azzurro

azzurros 1966 FIAT Duemilatrecento Familiare Discussione

146 posts in this topic

Me too! Had a good chat about scissors, but didn't discuss wags. In hindsight, the one of these at Horopito was the wagon I was standing in front of with Bart, wondering what it was.

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Keep up the good fight! was good to see it the other week, much radder in person!

 

And now I know why all the shots are with a fish eye, you aint got no room!

 

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Oh, missed all the discussione!

 

Thanks Boes, shit is coming on pretty good now with the ol' rust, pretty happy with how its turning out TBH.

 

Based on where and how its rusted in the arse, and the state of the tow bar mounting area I think that it was actually used by Nautilus Marine to launch and/or tow a few boats before it was laid up in the Rutherford Collection.

 

Wagnats 2017 is the target, but I think it will be on the road before then.

 

Next bits are:

- rear quarter (at least a week),

- rear of drivers sill (not long),

- drivers floor/sill (a long time - need to cut apart parts car too)

- drivers front fender/headlights (a couple of weeks)

- prep and paint (roof off white, rest blue - undecided on plan of attack with the blue here - doors don't need any work, but will look funny on a 'brand new' body - may top coat with cheap spay cans which will chalky up quickly)

- reassemble (a month?)

- electrics (oh fucken lol - this thing is VERY advanced for a 1959 designed Italian car, so many lights and switches! (and horrific electrical circuitry!))

- wof?

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Getting so close!!!  I'm loving the sign writing on the doors.. I hope you keep it.

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I believe that is the plan.

 

so cool watching you bring each area back to how it should be, very rewarding.

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cheers dudes,

 

definitly keeping the sign writing,

 

the trick has been trying to do the repairs well but not over do the surrounding areas or clean up every scratch.

 

Im a bit worried it might look like its got a fresh respray with old doors bunged on it (which is pretty literally what is going to happen) but i dont want it to look like that if you know what i mean.

 

i foresee some terrible 'how to fake patina' videos on youtube in my future.

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cheers bro,

 

picked up a couple of bits of angle iron a while ago to add to my metal bending and shaping 'kit' - made a big difference to the quality of my long straight bends!

 

the real trick is

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

flap discs

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Yes to flaps. For so many things. But pricey they be. Mitre ten had 10 pack warrior branded discs at $17. I thought nah they can't possibly be any good but bought some for a try. It turned out they worked fine and lasted as long as norton etc brands. But now discontinued :-(

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Yes to flaps. For so many things. But pricey they be. Mitre ten had 10 pack warrior branded discs at $17. I thought nah they can't possibly be any good but bought some for a try. It turned out they worked fine and lasted as long as norton etc brands. But now discontinued :-(

 

Apparently BOSCH has the new contract with M10 and is causing them to discontinue a lot of other brands and stock.

 

Would you guys rate flap discs over strip discs for paint/bog removal?

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Heh, I have a MAAASSSSIVE stack of the fine grit 'Warrior' branded flap discs that come with the multi packs - I only ever used the coarse ones, (5 per pack) still way cheaper than a single name brand flap wheel.

 

Tho, TBH I did buy some 40grit bosch ones and they do work better and last longer, but Im also tending to take the high points off with a grinding wheel first casue they flaps are much more expensive

 

Stripper discs for paint/bog as they don't remove the metal and I find the flap discs are a it crap for removing paint cleanly anyway.

 

However stripper disc do wear out fast and they are quite expensive so get as much as you can off with paint stripper or a wire wheel first?

 

For metal

- Take high points off with grinder wheel

- Smooth welds with Flap Disc/shaping

- Power file in hear to reach areas

- Final run over with 40 grit on DA sander to blend welded area into surrounding metal

 

- if you done it right the above steps makes the weld invisible - Im at about 50% on the invisibleness of my finished welds, but im more interested in making a solid (ie not rust) base for a thin skim of filler than making a concourse coachbuilt resto.

 

Getting that extra 50% would take about 200% more time, which for me would almost all be in setting up the patch 'just so'.

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Excellent work again!

Looks like it's coming along well.

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Cheers bro.

That is the worst bit of rust on the car and nearly the last of it - only have the drivers headlight and valance to do now then a few more skims of filler then paint. Its easy when you say it fast!

Bunged the parts car exhaust on just before and fitted the fuel tank from it the other day. Nice to be putting bits back on.

I will probably move the parts car back to the crack of doom now that i didnt end up using any body sections!

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Top work .I love see doctors in surgery ridding the sick of the dreaded worm cancer. 

 

Any chance of showing us how you made the ridges in the floor panels?? 

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Cheers bro!

 

I pretty much do as per this guy, but nowhere near as good.

 

http://www.build-threads.com/build-threads/thai-kombi-restoration/

 

tap tap tappetty tap.

Hammers, cold chisel and other formers (sockets, bit of wood, anvil, vice) to suit.

The finish you get is a function of the time spent, and many small taps is better than a couple of big ones. But Im a rough cunt and in a hurry

 

Basic process is/was:

  1. mark out sheet. pay attention to the edge and inner bends of the indents. These ones have a flat base so need two bends = 2 lines (inner and outer)
  2. Preferebly on both sides, but esp on the side you will be hitting (denting) - i didnt make any allowance for 'pulling in' on the floor panel (ieally it should stretch the metal at the indent) but smaller bits might be best to leave a bit extra on the edges to trim afterwards
  3. set up the vice to open to the width of the outer line, and with a chisel head hammer or ball peen slowly hit along the inner line
  4. keep going up and down slowly forming the bends, the hits on the inner line pulling the metal over the vice jaws into the indent
  5. once you have a nice indent, flip it over on an anvil and planish the piece up to the outside edge.
  6. lip it again and planish the base of the indent to the inner edge
  7. repeat steps 3-6 as required.
  8. I formed the radiused ends and flattened off the base nice and even with a socket.

The trick i reckon is taking it easy on the hammer, tappy taps are the way to go, keep tapping and flipping it then it will just happen.

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thanks chaps, feels good man. not far away now

 

wanged some colour on the door shuts & etc on saturday, and today got the mrs to drive it up the end of the road and back to turn it around to access  the pass side and front a bit easier. Did a mean one wheel peel on the slippery driveway - in reverse.

 

Once its all prepped properly i will line the cave and try reduce the dust and shite i was getting in the paint  - my dust 'suppression' consisted of barely even sweeping.

 

Serves me right.

 

Pressure valve on the compressor is leaky too which hasnt helped to get a nice flow!

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