeted lounge room where folk can gather to watch a movie from (gonna get a projector for the ceiling) or just listen to music/read/dote on cat. Kevin helped by keeping guard over his new favourite rug... We have put up the floor up there and its great. I'll get some pics tomorrow. Now we will start building walls and lining stuff out. Got heaps ofg nice pine and Rimu flooring to use for some wall lining. We want a sort of smart/rustic look to this whole build and it has to be practical because after we have finished living up there it will be used as a workspace for cleaner jobs and projects. Oh and hey there macho men - don't laugh but I actually fancy getting into some sewing and making my own clothes- I have always enjoyed sewing but its a pain to do anything decent when you don't have the clear room to lay stuff out. So that will be a thing. helloooooo Oh I must add- we are both genuinely very excited about a future model train build so we are planning things around that too ie walls with holes, where track might go. It wont be to the same amazing level as things like the Pendon model railway but hey- ya gotta start somewhere and this will be a good space to do so. It will run around the perimeter and not be dated to any particular age so we can different eras and so include model cars from the 60s through to now. I want to make a sci-fi type section with futuristic type buildings and monorail like stuff too. Dreams but gonna go for it
    44 points
  41. I brought a bucket-list car! With money to burn from the Datsun 1200 sale, I was watching the market like a hawk. Lots of O.K stuff, lots of stuff that’s 5k darer than it should be, nothing really grabbed me. I had a flurry on a 180b SSS but timing was crook, I looked at the black Chrysler Windsor sedan on trademe with lust (should have got that one perhaps!). We spend 3.5 days at muscle car madness every year and I knew there had to be something interesting for sale out there. there wasn’t. on Saturday morning I spotted an auction for this 1970 coronet, freshly imported, in the South Island, only a wee bit above budget. Should I whack on a bid as a placeholder until the weekend was over and risk a bidding war that blew the budget totally? I asked some questions and never got a reply. I was erect. I scurried round the show and parking lot and couldnt see anything I needed. the ad looked to be written by an excited 10yr old. Spelling mistakes, grammar, murdered punctuation, rambling. It had it all. Through all the Fuckery and the new headache I’d got from re-reading the auction I decided I can fix anything and I can buy practically everything it needed brand new. I hit buy now on the Mopar Long painful story short the guy was in his own world, wouldn’t tell me where to send the transporter to collect, and had it in his mind his mate would do it for 3x what a truck costs me. eventually to make it all go away I said if you can do it for half price and deliver it Sunday I’ll do it. he arrived at 9pm on Saturday night, unloaded it and took the battery home. Rad, thanks. Also forgot the paperwork which is crucial for compliance. I managed to find the American for-sale advert during the week.. Oh my, it didn’t look anything like it does in the trademe shots. Thankful I did as it shows what’s hidden..And had some cool spares in the boot and ‘cuda Steels. (These never came to me, not a single spare part, who knows where they ended up) arrived on shithouse wheels with a flat tyre and the wrong wheelnuts. https://classiccarsbay.com/for-sale-1970-dodge-coronet-in-knightstown-indiana-319 we found the video he mentions, Cheered me up to hear it run nicely. Anyway, once he’d gone I had a poke around with the torch and my heart sank, it looked like a total sack of shit but still choice looking! To save a heap of uploads, here’s a link to the album. https://imgur.com/a/fDejyvy I got it into the shed and had a decent look about, so much misery. the ass end is fucked. There’s a block of wood in the boot to help keep the leaf spring from pushing through the bootlid. There’s a 2inch stagger where the other chassis rail has rusted through and moved. it’s ok, I can & will get all the rails and pans n shit and get it repair certed and complied. It will be worth quite a lot when done. I had hoped to have it mobile in a month or 2 and be driving daily as I don’t currently have my own wheels. this ain’t happening, it needs all bushes and joints and mounts and seat belts and likely a bunch of other stuff unforeseen. The only recent components on it are carb, dizzy cap and rotor! it starts and runs lovely, sounds grouse, moves around well but no brakes at all, and cause the fuel tank is now a can in the enginebay I can’t really test drive. Interior isn’t bad, I can live with it for a while. Needs a grant-style steering wheel though! ..so here begins another fucking rusty resto. stay tuned while I survive on noodles and prison wine + sell everything I don’t need to fund the B-Body dream! DISCUSS
    43 points
  42. I eventually unpacked the whole lot because I didn't want to risk the masking tape becoming permanently stuck to the wood. A quick test-fit of one of the rear pieces but for now the wood is all back in the crates to protect it from the sun and damage while I work (or not) on the body issues. It's seriously nice stuff from Rick though.
    43 points
  43. Some updates. Waikumete upholsteres made a carpet for me. 2 pieces, like original, and we found a loop pile in maroon! Which was brilliant, as I really wanted a loop pile for that more premium appearance. 20210321_161234 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 20210321_165710 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I think it turned out pretty well! Did the boot also, but I haven't got a pic of that for some reason. 20210408_210246 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Engine and gearbox came out again. This is minutes before it all lifted out. Very easy. 20210417_114901 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Pulled apart the gearbox with great guidance from Earle McFarlane. 20210417_121227 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Measured all the clearances, then pulled it apart. Selector hubs are a bit pwnt, there is excessive wear in the shift forks, bearings seem all right but they're all being replaced anyway with all those parts in the post above. So now the mainshaft has been assembled (in my absence) and we are just waiting on the forks to come in from Japanland so we can reassemble. 20210330_125040 by Richard Opie, on Flickr Since the motor was coming out anyway I thought it'd be a good time to get the top end sorted, as it's only ever been a stock head and cams, despite the bottom end being built/hi comp. This is a spare smallport head that I spent a while scrubbing in the shed to get clean. 20210330_125016 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I then thought I'd try cold jet/dry ice blasting as a bit of a test case on the cam boxes to remove the baked on sludge and scum. This is the result. Pretty awesome! I'm going to be using this process to clean some of the undercarriage parts in situ on the Honda. 20210331_084622 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I stripped the head myself, once I learned how to remove the collets from the retainers it was all pretty simple. Here's the head, with all the bits catalogued and in containers, with the Kelford 193B cams and Supertech retainers/springs I bought ages ago for it. It's in with Alan Harris at Harris Performance Engineering (previous Lynn Rogers) for porting, some tickles on the combustion chamber and a port match of the ITB manifold. I then got to thinking about what audio this car is going to have, even if you can't hear anything inside it really. Initially, I was going to run a modern Bluetooth head unit in the glovebox, and got as far as buying this pretty rad Sony unit that has 50wrms per channel - from a head deck!!! Enough to power anything, speaker wise. But then Ed sent me a link to a Yahoo auction that changed things. 20210422_172330-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 20210422_172308-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is an AD-189T fitting kit/adapter produced by Pioneer in the early 80s. It fits a 'B' type head unit, which is conveniently what the 'component' systems of the early/mid 1980s are. Before the standard DIN size we all know and love today. It replaces an entire middle panel on the dash, replicating the OEM fit where normally there would be a spindle mount head unit (as is the case on my factory dash). I had never, ever seen even a picture of one of these kits before, let alone a NOS one on Yahoo. So I bid on it, because who doesn't love period accessories. And I won it. So then I thought I'd probably better find a head unit to fit. 20210422_172407-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr I ended up with this Pioneer KP-717G tape deck. Note - it's a tape deck only, there is no AM/FM radio or anything with this, as was the style of the component systems of the time. This one was listed with a clean bill of health, and some remedial work done to ensure it was operational. The auction was backed up with a video to prove it. It's one of the higher end units in this range, with Dolby NR, adjustable tone controls, all the fruit. It doesn't have an amp on board - luckily Ed has one of the Pioneer GM-4 amps for this to plug into, that will find it's way into my car. 20210422_172454-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr This is how it should look when installed in the car, using the AD-189T kit. Fuckin. Awesome. I reckon. 20210422_172612-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr 20210422_172638-01 by Richard Opie, on Flickr And this is essentially what the initial system I run will be. Later on I may add some fronts - I have some NOS Pioneer TS167 coaxials, and also dual cones whose code escapes me right now. These TS-X9 are incredible though - I had them wired up to my amp in the house and they produce enough bass you can actually feel it through the floor. How they achieve it, I do not know. Sure it's not sub levels, but it's a beautifully balanced sound that I hope will be loud enough to listen to while pootling along at slow speeds or stuck in traffic. Thank you for coming to my TED talk. Hopefully, next updates will include a rowdy cylinder head, a slick shifting T50 and some Phil Collins tapes in the KP-717G.
    43 points
  44. FYI Moondiscs are coming soon.
    43 points
  45. Anyway, this car is now tuned. @kprkindly agreed to handle the tuning duties, following some initial setup by @Stujust to get me running in the meantime. Some things to note : 1 - the gearbox is still not good, downshifts into 3rd and 2nd are the absolute pits. 2 - this tune is still done with the stock head and cams, attached to the high-comp bottom end. Here's a short clip of the final dyno pull, Kris managed to eke 100kw out of it, the engine wasn't keen on taking a lot of timing due to my wack combo, but this is decent regardless I think. Anyway, it's a little smoky when it gets up in the revs, but I hope it calms down a bit with some bed-in time. The dyno session went fairly smoothly. The cam covers were leaking a bit of oil, and a few fasteners on the engine self-ejected, probably as a result of me not checking over the engine nuts and bolts thoroughly enough. So naturally, you get the thing home and you want to drive it, right? So I did. Here's a wee 2nd and 3rd gear entrance onto the motorway, gives a nice idea of how it sounds in car. But the best sounds are outside of the car, right? I got @Espritto take it for a skid up and down the main straight of my local test route so I could revel in the delicious doorts. It didn't disappoint, especially with these rowdy things reverberating off every concrete and steel building in the area. The exhaust also achieved the requisite amount of twang up in the revs, something I wanted to retain that 4AG character. Initial driving thoughts then? It's pretty good. I suppose taking your time with stuff and trying to make educated choices pays off somewhat. It's super cliche but it totally feels like a larger gokart. With the 275lb front and 225lb rear springs it feels planted. and quite lively when you chuck it into a corner. It's got enough travel you can punt it around with relative confidence, I took it for a brief squirt down the backroads out by Kris' place and felt immediately at home. I think with some minor tweaking it's going to be a really fun little chassis. The brakes are shaping up to be damn near perfect. I've fluked the cylinder sizes, it feels pretty good out of the box and is only getting better with use. Although I am yet to do a proper bed-in procedure on the pads. But I feel, aside from some adjustment of the bias, the brakes will be up to anything I can chuck at this car as it sits. You can tell me how bad the exhaust sounds in this discussion thread we all prepared earlier. Who would have thought I'd actually be close to completing this car?
    43 points
  46. Almost 2 years ago a chassis dyno popped up for sale on TradeMe with a starting price of 15k - I was immediately interested (after looking for quite some time) - so I called the owner to get some information on it. It turned out to be an old Vane 4000 bed with a Telma cc130 retarder, which had been upgraded to modern DTec data acquisition and brake control. Sweet! After talking to the seller for a while I got the impression it was rather traction limited with its smooth, small diameter rollers. It also sounded like the DTec wasn't that great at steady state retarder control. I threw in an autobid of 17k (my entire savings) and lost.. But over the couple of weeks that the auction was held, I got to thinking that maybe I could make a dyno for similar money? Google led me on a path to some pretty cool DIY dyno builds.. I thought, if they can do it, why can't I? - The only difference is that I'm not an engineer at all, bar 3 years of light fabrication work and the skills I'd acquired working on cars as a hobby. So after losing the auction I rang around truck and bus wreckers with no luck finding an eddy current retarder. Damn! - After a few weeks of hunting I found a Telma AC83-00 on Ebay in the UK which was a couple of decades old, but still new in the box. The quotes were quite horrendous at first to get it to NZ but with a very helpful seller who also sold the retarder to me for much cheaper than his listed price, the deal was done. I was pretty stressed for a few months as I had just sent a big chunk of money to a random bloke in the UK with no tracking and no contact with the shipping company - but 3 months later it finally arrived. You know that feeling you get when you buy a cool new car? This was almost better than that. 390kg potential paper weight...
    43 points
  47. JB Weld is a miracle, when it hardened to a putty consistency I flattened it out, pushing it under the lip, and looked good (put it on dash of other car in the sun to speed up curing)... And cranked up good with no fuel spills, ran it 10 minutes to cycle coolant and cure header paint... And a quick hoon with no bonnet... No probs apart from some hoses needing tightening, plus the upper arm is pretty close to the tyres, hopefully an alignment will improve this... And bonnet on and time to wash off 3 years of storage dust and grime... to Mr Sparkle... And down the bottly for a celebratory ale... Another check and nothing amiss, still need to fit air cleaner and fan shroud, plus top up trans fluid... And deserved I reckon...
    43 points
  48. Got some stuff back from zinc plating. Was more of it than pictured but I had already started assembling the bits back together before getting a photo. Still not sure why some comes out really nice and shiny and other bits come out dull. Most of it will get painted anyway so not too worried. Bought some longer trumpets from MRP. Need to get the throttle bodies vapour blasted! Got the Estima handbrake cables remade and lengthened. They didn't work with the original mounts so machined up a new aluminium one, took far too long! Bought an AE86 boot and fuel door lever assembly as I never liked having to open the hatch or fuel door with the key each time. Now was a good time to modify it all to work. Shaved the key hole. Works perfectly!
    43 points
  49. Another 2 done. Worked well. I think 4 paper weights is enough for now. Time to move on to something big! For reference of where it goes. Houses cam gearing.
    43 points
  50. Took the Imp for a hoon on Saturday. Went to visit a mechanic who works from home up a valley not far from us because he has fields of cars and I had spotted some Subaru Leones. Sadly he doesn't have an front wheel drive models because I wanted to nab any gear boxes that I can just as spares in case my decides to detonate. Top bloke though- he knows his scooby stuff having been a mechanic for Subaru NZ. He's given me a contact to try for boxes. So since it was a very lourverly sunny spring day indeed we thought we'd continue our drive further up the valley and check out a load of nice roads we normally cycle on. It was so much fun. I didn't drive super quick. Just enjoyed the nice handling and it feels quick anyway when you sit so low. I took this pic along the way. (some fellow oldschoolers might know the area because it was part of a circuit I lead folks on for a friday cruise on the weekend of the oldschool nats, Marahau 2014. We went to Mapua for lunch and hung out with all the posh people there. Then home via the supermarket to end a nice day out in the Imp. The day before I had picked up some carpet that local lady who makes funky cushions had sorted me out with for cheaps. Proper auto carpet, same as what I had used in my Viva... The workshop is finally a fair bit emptier having smashed out a few other jobs and got them picked up/delivered. One job we just did was build some hefty steel art deco styled gates and a large set of doors for under an outdoor cooking area for a customer in Nelson. We reckon the gates look really neat so I have to share ... Now going back in time to where I had finished off in the last post. The oil pump was now mounted and I had a oil filter mount in place. I had forgotten to take a photo of the inlet/outlet off the mount but picture two tubes coming out of its base and going through the wall of the engine block. I now had to link those two pipes with things. One had to make it way to the oil pump and the other had to work its way to the back of the engine (as positioned in the Imp) and link up to the main oil gallery into the block. I had to have a good think about this. Whatever I do to make it work has to be easy to assemble, through the bottom of the engine with the sump cover removed. Once the engines two clamshells are placed together I don't want to ever separate them again for two main reasons... 1 : Because that involves removing the heads so new gaskets required and that costs money and I dont like spending money. 2 : It also involves a tricky little system to fit three pistons into the bores, from the bottom of the bores, using removable piston ring compressors through a gap of about an inch inside. You'll see more on that later. I am NOT looking forward to that bit. Originally the Honda oil feed system used pipes and sealed everything with O rings. It works well and makes sense. I could work with that. I did entertain using lots of AN fittings and hose etc. However there was a few reasons why not. They are a bit pricey. They were not easily available locally, especially during lockdown. It is not at all easy to swing spanners inside this engine block. Did I mention they are pricey ? Ultimately if money was not really an issue for me I would dry sump the engine and run a external pump. But ugly, expensive, external oil tank in the way somewhere, driving the pump off a currently non existent belt drive pulley (not even got to that point yet for an alternator but I have an idea) So keep it simple with stuff I have to hand! With that I rummaged through the pile of alloy stock I had and found a few bits that would work... But O rings were going to be a bit trickier. The size used by Honda didn't match anything I had nor anything I could find on my suppliers website. They were odd. I looked through a Honda parts diagram online and found the Honda part number along with the exact size of the O rings. Nice of Honda to do that! Looked up sizes online and it turns out that they are a JIS standard Oring. I never knew of such things. Actually very common among many Japanese cars. Even better - when I searched through my suppliers website they actually had them! But wait - there's more!!! They were cheaper than all the other O rings close in size. Yay! But the shop was shut to public and I couldn't visit it anyway. Boo! Thanks Covid However- the shop was open for supplying engineering places that were considered essential services. It happened that one of the employees lived not far from me. He delivered some and left them in my mail box. Yay! So now I could start what Hannah refers to as the London underground of oil tubes. I worked my way from the oil filter and made various blocks with holes and tubes with grooves. All very carefully measured to fit just right and tight but constructed in a way that it could be taken apart from the sump opening. I was lucky that I happened to have a large drill bit that was spot on for the final pass on the bores to suit the pipes and O rings for exactly the same amount of 'squish' that the Honda factory pipes and fittings have. I made sure that all the bores were as big if not bigger than the Honda setup so not to increase restriction on the oil paths. You'll see later that I will be over driving the pump in speed by a notch but that's another story. I must add that the job of planning, measuring and machining up all these little bits was a super fun way of spending time during lockdown (in between going for heaps of bike rides on super quiet roads!) Here's some pics of my subway tube network. These are the two blocks that seal onto the in and out pipes for the oil filter... The closest hole will feed a pipe heading back to link to the oil gallery. The further most block has a hole that takes a connecting pipe from the pump. Here's a view from the side... Lets zoom out a bit so you can see where they are in relation to the pump... You can also see how the pump is bolted to an adaptor plate which is bolted to the inside of the block. My connecting pipe that goes between pump station and filter station is in two parts so it can be fitted easily from below... Together its like this (lighter for scale... because all the cool kids measure the dish of their hand machined oil pump pipes with lighters like this)... Then fitted in place... Connections man! So I had the pump to filter sorted. The filter to main gallery looks like this... That pipe sticks out through a hole that was originally for the shifter mechanism ( I think. But whatever... thanks Honda for your convenient hole) You can see the oil gallery below. I will make a bolt on block with oil ways to connect them. I will also design it so I have the potential to take off from there and add an oil cooler. I would rather run the engine without one. It never had one as a bike but the engine did have more air flow over the engine though. But my engine will have a well finned sump cover to pull off heat plus be free to radiate heat better than on the bike. I shall run it and see. Its not a race car so I suspect that with really good synthetic oil I'll be fine. Its a pretty understressed engine anyway. Maybe I can add an oil temp sender to my filter block and run that through the ECU so I can have it show up on Tunerstudio for evaluation? Hmmmm - I like little things like that. But either way- keeping it as an option is good. I have yet to make the cover plate (some alloy plate is under my bench for it) that will go over that end. All simple stuff that. Once that's in place I can make a union block to suit the pipes. That cover plate will also have the oil filler and possibly a centre engine mount to suit a cross member but I have not yet decided on that. Moving around to the flywheel end of the engine you can see where the oil pump drive shaft hangs out, waving about like an unsupported shaft with no attachments... That shaft needs some motorvation and that is going to be part of the next exciting instalment. It involves Shimano....
    43 points
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